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Slobodan Bobo Zivojinovic

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September 21, 1989 | THOMAS BONK
Nine years ago, Slobodan (Bobo) Zivojinovic was a 6-foot-6, 200-pound center for his high school team in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. While Zivojinovic was playing tennis Wednesday in the Volvo/Los Angeles tournament, another more current Yugoslav center was watching. Vlade Divac, 21, the Lakers' top draft choice from Belgrade, walked down to the front row and talked to Zivojinovic after the match. They had also had a long conversation the night before.
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SPORTS
September 21, 1989 | THOMAS BONK
Nine years ago, Slobodan (Bobo) Zivojinovic was a 6-foot-6, 200-pound center for his high school team in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. While Zivojinovic was playing tennis Wednesday in the Volvo/Los Angeles tournament, another more current Yugoslav center was watching. Vlade Divac, 21, the Lakers' top draft choice from Belgrade, walked down to the front row and talked to Zivojinovic after the match. They had also had a long conversation the night before.
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SPORTS
July 1, 1987 | Scott Ostler
When Slobodan (Bobo) Zivojinovic is on his game, which isn't often, except almost always at Wimbledon, nobody is safe. Bobo Zivojinovic stands 6 foot 4, weighs 223 pounds and serves the ball with approximately the same finesse as a carnival patron trying to ring the bell and win a Kewpie doll. Bobo the Barbarian has what you would call a big serve. At least it sounds big. In his first-round match last week, Bobo served an ace. The ball took one hop and skulled a woman line judge.
SPORTS
July 1, 1987 | Scott Ostler
When Slobodan (Bobo) Zivojinovic is on his game, which isn't often, except almost always at Wimbledon, nobody is safe. Bobo Zivojinovic stands 6 foot 4, weighs 223 pounds and serves the ball with approximately the same finesse as a carnival patron trying to ring the bell and win a Kewpie doll. Bobo the Barbarian has what you would call a big serve. At least it sounds big. In his first-round match last week, Bobo served an ace. The ball took one hop and skulled a woman line judge.
SPORTS
July 2, 1987 | SCOTT OSTLER, Times Staff Writer
Jimmy Connors and the Princess of Wales, everyone's favorite mixed doubles team, thrilled the Wimbledon throngs Wednesday with exciting appearances, as what once seemed to be shaping up as a boring tournament steamed toward a pip of a finish. Princess Di appeared in the Royal Box on Centre Court for the first time this year, without Prince Charles, and looking splendid in a bright red-and-white polka-dot dress.
SPORTS
June 30, 1987 | Scott Ostler
When Peter Pan--or Peter Doohan, or whatever his name is--beat Boris Becker in the upset of our times last Friday, Peter's agent started talking about exploring commercial possibilities for his client. Sure, hey, Peter should be endorsing things. But what? Minute Rice? Two-day deodorant pads? Sand castles? Disappearing ink? Peter Flash-in-the-Pan didn't figure to be around long.
SPORTS
June 23, 1986 | MIKE DOWNEY
I have come to good Britain--it will not get any better until the sun comes out--to see who will win the Wimbledon singles championships, operating under the assumption that at least one of these individuals has a birth certificate on file in Czechoslovakia. Martina Navratilova is overdue to lose here, and Ivan Lendl is overdue to win here.
SPORTS
July 3, 1986 | MIKE DOWNEY, Times Staff Writer
It turned out to be true. It is no longer safe for Americans in Europe. Wimbledon will be without an American in the men's final for the first time since 1976, and without one in the semifinals for the first time since 1970. Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia, Boris Becker of West Germany, Henri Leconte of France and Slobodan (Bobo) Zivojinovic of Yugoslavia advanced Wednesday, while Tim Mayotte, the last Yankee, went home.
SPORTS
July 1, 1986 | MIKE DOWNEY, Times Staff Writer
Princess Di picked a pretty good day. She put on something white--which is what the well-dressed Wimbledonian wears, luv --and then parked it in the royal box Monday, to enjoy a spot of tennis. Whether she wore tennis shoes , we could not tell. But Diana was accompanied by somebody called Lady Keswick, not by her husband. Charles was probably out playing a couple of sets himself, using a Prince racket. Anyway, she saw a battle royal.
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