Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSlippers
IN THE NEWS

Slippers

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By David Horsey
Tracking the “nip slips” and other wardrobe malfunctions of stars like Tina Fey has become a major focus for the entertainment media, as well as a means for lower-tier celebrities to get more media attention. The fleeting glimpse of a nipple or flash of a pubic region may often be more intentional than accidental. If not, why would someone like Britney Spears or Paris Hilton emerge from a limousine in front of waiting paparazzi wearing a micro-miniskirt and no underwear? Why would rapper Nicki Minaj appear on the Ellen DeGeneres show wearing a short Moschino jacket with only the top button fastened and nothing else to cover her less-than-diminutive bosom?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
Yu Chao Liang and his wife saved a few bucks recently by checking into a mid-price chain hotel in Santa Monica for a two-day business trip from Suzhou, China. But they were not impressed. In the room, they found no slippers, teakettles or complimentary toothpaste - extras that come standard in Chinese hotels. The hot breakfast bar in the lobby was free but it didn't include any of the traditional Chinese breakfast dishes they get back home, like rice porridge. "I can eat almost anything," Yu said, referring to the breakfast at his hotel.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | HERB HAIN
The next problem is certainly no shoo-in for two readers. Frieda Block of Culver City can no longer find high-cut terry cotton bedroom slippers bonded to quarter-inch rubber soles; the last pair she found was available at Sears in Santa Monica and washed beautifully. To add a footnote, Kathryn Novak of Los Angeles is still looking for Daniel Green house slippers with the high-wedge heel in Size 6C.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By David Horsey
Tracking the “nip slips” and other wardrobe malfunctions of stars like Tina Fey has become a major focus for the entertainment media, as well as a means for lower-tier celebrities to get more media attention. The fleeting glimpse of a nipple or flash of a pubic region may often be more intentional than accidental. If not, why would someone like Britney Spears or Paris Hilton emerge from a limousine in front of waiting paparazzi wearing a micro-miniskirt and no underwear? Why would rapper Nicki Minaj appear on the Ellen DeGeneres show wearing a short Moschino jacket with only the top button fastened and nothing else to cover her less-than-diminutive bosom?
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | From Reuters
Muslim fundamentalists fought in the streets of Dhaka on Friday, pelting stones at shoe shops selling rubber slippers bearing a motif that apparently resembled the Arabic characters spelling Allah. At least 50 people were injured in the protest, called by student and youth groups after newspapers printed pictures of the slipper made by the Canadian shoe company Bata. The government had already ordered the confiscation of all the offending slippers. Bata said the motif on the shoes, intended to depict "hanging bells," had been mistaken for Arabic writing familiar throughout the Muslim world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1988
Regarding the sale of Judy Garland's slippers from the movie "The Wizard of Oz" ("Movie Memorabilia Fetch Record Prices," by Rhys Thomas, June 22), while I found the article interesting, I was disturbed that you found it necessary to discuss the fact that a previous owner had apparently died "of AIDS." I do not see how this has any relevance to the article. Including this information was sensationalistic, insensitive and an invasion of privacy. D. GOULD Los Angeles
NEWS
August 16, 1985 | MARYLOU LUTHER, Times Fashion Editor
Question: I keep reading about the hooded look for fall, but can't find anything in the stores. I'm looking for a hooded sweater, size 10. I'm very tall (6 feet), so I'd prefer a long one. Can you help?--S.G. Answer: You may not have recognized them as such in the bins, but there are many hooded sweaters in the stores now. Their deep cowl collars pull up over the head to become hoods, as in the one illustrated here.
NEWS
November 23, 1988
Butte County investigators are attempting to determine what caused the death of a woman whose body was found in a rugged Sierra foothills canyon after wild animals had mangled and eaten portions of it. Sheriff's deputies located the body of Lucy Dunton, 51, of Sacramento during an aerial search, Assistant Sheriff Mick Grey said. The remains were in Butte Creek Canyon, about 2,000 yards from where Dunton's slippers and coat had been found earlier. She had been missing for nine days.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2003
I was disgusted to read the article "Hollywood Holidays" (by Booth Moore and Gina Piccalo, Dec. 20). This showed me more proof about how our American culture has its values mixed up. Why is it that we place so much value on entertainment that these people can give and receive such extravagant gifts? Instead of wearing $140 slippers while their dogs wear $75 dog booties, it would be nice to see L.A. city high school students not having to share textbooks. I bet $2,500 worth of textbooks would get a lot more use than a $2,500 espresso machine.
NEWS
December 26, 1985 | HERB HAIN
For a grandson, Eileen Coughlin of Lomita wants to buy a child's carpenter belt with tools. Can you help nail down a source, or will Coughlin just have to keep hammering away until this gut-wrenching task is finished? Libbie Barach of Los Angeles needs a wall-mounted soap-and-lotion dispenser for a bathroom with limited counter space. She'd prefer a dispenser that doesn't look commercial.
