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Slovakia Government

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NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Klaus, the likely prime minister after weekend elections in Czechoslovakia, said Sunday that he will begin negotiations today with his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, on the formation of a new government. Klaus spoke with reporters after a two-hour meeting with President Vaclav Havel. Presidential aides said Havel instructed Klaus to begin the process of putting together a government.
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NEWS
September 28, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Triumphant opposition leaders claimed victory Sunday after two days of voting for a new Slovakian parliament, predicting they will soon take power in a transition that could strengthen this nation's democracy and speed its entry into European institutions. Four allied opposition parties won 93 of 150 seats in the Friday and Saturday balloting, according to early results announced Sunday.
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NEWS
September 28, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Triumphant opposition leaders claimed victory Sunday after two days of voting for a new Slovakian parliament, predicting they will soon take power in a transition that could strengthen this nation's democracy and speed its entry into European institutions. Four allied opposition parties won 93 of 150 seats in the Friday and Saturday balloting, according to early results announced Sunday.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Critics say Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar of Slovakia runs an authoritarian political machine based on patronage, corruption, heavy-handed pressure and disrespect for democratic rules. But such rebukes didn't seem to concern his mostly gray-haired supporters at a rally early this week ahead of crucial parliamentary elections today and Saturday. They cheered Meciar as a hero, a talented leader and a patriot who led their nation to independence.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Being the son of the president has its benefits, particularly for a budding entrepreneur hoping to make a killing in the rough-and-tumble markets of newly capitalist Central Europe. Michal Kovac Jr., the son of Slovak President Michal Kovac, enjoys instant name recognition. He gets high-powered invitations. And he does not lack for business associates, especially those wanting to exploit his familial connections.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apprehension is growing among economists and Western diplomats that Yugoslavia's economic reform program, which has achieved at least limited success in beating back inflation and stabilizing the currency, may be running up against the brick wall of Yugoslav nationalism. The reform plan introduced by federal Prime Minister Ante Markovic, elected in 1989, has been praised by Yugoslavs for its success in curbing inflation, which exceeded 2,600% a year when he took over.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | From Reuters
The Slovak government defied a constitutional court Tuesday and provoked charges that Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar was establishing totalitarian rule by saying it will cancel a planned referendum on the presidency. The move came hours after President Michal Kovac, one of Meciar's fiercest critics, stepped down at the end of his term with no successor in place. Meciar was left to take over most of Kovac's powers.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Critics say Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar of Slovakia runs an authoritarian political machine based on patronage, corruption, heavy-handed pressure and disrespect for democratic rules. But such rebukes didn't seem to concern his mostly gray-haired supporters at a rally early this week ahead of crucial parliamentary elections today and Saturday. They cheered Meciar as a hero, a talented leader and a patriot who led their nation to independence.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ladislav Chudik has always loved opening fan mail. Some even comes adoringly addressed to "Dr. Sova," the gentlemanly surgeon he portrayed in a hit 1970s television series. So it was with considerable agony that Chudik recently displayed a bundle of correspondence tucked away in his dressing room at the Slovak National Theater. These letters were different--so ghastly that their very mention drained the life from his smile. "A swine like you will always be a swine," one postcard cursed.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Kanska summoned her two adult daughters to a family meeting a few weeks ago and warned them she was about to become a dissident. "I told them they might want to think about getting married and changing their names, so as not to be associated with me or punished for the noise I'm going to make," the college business professor recalled. "I cannot sit by quietly and watch my country commit suicide."
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | From Reuters
The Slovak government defied a constitutional court Tuesday and provoked charges that Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar was establishing totalitarian rule by saying it will cancel a planned referendum on the presidency. The move came hours after President Michal Kovac, one of Meciar's fiercest critics, stepped down at the end of his term with no successor in place. Meciar was left to take over most of Kovac's powers.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ladislav Chudik has always loved opening fan mail. Some even comes adoringly addressed to "Dr. Sova," the gentlemanly surgeon he portrayed in a hit 1970s television series. So it was with considerable agony that Chudik recently displayed a bundle of correspondence tucked away in his dressing room at the Slovak National Theater. These letters were different--so ghastly that their very mention drained the life from his smile. "A swine like you will always be a swine," one postcard cursed.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Being the son of the president has its benefits, particularly for a budding entrepreneur hoping to make a killing in the rough-and-tumble markets of newly capitalist Central Europe. Michal Kovac Jr., the son of Slovak President Michal Kovac, enjoys instant name recognition. He gets high-powered invitations. And he does not lack for business associates, especially those wanting to exploit his familial connections.
NEWS
January 26, 1993
Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar's choice for the country's presidency, Roman Kovac, will probably get the job eventually, but it is likely to take at least two rounds of voting and some political wrestling by a divided and divisive Slovak Parliament for him to gain the necessary 60% majority over Communist and Christian Democratic opponents.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Kanska summoned her two adult daughters to a family meeting a few weeks ago and warned them she was about to become a dissident. "I told them they might want to think about getting married and changing their names, so as not to be associated with me or punished for the noise I'm going to make," the college business professor recalled. "I cannot sit by quietly and watch my country commit suicide."
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Klaus, the likely prime minister after weekend elections in Czechoslovakia, said Sunday that he will begin negotiations today with his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, on the formation of a new government. Klaus spoke with reporters after a two-hour meeting with President Vaclav Havel. Presidential aides said Havel instructed Klaus to begin the process of putting together a government.
NEWS
January 26, 1993
Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar's choice for the country's presidency, Roman Kovac, will probably get the job eventually, but it is likely to take at least two rounds of voting and some political wrestling by a divided and divisive Slovak Parliament for him to gain the necessary 60% majority over Communist and Christian Democratic opponents.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | MARK J. PORUBCANSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Only her well and a shed stand between Maria Hospodarova and the gray village church of St. Michael the Archangel, which used to be hers, but a 1,000-year chasm of distrust is unbridgeable. For the devout Orthodox Christian, walking to St. Michael next door has become pointless since the majority Catholics reclaimed it in 1990. "I cannot be a Greek Catholic," said Hospodarova, 58, a retired collective farm worker. "It is impossible for me."
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apprehension is growing among economists and Western diplomats that Yugoslavia's economic reform program, which has achieved at least limited success in beating back inflation and stabilizing the currency, may be running up against the brick wall of Yugoslav nationalism. The reform plan introduced by federal Prime Minister Ante Markovic, elected in 1989, has been praised by Yugoslavs for its success in curbing inflation, which exceeded 2,600% a year when he took over.
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