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Slobodan Milosevic

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1996
Nothing more clearly highlights the hypocrisy of President Clinton's Bosnia policy than his administration's attempt to pressure Serbian "strongman" Slobodan Milosevic to turn over accused war criminals for trial. Milosevic himself is a war criminal of monstrous proportions. As the architect of the ethnic cleansing perpetrated against non-Serbs, it is he who should be charged and extradited. He is instead courted by our government. The time for negotiating with the Serbs ended long ago. The United States and NATO should end this farce and forcibly liberate Bosnia and Serbia from those who committed genocide while sneering at the paralysis of a stunned world.
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WORLD
March 25, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Air raid sirens sounded across Serbia to mark the 10th anniversary of the NATO bombing that ended Belgrade's rule in Kosovo. Officials denounced the raids, which NATO carried out to force then-President Slobodan Milosevic to halt his onslaught against separatists in the former Serbian province. Classes in Serbia's schools opened with a minute of silence for the victims. The government held a special session dedicated to the anniversary.
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OPINION
February 12, 2002 | MARKO LOPUSINA and ANDRE HUZSVAI
The Balkans is a strange place: Nothing is what it seems to be. In June 2001, after nearly a decade of bloodshed and related media frenzy, Slobodan Milosevic was arrested and transferred to The Hague for trial. Thus ended the public relations phase of the hunt, giving way to indictments for war crimes in Kosovo, Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
WORLD
June 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The son of late Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic was acquitted of charges that he had harassed and beaten his father's political opponents in 2000. The court in the family's hometown of Pozarevac in Serbia cited insufficient evidence and what it said was a lack of intent when it decided to clear Marko Milosevic of all charges. Judge Gordana Vidojkovic said it was unclear who was responsible for the beatings of the activists with the student group Otpor, which was challenging Slobodan Milosevic's presidency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2000
Yugoslavia's new president, Vojislav Kostunica, and his 18-party front, the Democratic Opposition of Serbia, acted with breathtaking speed last week in removing Slobodan Milosevic from power. Now Kostunica's problems begin. He will have to deal decisively with Milosevic and his cronies, hold together a quarrelsome group of parties, each with its own political ambitions, and normalize relations with ethnic Kosovars and Serbia's neighbors.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hot bestseller in Serbia these days is not a manual on how to get a man, nor the story of a celebrity trial. At bookstores not owned by the government, and especially at street-corner kiosks, the book that has captured the attention of Serbs is a new expose on the ruling couple--President Slobodan Milosevic and his influential, reviled neo-Communist wife, Mirjana Markovic.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely five months ago, he seemed a wounded politician struggling to maintain his authoritarian rule. On Tuesday, Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic was elected president of Yugoslavia, ensuring a place in power probably well into the next century. Milosevic was the only candidate and won a near-unanimous vote in the rump Yugoslavia's two-house parliament in the Yugoslav capital, Belgrade. His Socialist Party holds a plurality of seats and managed to block any competing candidacies.
OPINION
February 21, 2008
Re "U.S., many in EU recognize Kosovo," Feb. 19 Kosovo declares independence, and nations with disaffected minorities such as Russia and China cry bad precedent. We need to remember the causative event: Slobodan Milosevic, with violence and threat of destruction, tried to expel Albanian Kosovars from their ancestral home. Similar to the Holocaust, this is an event that changed history. To all nations with disaffected minorities, including the U.S.: Don't think that violence or repression will change history in your favor.
WORLD
March 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A key aide to former Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic has been arrested for allegedly siphoning millions of dollars of state money, police said. Former customs chief Mihalj Kertes, a key player during the late president's decade-long rule in the 1990s, was detained on a request from Serbia's prosecutor for organized crime, police said.
WORLD
March 18, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Barely 12 hours before he died, former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic sat in his small prison office amid stacks of court papers that smelled of cigarette smoke and coffee. Milosevic looked weak as he worked with a former ally to prepare his defense against war crimes charges. His ears were ringing, and for the last three days he had felt particularly ill.
WORLD
March 12, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin and Zoran Cirjakovic, Special to The Times
Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was found dead Saturday in the prison cell where he had spent his final years facing trial on genocide and war crimes charges for his role in the nationalist wars that racked the Balkans in the 1990s.
WORLD
September 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Belgrade ordered the arrest of the wife of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic for failing to attend her corruption trial in the capital. Mirjana Markovic has been in self-imposed exile in Russia since 2003. She has been accused of illegally giving away government-owned luxury apartments. Markovic is also wanted for questioning in connection with the 2000 slaying of former Serbian President Ivan Stambolic.
WORLD
November 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic can once again lead his own defense at the U.N. war crimes tribunal but must accept a standby lawyer in case he becomes too ill to continue, appeals judges ruled. Milosevic has been on trial since 2002 at The Hague on charges that include genocide. Judges imposed a defense lawyer against Milosevic's will after doctors said the defendant could be at risk for a heart attack.
WORLD
October 28, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's court-appointed lawyers have asked to quit his war crimes trial because they cannot properly defend an unwilling client. Steven Kay and his assistant, Gillian Higgins, submitted applications to the United Nations tribunal's registrar at The Hague seeking to withdraw, said spokesman Jim Landale. They will remain as defense counsel until the tribunal removes them, he said.
WORLD
October 13, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Returning to a courtroom in The Hague after a monthlong break, former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic sounded a familiar refrain, asking the war crimes tribunal to let him fire his court-appointed lawyer and represent himself. The request was denied. Presiding Judge Patrick Robinson told Steven Kay, the appointed defense attorney, to continue questioning his witness, a German journalist who reported on the 1999 war in Kosovo.
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