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Slide Rules

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SPORTS
September 19, 2002 | Mike DiGiovanna
Most players who slide or dive on the rubber-like surface ringing Dodger Stadium land with a sudden thud, the impact often resulting in some kind of knee-jarring, hamstring-straining or ankle-twisting injury.
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BUSINESS
November 23, 2006 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
Fame found Tyler Cowen on the back seat of an airport bus. Travel-weary after a long flight back from a family vacation, the economics professor was returning to his car at Baltimore/Washington International Airport. Suddenly, a man leaned across the bus aisle to shake Cowen's hand, pronouncing himself a "huge fan" -- not of Cowen's economics work, but of the Internet blog the George Mason University faculty member created three years ago.
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NEWS
March 21, 2000 | MARTIN HENDERSON
Every time one of his players slides, Canyon High Coach Lance Eddy winces just a little. Eddy knows too well how fragile the human body is, especially the knees. He's keeping his fingers crossed that 2000 isn't anything like 1999, when his players seemed to be dropping at every turn. "I've never had one player with a knee injury, and to have three or four?" Eddy said.
AUTOS
March 29, 2006 | DAN NEIL
IN physics, the Greek letter "delta" indicates a change in value, a term that allows you to utter massively cool NASA-speak such as, "What is the delta in vector?" Or velocity. Or viscosity. After a long night at the Delta frat house, you may well wonder, what is the Jagermeister delta? Auto showrooms have deltas too -- the difference in price between one model and its upgraded version. For instance, the Porsche 911 retails for $71,300.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Bad actors are the boomerangs that always come back. That's true whether their crimes are big scale, as in the repressive government of mainland China and its mislabeled People's Liberation Army, or smallish, as in Mike Tyson adding another chapter to his tumultuous life by eviscerating heavyweight champ Evander Holyfield's ears during Saturday's title fight in Las Vegas.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2006 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
Fame found Tyler Cowen on the back seat of an airport bus. Travel-weary after a long flight back from a family vacation, the economics professor was returning to his car at Baltimore/Washington International Airport. Suddenly, a man leaned across the bus aisle to shake Cowen's hand, pronouncing himself a "huge fan" -- not of Cowen's economics work, but of the Internet blog the George Mason University faculty member created three years ago.
AUTOS
March 29, 2006 | DAN NEIL
IN physics, the Greek letter "delta" indicates a change in value, a term that allows you to utter massively cool NASA-speak such as, "What is the delta in vector?" Or velocity. Or viscosity. After a long night at the Delta frat house, you may well wonder, what is the Jagermeister delta? Auto showrooms have deltas too -- the difference in price between one model and its upgraded version. For instance, the Porsche 911 retails for $71,300.
SPORTS
December 18, 2005 | Jason Reid, Times Staff Writer
The slide probably would have continued in the past, spiraling out of control and ruining another season. History, though, is of no interest to these Clippers, who ended a three-game losing streak Saturday with an 89-81 victory over the Houston Rockets at Staples Center. "We've got vets now who know how to get out of tight situations," said guard Cuttino Mobley, who scored 18 points. "When you're young, and you're on a losing streak, you start feeling sorry for yourself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1988 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
After a yearlong trial, a jury on Wednesday ruled that acts of man, not heavy rainfall, caused a slow-moving landslide in Rolling Hills that has destroyed or damaged as many as 30 luxury homes since 1980. The unanimous verdict in Torrance Superior Court supported the current or former owners of 22 properties, who said that actions by the Rolling Hills Community Assn., which maintains roads and other common areas in the city, and California Water Service Co. are partly responsible for the slide.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | KAREN KAPLAN, karen.kaplan@latimes.com
If California's energy crisis turns computers into pricey paperweights and makes AA batteries as scarce as vacuum tubes, Tom Wyman will still be able to perform vital calculations such as finding the square root of 144 or figuring the value of 2 to the power of 10. That is, if he can decide which of his approximately 450 slide rules to use.
SPORTS
December 18, 2005 | Jason Reid, Times Staff Writer
The slide probably would have continued in the past, spiraling out of control and ruining another season. History, though, is of no interest to these Clippers, who ended a three-game losing streak Saturday with an 89-81 victory over the Houston Rockets at Staples Center. "We've got vets now who know how to get out of tight situations," said guard Cuttino Mobley, who scored 18 points. "When you're young, and you're on a losing streak, you start feeling sorry for yourself.
SPORTS
September 19, 2002 | Mike DiGiovanna
Most players who slide or dive on the rubber-like surface ringing Dodger Stadium land with a sudden thud, the impact often resulting in some kind of knee-jarring, hamstring-straining or ankle-twisting injury.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | KAREN KAPLAN, karen.kaplan@latimes.com
If California's energy crisis turns computers into pricey paperweights and makes AA batteries as scarce as vacuum tubes, Tom Wyman will still be able to perform vital calculations such as finding the square root of 144 or figuring the value of 2 to the power of 10. That is, if he can decide which of his approximately 450 slide rules to use.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | MARTIN HENDERSON
Every time one of his players slides, Canyon High Coach Lance Eddy winces just a little. Eddy knows too well how fragile the human body is, especially the knees. He's keeping his fingers crossed that 2000 isn't anything like 1999, when his players seemed to be dropping at every turn. "I've never had one player with a knee injury, and to have three or four?" Eddy said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Bad actors are the boomerangs that always come back. That's true whether their crimes are big scale, as in the repressive government of mainland China and its mislabeled People's Liberation Army, or smallish, as in Mike Tyson adding another chapter to his tumultuous life by eviscerating heavyweight champ Evander Holyfield's ears during Saturday's title fight in Las Vegas.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | BEN DOBBIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a lifetime spent elucidating nature's inner workings, physicist Hans A. Bethe has come to rely on a few maxims: Begin the day with a hot bath. Trust a slide rule over a supercomputer. Tackle only those riddles over which "one has an unfair advantage." At his zenith, there seemed to be few well-defined conundrums of the cosmos that Bethe couldn't master, from figuring out how the sun and stars generate energy to his central role in designing the first atomic bomb.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | BEN DOBBIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a lifetime spent elucidating nature's inner workings, physicist Hans A. Bethe has come to rely on a few maxims: Begin the day with a hot bath. Trust a slide rule over a supercomputer. Tackle only those riddles over which "one has an unfair advantage." At his zenith, there seemed to be few well-defined conundrums of the cosmos that Bethe couldn't master, from figuring out how the sun and stars generate energy to his central role in designing the first atomic bomb.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you hold a piece of paper in an outstretched hand and let go of it, the paper will fall slowly to the floor, moving this way and that as it goes. Though the laws of physics that govern its descent are perfectly known, there isn't a physicist on Earth who can predict with certainty exactly where the paper will land. If you do this several times, the paper will always come to rest in a different spot.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you hold a piece of paper in an outstretched hand and let go of it, the paper will fall slowly to the floor, moving this way and that as it goes. Though the laws of physics that govern its descent are perfectly known, there isn't a physicist on Earth who can predict with certainty exactly where the paper will land. If you do this several times, the paper will always come to rest in a different spot.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | JAY BERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Ryan Sanders is not afraid of dragons. He is particularly fearless when confronted by Danny Sea Dragon, a 50-foot slide at the Atlantis Play Center that is shaped, not surprisingly, like a dragon. "Whenever we come here, which is often, the dragon slide is the first thing he heads for," says Mark Sanders, 39, of Garden Grove, David's father. Three-year-old David has plenty of company.
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