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NATIONAL
March 21, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The nation's third largest supermarket chain announced Wednesday that it was joining with other major retailers and would stop selling ground beef containing “pink slime,” also known as “lean, finely textured beef.” Supervalu Inc. announced its decision in an e-mail to reporters. Earlier Wednesday,  Safeway Inc., which operates Vons in California and Nevada, announced it was dropping the product. “While it's important to remember there are no food safety concerns with products containing finely textured beef, this decision was made due to ongoing customer concerns over these products,” Supervalu said in its statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
How much legwork does pop stardom require? Next weekend Aloe Blacc will appear along with some of music's buzziest acts - OutKast, Haim, Skrillex, Lorde - at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, the idyllic annual gathering near Palm Springs that for many artists serves as proof that they've arrived. On a recent afternoon at USC's Galen Center, though, Blacc found himself somewhat deeper in the record industry's promotional trenches. The L.A.-based soul singer was rehearsing for an appearance on Nickelodeon's Kids' Choice Awards, and as he conferred onstage with his young collaborators - two dozen excited schoolchildren with whom he was to perform his song "The Man" - crew members installed miniature geysers designed to spew the network's trademark green slime.
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BUSINESS
April 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
For a controversy cooked up over a product that's been around for years, the recent outcry over "pink slime" seems to be hitting many businesses where it hurts, most recently causing beef products company AFA Foods Inc. to declare Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The Pennsylvania company is blaming the recent coverage of ammonia-treated boneless lean beef trimmings - variously mocked as “pink slime” or “Soylent Pink” - for its dire financial straits. The business, which is owned by billionaire Ron Burkle's Yucaipa Cos., said it will shut down operations at its California factory while continuing to produce ground beef elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Mark Haskell Smith
It seems there is nothing Dana Goodyear won't put in her mouth. Pig ears, beef hearts, crickets, stink bugs and ox penis are just a few of the things she knowingly chews up and swallows. In her new book, "Anything That Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a New American Food Culture," she goes deep into the counterculture of the foodie movement, unearthing black market butter dealers and unethical caviar hustlers; haute cuisine presented in apartments and endangered species served in pricey sushi bars.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
"Pink slime," a food additive made from spare beef trimmings that's treated with ammonium hydroxide to kill off E. coli , salmonella and other possible bacteria, continues to rear its slimy head. Last month, as KTLA reported , McDonald's decided to cease using the additive in its hamburgers.  This decision came after prodding by TV chef Jamie Oliver. On his "Food Revolution," the disgusted food activist says the additive is made of " all of the bits that no one wants . " The USDA, however, says the additive is safe to eat. The department is so satisfied with the stuff that it plans to buy 7 million pounds of ground beef containing "pink slime" in coming months for the national school lunch program, the Daily reported on Monday.  And that's created a whole new stink.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Amid the growing outcry over so-called “pink slime” beef product, three U.S. governors are stepping up to defend the controversial meat. The trio of Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback and Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, all of whose states have been affected by the backlash against the beef, joined together Thursday for a tour of a Beef Products Inc.'s operating plant in South Sioux City, Neb. The plant, one of the four responsible...
BUSINESS
September 13, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Beef Products Inc., a South Dakota meat company whose lean, finely textured beef product was dubbed "pink slime" this year, has sued ABC News for defamation and is seeking $1.2 billion in damages. The company, which after the controversy closed three of its four plants and laid off 700 workers, filed suit in state court in Elk Point, S.D., this week. It alleges that ABC News' coverage of the "pink slime" controversy misled consumers into believing that the product was unsafe, even though it had been approved for human consumption by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Writer H. P. Lovecraft's fascination with yuck and decay--with the loathsome and unnamable, with unspeakably foul and filthy beings lurking beyond the gates of consciousness--makes for icy-fingered terror as you read his stories. But not as you watch "The Curse" (citywide), based on Lovecraft's "The Color Out of Space."
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
A word of advice: Steer clear of prowling hagfish and nervous fulmar chicks. The former secrete massive quantities of gross-out slime; the latter, a type of seabird, upchuck on avian predators, inflicting grievous bodily harm. Both can be seen in action -- along with vampire squid, puffer fish and other ingenious creatures of land and sea -- in "Weird Nature -- Devious Defenses," a John Downer production for BBC and the Discovery Channel, screening Saturday in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium.
