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Slings And Arrows

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1986
It is about time that someone (e.g., Nathan Rosenberg) actually wants to represent the people of Orange County, instead of being "on vacation." What we need is a voice in Washington, not a traveling figurehead. And, maybe if Rep. Robert E. Badham's record of achievements could stand for itself, then he wouldn't need a six-figure fund-raiser to get reelected. KENNETH GONZALES Costa Mesa
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Ari Gold, the ruthless Hollywood player of HBO's "Entourage," commandeers his agency's conference room with his typical force-of-nature bravado. No longer content with being the planet's most successful agent, he outlines a bold plan for conquest. "I'm bringing an NFL team to Los Angeles!" he proclaims before warning his underlings to keep quiet about the high-level negotiations with Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones: "I'm not threatening your jobs, I'm threatening your lives! I'm serious."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1987
McCarthy is absolutely correct. He hit the dog owner right on top of his empty head. My observation of the dog owner is that of an emotional, spiritual, and intellectual runt. Ego bruised, weakened and, God forbid, even challenged by the slings and arrows of life, they slink home to their one true "friend." They find refuge and strength from a Pavolian salivating, yelping, frightened, territorial-crazed dumb dog. Animal lovers, do yourselves and everybody a favor, allow your values to mature and become people lovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010
A roundup of Friday morning's arts and entertainment headlines: The Rolling Stones' "Exile on Main Street" got re-released, and now Stones are popping up everywhere. (Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, Los Angeles Times) Russell Crowe storms out of a BBC interview after questions about his accent. (Telegraph) "Chuck" and "V" will return in the fall. "FlashForward" and "Better Off Ted" won't. (Los Angeles Times) Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson are putting together a concert with high-frequency music for dogs.
SPORTS
March 27, 1993
Nobody could have said it better than Mike Downey ("He Won't Ride Off Into the Sunset") about Jim Harrick and his three-year contract extension. Jim has had to put up with more "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" than Hamlet, and more mud slung in his direction than a Presidential or mayoral candidate. Yet he perseveres and does what a coach should do on behalf of his team. Three cheers for three more years. CASEY KASEM Los Angeles
OPINION
November 10, 1991
After all the rancor and vitriol had filtered down in that conference room in Madrid, Secretary of State James Baker raised his hands in a time-out signal (Nov. 2). Let's hope that sign will still the venom for all future meetings. The conferees must get on with things of substance. Forget the past's slings and arrows. Forget such petty things as where future meetings will be held. Find neutral sites if those suggested beforehand are not satisfactory. It is an opportunity not to be missed.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1989
I feel the need to respond to the two letters to the editor that appeared in your business section Nov. 12, in response to the article about Mike Milken ("The New Mike Milken," Oct. 15). It has been fashionable for you to find very little of redeeming value in a young man who has not been found guilty of anything to this point in time. After all, didn't you once print a story on the staggering amount of money--some $94 million--that Milken and his family's foundation have distributed?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Ari Gold, the ruthless Hollywood player of HBO's "Entourage," commandeers his agency's conference room with his typical force-of-nature bravado. No longer content with being the planet's most successful agent, he outlines a bold plan for conquest. "I'm bringing an NFL team to Los Angeles!" he proclaims before warning his underlings to keep quiet about the high-level negotiations with Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones: "I'm not threatening your jobs, I'm threatening your lives! I'm serious."
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | MICHAEL KERNAN, The Washington Post
There is a quiet in John Rolfe Gardiner's work. Tell him that and he may take it as a compliment, which it is, but he also acts a little puzzled. For the characters in his new novel, "In the Heart of the Whole World," get all the action they could want: The narrator's teen-age daughter runs a sex club in a mall and very nearly stars in a chain-saw snuff movie.
OPINION
July 10, 1994 | JIM SOLLISCH, Jim Sollisch is a writer in Cleveland
As a writer and former college English instructor, I am often asked to settle heated disputes, to provide a clarifying and measured opinion, to be a voice of reason in the passionate debate of issues that divide us. Just the other day, I was asked to decide a matter of life and death. "Does the term brain dead require a hyphen?" a troubled colleague inquired. My response to these kinds of perplexing questions is almost stock now.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
It might be comforting to believe the old adage about sticks and stones, but truth is: Names hurt. Stripping such words of their power is the aim of college-age performers Miles Gregley, Rafael Agustin and Allan Axibal. As the title for their socially conscious stage show, they've strung together three slurs hurled at their respective communities: "N*gger Wetb*ck Ch*nk."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2003 | Jose Cardenas, Times Staff Writer
Raised in a Christian home in affluent Irvine, Jo Marie Janco's parents instilled in her and her younger brother compassion for the poor. "My parents are Christian and I'm Christian," she said. "Love isn't really anything unless you show it.... It's too much to see this kind of pain without doing anything about it." When the private school girl and her family drove through Los Angeles and Santa Ana, it saddened her to see people who were homeless and were forced to beg for money.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | DAVID L. ULIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Why is everybody so upset with Jonathan Franzen? All he did was to utter publicly what countless other writers have long thought: that the Oprah-ization of American literature may have its problems after all.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | GEORGE SKELTON
Your best day in any administration is Inauguration Day because you're celebrating a wonderful victory and a new beginning. You're partying with friends--and everybody is your friend. You have yet to make a decision that ticks off anybody. That comes the second day. --Attorney Steve Merksamer, former chief aide to Gov. George Deukmejian * "I'm pumped," says Gray Davis, who today takes the oath as California's 37th governor. He's also "humbled," "grateful" and "confident."
BUSINESS
December 18, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Miramax Films founding brothers Harvey and Bob Weinstein may think they've mellowed with age and success, but it's still pretty easy to get their goat. Sitting on the sun-drenched patio of the Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills last Friday, the Weinsteins were beaming, having just read the morning's glowing reviews of their new release, "Shakespeare in Love."
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I embark on this review with great trepidation, since it seems that anyone who talks to or about Julia Phillips becomes fodder for her next book. It is one of the many ironies that are the foundation of this wild, wobbly piece of performance art: To tinker a bit with Tennessee Williams, Phillips has always depended on the unkindness of strangers. And so-called friends. And one-time friends. And ex- or about to be ex-business partners. Her worst nightmares turn into her best-selling books.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Miramax Films founding brothers Harvey and Bob Weinstein may think they've mellowed with age and success, but it's still pretty easy to get their goat. Sitting on the sun-drenched patio of the Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills last Friday, the Weinsteins were beaming, having just read the morning's glowing reviews of their new release, "Shakespeare in Love."
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Gov. Pete Wilson's suite of offices, some brash young staffers, their heads swollen by presidential campaign fever, deride the Democratic tenant in the small office down the hall as Lite Governor. The insult is directed at Gray Davis. As lieutenant governor, Davis would become the governor if Wilson wins. But that if is big.
OPINION
July 10, 1994 | JIM SOLLISCH, Jim Sollisch is a writer in Cleveland
As a writer and former college English instructor, I am often asked to settle heated disputes, to provide a clarifying and measured opinion, to be a voice of reason in the passionate debate of issues that divide us. Just the other day, I was asked to decide a matter of life and death. "Does the term brain dead require a hyphen?" a troubled colleague inquired. My response to these kinds of perplexing questions is almost stock now.
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