IMAGE
December 30, 2012 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Sensible shoes Flat smoking slippers in velvet or satin and wedge sneakers with studs and straps overtook sky-high platforms in the fashionable footwear race. Artful nails Whether it was tiny Union Jacks, tuxedos, stripes, crystal flowers or caviar pearls, nail art went from the subculture sidelines to becoming an everyday indulgence, and not just for flamboyant pop stars like Nicki Minaj and Lady Gaga. The boom was due in part to nail technology advances, including new, easy-to-apply nail decals and gel-color manicures, which allow for long-lasting decoration, including gradated glitter and stripes, as well as crystal and charm appliques.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The ruby slippers are taking off, and not by a click of the heel either. A pair of the iconic shoes worn by Judy Garland in the 1939 film "The Wizard of Oz" will leave the Smithsonian for the first time to be displayed in London in an exhibition titled "Hollywood Costume. " The shoes usually live at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., but will be on loan for four weeks to the Victoria & Albert Museum . There they will be on display alongside Scarlett O'Hara's green "curtain" dress from "Gone With the Wind" (1939)
BUSINESS
March 2, 2011 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
The latest fad in the frou-frou world of pampering isn't a new thermal seaweed wrap, mud bath or cucumber-infused mineral water. It's doing away with them. For years, typical treatments at elite spa establishments could easily run $125 or more for a one-hour massage. The new normal: Less than $50, and sometimes as low as 20 bucks. "It's no longer an indulgence," said Candy Boroditsky, 65, after receiving a $49, 50-minute Swedish massage at Massage Envy in Marina del Rey. "It used to be people who made a certain amount of money ?
IMAGE
January 31, 2010 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Glass footwear has long been synonymous with a romance between a fairy-godmother-assisted girl and a handsome prince but far too fragile and fantastical to ever exist in real life. Until now. Pasquale Fabrizio, owner of Pasquale Shoe Repair in Los Angeles, has doctored the shoes of celebrities, costume designers and fashion industry insiders for the last 17 years. Combining his expertise in reconstructing designer footwear and his passion for Murano glass pieces, Fabrizio has created a line of glass-adorned shoes ornate enough for a princess and with a royal price tag to match.
IMAGE
June 7, 2009 | Melissa Magsaysay
It's easy for imagination to fail when it comes to finding gifts for Father's Day (witness the land-office business in ties and tube socks). But writer Cooper Ray, creator of Social Primer -- a website dedicated to bringing back traditional manners for men -- is practiced in remedying that.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
This will shock you. So please put aside cynicism for a moment. Yes, Los Angeles Opera has remounted Marta Domingo's well-worn first production of Verdi's "La Traviata" with a non-star cast in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Yes, the conductor was the company's associate conductor in his company debut Thursday night. Yes, the company will, of course, run this popular opera, with changing casts, for a month in hopes of raising as much cash as it can to help support its costly "Ring" cycle.
IMAGE
June 7, 2009 | Melissa Magsaysay
It's easy for imagination to fail when it comes to finding gifts for Father's Day (witness the land-office business in ties and tube socks). But writer Cooper Ray, creator of Social Primer -- a website dedicated to bringing back traditional manners for men -- is practiced in remedying that.
NEWS
August 20, 2002 | JEANNE MARIE LASKAS, WASHINGTON POST
A new boyfriend debut is, of course, the single most thrilling event to be shared among loyal and caring and inquiring-minds-want-to-know girlfriends. It's what we live for. It's what we've worked so hard for. It's the beautiful manifestation of all that talking we did over all those years while we imagined and erased and imagined ... the One. "So, is he the One?" Kathryn asks. "Oh, please," Linda says, throwing her hand up dismissively. "He's just someone ... I've been seeing," she says.
HEALTH
August 4, 2008 | Margaret Woodbury, Special to The Times
Germ-conscious consumers are always looking for ways to increase their comfort level. In the 1990s, antibacterial soaps, lotions and potions saturated the marketplace. Now comes another germ-killing innovation -- nanosilver. Silver, the metal, has long been used as an antimicrobial, killing germs by very slowly releasing silver ions that are toxic to bacteria. But now, via nanotechnology, silver can be revamped into minuscule particles a few ten-thousandths the diameter of a human hair.
HOME & GARDEN
July 3, 2008 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
WITH GAS prices what they are, it's not surprising people want a shorter commute. Artist Nancy Evans and woodworker Tucker Strasser now have it: To get to work, they walk down a flight of bright blue metal stairs. The couple bought a Venice building -- a 25-foot-wide, 80-foot-deep storefront space that was in foreclosure -- on a small street just off Abbot Kinney Boulevard.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|