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Slovakia Czechoslovakia

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NEWS
February 23, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadlock among Czechoslovak politicians over Slovak nationalist demands now seems likely to persist until after parliamentary elections in June, political figures here have concluded, and the controversy could cast a shadow over the country's economic reforms and the political future of President Vaclav Havel.
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NEWS
February 23, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadlock among Czechoslovak politicians over Slovak nationalist demands now seems likely to persist until after parliamentary elections in June, political figures here have concluded, and the controversy could cast a shadow over the country's economic reforms and the political future of President Vaclav Havel.
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NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Slovaks rallied Friday to protest the country's new name, which does not have a hyphen to distinguish Slovaks from the dominant Czechs. The national Parliament voted Thursday night to drop the word Socialist designation from the country's name and call the nation the Czechoslovak Federative Republic. That set off daylong protests in Bratislava, the capital of the Slovak republic. Parliament agreed to allow the Slovaks to write the new name with a hyphen.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Slovaks rallied Friday to protest the country's new name, which does not have a hyphen to distinguish Slovaks from the dominant Czechs. The national Parliament voted Thursday night to drop the word Socialist designation from the country's name and call the nation the Czechoslovak Federative Republic. That set off daylong protests in Bratislava, the capital of the Slovak republic. Parliament agreed to allow the Slovaks to write the new name with a hyphen.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | MARK J. PORUBCANSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Only her well and a shed stand between Maria Hospodarova and the gray village church of St. Michael the Archangel, which used to be hers, but a 1,000-year chasm of distrust is unbridgeable. For the devout Orthodox Christian, walking to St. Michael next door has become pointless since the majority Catholics reclaimed it in 1990. "I cannot be a Greek Catholic," said Hospodarova, 58, a retired collective farm worker. "It is impossible for me."
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High school students at a museum exhibit on Stalinist-era political executions clustered around Julian Gluchowski, peppering him with questions about his years in jail. "My bones weren't broken or my fingernails pulled out, but very often I heard screams at night of other people being tortured," said the 64-year-old Gluchowski, imprisoned in his late teens for anti-Communist agitation. The students hung on every word.
SPORTS
March 31, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a historic day for Czechoslovakia, which was blessed with two new names and one new tennis star all within about 12 hours. The name came first, announced Friday morning as a compromise between the Czechs and the Slovaks. In the Czech region of the country, the name will be the Czechoslovak Federative Republic. The Slovaks will call it the Czecho-slovak Federative Republic. It might have been the first time that a civil war was averted by a hyphen.
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