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Slot Car Racing

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NEWS
August 26, 1985 | MIKE EBERTS, Eberts, a USC graduate student, is a Times summer intern
Eight brightly colored cars swarm into Turn One sounding like a herd of electric razors gone berserk. It is not a pretty sight. Cars careen into one another and spin off the track. One flips end over end. Mike Brannian, 34 and runner-up to the state professional champion in 1979, predicts a rough-and-tumble race. "Half of them won't get out of the first turn," he says warily from track-side. It has been a long night of qualifying, punctuated by numerous crashes.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1995 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every now again, a holiday gift comes along that can change your life. Just ask John Androsko. A little more than a year ago, his wife gave him a colorful miniature race car for Christmas. More specifically, it was a slot car--a tiny, electrically powered speedster that can be run only on a special track. Androsko took the car to a slot car track near his Fullerton home. Racing the car through hairpin turns and at blinding speeds down a straightaway, the 33-year-old became hooked.
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NEWS
June 11, 1992 | VINCE KOWALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Navigating the high-banked turns and sprawling straightaways of a slot-car race course can drive a person crazy. Sometimes, when a car flies off the track, its operator flies off the handle. "You hear a lot of screaming and stuff like 'Get that car back on the track!' and 'Hurry up!' " said Brian Tait of Simi Valley, a 35-year-old professional drag-racer almost as passionate about slot-car racing. "It gets pretty heated."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1995 | From Associated Press
The sound is amazing--like a platoon of electric razors shifted into overdrive, or maybe a swarm of bees trapped in a jar. It's the whine of tiny motors being pushed well beyond what nature ever intended. If you were around in the late '60s or early '70s when slot-car racing had its first go-round, the buzz has a nostalgic sound. The high-speed, model-car hobby is essentially the same. Tracks snake like huge plywood-and-plastic pretzels across large expanses of floor.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1995 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every now again, a holiday gift comes along that can change your life. Just ask John Androsko. A little more than a year ago, his wife gave him a colorful miniature race car for Christmas. More specifically, it was a slot car--a tiny, electrically powered speedster that can be run only on a special track. Androsko took the car to a slot car track near his Fullerton home. Racing the car through hairpin turns and at blinding speeds down a straightaway, the 33-year-old became hooked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1995 | From Associated Press
The sound is amazing--like a platoon of electric razors shifted into overdrive, or maybe a swarm of bees trapped in a jar. It's the whine of tiny motors being pushed well beyond what nature ever intended. If you were around in the late '60s or early '70s when slot-car racing had its first go-round, the buzz has a nostalgic sound. The high-speed, model-car hobby is essentially the same. Tracks snake like huge plywood-and-plastic pretzels across large expanses of floor.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The slightly nerdy hobby of slot-car racing was originally confined to garages and rumpus rooms, and perhaps rightly so. But the '50s fad, which has drifted in and out of popularity over the years, has resurfaced, spawning about a dozen new storefront race tracks across the city where drivers go shoulder-to-shoulder, their plastic cars whizzing around elaborate courses. Cruzin', in Tarzana, is one such spot. It's a wide, bright room with paintings of race cars on the walls.
NEWS
November 30, 2000 | KAREN JONES, karen@kjnyc.com
As the computer and toy industries come together, parents will see more interactive toys on the market. Interactive toys, which merge traditional toys with computer technology, can encompass everything from simple plastic attachments that snap onto a computer keyboard to robotic dogs, laptops, car-racing simulations and more. There are certain guidelines a parent should follow in purchasing an interactive toy.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | APRIL JACKSON
Brad Silletto and Allen Mayea are a couple of regular guys who just wanted to make the world a better place. So, they opened an eight-lane 100-foot-long hill climb racetrack for slot cars. The thirtysomething duo, whose rallying cry could be, "If you build a slot car race track, they will come," have had their shop, Slots of Fun Raceway in Fountain Valley, open for slightly longer than a month and are already planning their first expansion.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | ERIK HAMILTON
Cars, clothes and conversation change over the decades, but one fact remains the same: Teen-agers have always found the time to hang out together outside of school. Here's a brief list of popular local hangouts, and--if they're still standing--what they have become. Happy Days in the 1950s Hi-Way 39 Drive-In Theater: A place to show off your car or your date, it's still operating in Westminster.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The slightly nerdy hobby of slot-car racing was originally confined to garages and rumpus rooms, and perhaps rightly so. But the '50s fad, which has drifted in and out of popularity over the years, has resurfaced, spawning about a dozen new storefront race tracks across the city where drivers go shoulder-to-shoulder, their plastic cars whizzing around elaborate courses. Cruzin', in Tarzana, is one such spot. It's a wide, bright room with paintings of race cars on the walls.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | VINCE KOWALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Navigating the high-banked turns and sprawling straightaways of a slot-car race course can drive a person crazy. Sometimes, when a car flies off the track, its operator flies off the handle. "You hear a lot of screaming and stuff like 'Get that car back on the track!' and 'Hurry up!' " said Brian Tait of Simi Valley, a 35-year-old professional drag-racer almost as passionate about slot-car racing. "It gets pretty heated."
NEWS
August 26, 1985 | MIKE EBERTS, Eberts, a USC graduate student, is a Times summer intern
Eight brightly colored cars swarm into Turn One sounding like a herd of electric razors gone berserk. It is not a pretty sight. Cars careen into one another and spin off the track. One flips end over end. Mike Brannian, 34 and runner-up to the state professional champion in 1979, predicts a rough-and-tumble race. "Half of them won't get out of the first turn," he says warily from track-side. It has been a long night of qualifying, punctuated by numerous crashes.
FOOD
September 29, 1994 | JONATHAN GOLD
"Since I had forgotten to bring along a bag of pemmican, I would have to eat in Los Angeles--a fairly exact definition of the term 'the kiss of death.' " --S. J. Perelman The old Captain's Table may have served the best lobster west of Maine, I've heard, and the cream Senegalese at Chasen's could have been the next thing to a sundae at Wil Wright's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2005 | Natasha Lee, Times Staff Writer
Behind the black-tinted windows of a Buena Park storefront, electric-powered slot cars whiz around a grooved, wooden track, crossing the finish line in the blink of an eye -- and giving boys in their 40s and 50s the biggest rush of their week. Never mind the fast-paced video games favored by their children; this cadre of aging slot-car enthusiasts clings to a hobby that, for the most part, hit the skids about three decades ago.
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