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Sloan Digital Sky Survey

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October 15, 2008 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
It's fair to say that Dan Long has seen more of the universe than anyone but God. Month after month, year after year, Long has sat in a windowless room atop a windy mountain peak, watching the heavens scroll by on 12 monitors connected to the Apache Point Observatory's 98-inch telescope. He saw stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies banded together like giant herds of animals on an unending savanna roll by. Less frequently, exotic denizens of deep space would pop up -- blinding quasars and supernovae, flaring up as brightly on the bank of TV screens as entire galaxies.
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SCIENCE
October 15, 2008 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
It's fair to say that Dan Long has seen more of the universe than anyone but God. Month after month, year after year, Long has sat in a windowless room atop a windy mountain peak, watching the heavens scroll by on 12 monitors connected to the Apache Point Observatory's 98-inch telescope. He saw stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies banded together like giant herds of animals on an unending savanna roll by. Less frequently, exotic denizens of deep space would pop up -- blinding quasars and supernovae, flaring up as brightly on the bank of TV screens as entire galaxies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2000
An international team of astronomers has identified three new brown dwarfs that are intermediate in character between the warm and cool brown dwarfs that are already well known. Astronomers had previously identified young, warm brown dwarfs, which look very much like stars, and old, cool brown dwarfs, which are similar to planets.
SCIENCE
January 7, 2003 | From Associated Press
Like a celestial bully, the Milky Way may have ripped apart a smaller galaxy billions of years ago and scattered its stars into a faint surrounding ring. A survey scanning the outskirts of the Milky Way has found a belt of stars different in chemistry and in motion from stars within the galaxy, suggesting that they are the remnants of a galactic collision that may have occurred 10 billion years ago.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Reuters
Astronomers peering across the universe have spotted the most distant object ever observed, a quasar 26 billion light-years away, researchers said Thursday. This quasar, confirmed as the most faraway object by scientists working with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, probably started sending its light in Earth's direction when the universe was less than 1 billion years old, the researchers said in a statement.
SCIENCE
November 14, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
Scientists have added a new member to the stellar zoo, a type of white dwarf star that had been long predicted but never before found. White dwarfs are end-of-life stars that have burned up most of their nuclear fuel and shrunk to the size of Earth. Other stars shrink further, collapsing into neutron stars smaller than Los Angeles. The new type of star, called an oxygen-rich white dwarf, is a kind of "missing link" between the so-called normal white dwarfs and neutron stars, according to study coauthor Boris Gaensicke, a physicist at the University of Warwick in Britain.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | ALEX DOMINGUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A new telescope that uses the same chips found in many home video cameras will provide the most extensive survey ever of about 25% of the sky. Researchers hope that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey scheduled to begin late this year or early next year will reveal clues about the structure and beginning of the universe. The project, which will be conducted at Apache Point Observatory near Sunspot, N.M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A multinational team of astronomers said Monday they have peered for the first time into the "dark ages" of the universe--an epoch so ancient that the stars and galaxies now sparkling throughout the night sky had yet to form. The finding suggests that after the universe formed some 13 billion years ago, it remained a foggy wasteland for 900 million years. Only then did the gas that pervaded the universe after the Big Bang begin to coalesce into stars and galaxies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001 | From the Baltimore Sun
Arthur F. Davidsen, astrophysicist whose experiments aboard rockets and the space shuttle were fundamental in fathoming the structure of the universe, has died. He was 57. Davidsen, who made his Johns Hopkins University a world leader in the field of astronomy, died Thursday in Baltimore of complications from a lung disorder.
NEWS
March 10, 1995
In the news: Comic Jenny Church, on the declining value of the dollar: "It took such a sudden dive that Alan Greenspan got the bends." Adds David Letterman: "It's falling faster than Leona Helmsley's face." Comic Argus Hamilton, on the GOP bickering and threatening to break up this week: "The Republicans had better stop acting like a broken family or the Democrats will offer them welfare." Comedy writer Paul Ryan, on Democrats demanding that Sen.
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