MAGAZINE
February 26, 1995
In the world of Nickelodeon, being slimed is a genuine honor ("The Sliming of Big Bird," by Charles P. Pierce, Jan. 22). As president of the network, I have personally been slimed on countless occasions, as have such entertainment legends as James Earl Jones and Steven Spielberg and thousands of gooey kids who consider being slimed one of the highest expressions of respect. We are concerned, though, that the cover may be misinterpreted by some as a negative statement about our opinion of Big Bird.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Nobody really dresses up for Nickelodeon's Kids' Choice Awards, because whether they are entertainer, presenter or honoree, they know they are likely to  be wearing a coat of slime by the end of the evening. Among those slimed at this year's event on Saturday were Pitbull, Sandra Bullock, Kristen Stewart (picking up a coat of green goo when she hugged Bullock) and Neil Patrick Harris. [Los Angeles Times] Selena Gomez, who picked up the award for favorite television actress, managed to avoid the goo. She looked summery in a sheer blue top and white shorts by Oscar de la Renta, Gucci heels and a Diane von Furstenberg bag. [Just Jared Jr.]
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
A former employee of Beef Products Inc. is suing ABC News, anchor Diane Sawyer, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver and others, saying that their use of the phrase “pink slime” ultimately cost him his job. Bruce Smith was among 750 people laid off by the South Dakota beef processor earlier this year amid fears over the safety and quality of a meat product dubbed “pink slime” by critics.  The product, known in the industry as lean finely textured beef,...
BUSINESS
September 13, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
Beef Products Inc., the South Dakota-based meat company whose lean, finely textured beef product was dubbed "pink slime" this year, sued ABC News on Thursday for defamation and is seeking $1.2 billion in damages.   The company, which after the controversy closed three of its four plants and laid off 700 workers, filed suit in state court in Elk Point, S.D., this week. It alleges ABC News' coverage of the "pink slime" controversy misled consumers into believing their product was unsafe, even though it had been approved for human consumption by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
What was meat-processing giant Tyson Foods Inc.'s response to the pink slime controversy this spring? A 4.4% boost in its earnings in its second fiscal quarter. The Springdale, Ark. company made a $166 million profit, or 44 cents a share, up from $159 million and 42 cents a share it earned in the second quarter of 2011. The higher prices Tyson charged for its protein helped balance out lower sales volume. Since Tyson's quarter this year ended March 31, the results don't include any effects on demand that may have been caused by the April discovery of a case of mad cow disease or unrelated concerns about a bonding agent dubbed “meat glue.” But the so-called “pink slime” scandal - which dealt with an ammonium hydroxide-treated ground beef product known officially as lean, finely textured beef - was in full rage in March.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu and Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Pink slime. Early death. Mad cow. Over the span of just a few weeks, the beef industry was hit by a string of crises this spring, resulting in the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars and hundreds of jobs. But it could have been worse. The industry, which had $79 billion in sales in the U.S. last year, was lucky that the most potentially damaging of the disasters turned out to be, so far, extremely limited in scope. And there are signs that the industry, despite stumbling in some of its public response, has learned to better handle such matters.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A national ground beef processor owned by Los Angeles private equity firm Yucaipa Cos. and basketball Hall of Famer Magic Johnson filed a bankruptcy petition seeking protection from creditors, blaming, in part, bad publicity over products containing so-called pink slime. AFA Foods Inc. said it sought bankruptcy protection because it was "faced with an immediate and unanticipated liquidity crisis" and was unable to pay vendors last week without a loan, which banks refused to provide.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
For a controversy cooked up over a product that's been around for years, the recent outcry over "pink slime" seems to be hitting many businesses where it hurts, most recently causing beef products company AFA Foods Inc. to declare Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The Pennsylvania company is blaming the recent coverage of ammonia-treated boneless lean beef trimmings - variously mocked as “pink slime” or “Soylent Pink” - for its dire financial straits. The business, which is owned by billionaire Ron Burkle's Yucaipa Cos., said it will shut down operations at its California factory while continuing to produce ground beef elsewhere.
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