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Slobodan Milosovic

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NEWS
August 12, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that President Slobodan Milosevic is leading Yugoslavia into "certain disaster," Serbian Orthodox Church leaders formally called on him Wednesday to resign. The church joined the growing opposition movement trying to oust Milosevic after a synod of bishops decided that he and Serbian President Milan Milutinovic are "turning their own people into hostages."
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NEWS
August 12, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that President Slobodan Milosevic is leading Yugoslavia into "certain disaster," Serbian Orthodox Church leaders formally called on him Wednesday to resign. The church joined the growing opposition movement trying to oust Milosevic after a synod of bishops decided that he and Serbian President Milan Milutinovic are "turning their own people into hostages."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2001
In "Beef Up the Taliban's Enemy" (Commentary, Sept. 20) Daniel Byman, Kenneth Pollack and Gideon Rose demonstrate the foreign policy planning rut our leaders have been stuck in since the start of the Cold War. Support for the "enemies of our enemies" led the U.S. into alliances with such paragons of democracy as Saddam Hussein, Gens. Manuel Noriega and Augusto Pinochet, the Shah of Iran and Osama bin Laden himself. Our enemies' enemies are not our friends, and in the long term, associations with illegitimate powers only come back to haunt us in devastating ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999 | MICHAEL LEDEEN, Michael Ledeen is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and author of the just published "Machiavelli on Modern Leadership" (St. Martin's Press)
Never mind all the facile talk about ground forces, as if this were the siege of Stalingrad. Were we serious about improving the lot of the hundreds of thousands of miserable people either massacred by the Serb mobile killing units or fleeing the Serbs toward Albania and Macedonia, we would have sent our superb Special Forces into Kosovo to hunt and destroy the killers. Indeed, this is a textbook mission for the Special Forces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1999 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her first name means luck, and Igball Hoxha considers herself fortunate to have made it out of Kosovo alive with her son, Kushtrim. Fearing for their lives, the two ethnic Albanians were desperate to flee their home and the oppression of the Serbian military. Now they have found sanctuary through the help of St. Anselm's Cross Cultural Center in Garden Grove. The nonprofit agency, run by St. Anselm's Episcopal Church, provides immigration and resettlement services.
OPINION
February 27, 2000 | David Brooks, David Brooks is a senior editor at the Weekly Standard. He is the author of "Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There," due out in May
We don't know where Arizona Sen. John McCain's campaign will land, but we can pinpoint when it took off. About a year ago, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosovic was cleansing Kosovo of ethnic Albanians. There were reports of massacres and gang rapes and forced marches. The Clinton administration was gearing up to do something about it. The House Republicans were at cross purposes--pretty sure that whatever President Bill Clinton did, they'd be against it. Texas Gov. George W.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | BETH WHITEHOUSE, NEWSDAY
From a home cluttered with family photographs, Richard Holbrooke plucks a framed copy of a newspaper article written in Turkish. His wife, author Kati Marton, is featured in a large photograph. In an inset photo, minuscule compared to hers, is Holbrooke. He is amused by how the Turkish paper presented their images during their trip through the region in 1995. The paper had spurned him, the man President Clinton was counting on to strong-arm a peace agreement in Bosnia, in favor of her.
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