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Slim Dunlap

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November 8, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slim Dunlap played guitar for four years in the Replacements, one of themost acclaimed and influential rock bands of the 1980s. But as he launched his solo recording career this year, (solo albums being de rigueur for ex-Replacements in '93), even committed Replacements fans probably had a dim idea of what Dunlap was about, and very slim expectations of what he could do.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slim Dunlap played guitar for four years in the Replacements, one of themost acclaimed and influential rock bands of the 1980s. But as he launched his solo recording career this year, (solo albums being de rigueur for ex-Replacements in '93), even committed Replacements fans probably had a dim idea of what Dunlap was about, and very slim expectations of what he could do.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Post-punk band the Replacements will reunite for the first time in 22 years to play at least three festival dates this summer, the band announced on Wednesday night. At their peak in the 1980s, the group was considered one of the great hopes for American rock, and though they never made a serious dent in the charts, their classic records, including "Hootenanny," “Let It Be,”  and "Don't Tell a Soul," remain some of the great guitar albums of the era. Formed in Minneapolis in 1979 by singer/guitarist Paul Westerberg, brothers Tommy and Bobby Stinson and drummer Chris Mars, the band was one of the tightest and most accomplished of a movement that spawned, among others, Nirvana, Dinosaur Jr., Soul Asylum, Husker Du and Sonic Youth, but the members split in 1991 just as their peers and inheritors were ascending to commercial and critical peaks.  Alas, the Replacements are these days best known for producing a Guns 'n Roses bassist in Tommy Stinson, who's traveled with Axl and company for 15 years now. His brother Bobby, a dynamic guitarist whose leads helped define the band's sound, died in 1995 after struggling with addiction; replacement guitarist Slim Dunlap joined them during their years with Sire Records, although a stroke last year will prevent him from participating in the reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
There were several mundane but pressing questions facing Paul Westerberg as he sat in a hotel room in Phoenix earlier this week. What was he going to do about the headache that had been bothering him since he got up? And where was he going to get a clean shirt to wear, now that everything he had packed for the road was all grubby? And would either of the above be resolved before he had to go off with the three other members of the Replacements for a promotional visit to a local radio station?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Roy Orbison's posthumous album and David Crosby's first solo LP since his much-publicized battle against drugs highlight an unusually busy January release schedule. Record companies and retailers normally are too busy recovering from the hectic holiday sales period to get very involved in launching new campaigns in the early weeks of the new year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
A couple of things to keep in mind regarding these lists of my favorite things of '93: First, I didn't hear every worthwhile album or concert. Listed are the best I happened to come across. Second, my own pleasure is the sole criterion I use in compiling lists of favorites. I don't care what music was deemed "important" by the rest of the pop cognoscenti. I don't give extra credit for music merely because it serves as a document of its times or defines an influential trend.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
P aul Westerberg is a rock star worth believing in, though it's taken him almost a decade to accept it himself. As leader of the Replacements, he wrote tuneful tales in the '80s about insecurities and desires with the intensity and insight of a young Pete Townshend. Yet the raw, raspy singer was the victim of his insecurities--leaving the widely acclaimed cult favorite unable to follow through on industry predictions of mainstream success.
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