Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSlovakia Government Officials
IN THE NEWS

Slovakia Government Officials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Parliament elected Michal Kovac, a former banker, as Slovakia's first president, breaking a deadlock that had threatened to destabilize the newly independent country. Kovac, 62, was the last Speaker of Czechoslovakia's federal Parliament before the country split peacefully into Czech and Slovak states on Jan. 1. Parliament had failed in two tries last month to choose a head of state when none of four candidates won the necessary three-fifths majority.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slovak President Rudolf Schuster was flown to Austria late Wednesday for treatment after two major surgeries left him near death, with Slovak and Czech media fiercely criticizing alleged bungling of his medical care. "The president's state is serious but stabilized, enabling the transport. The president is in a better state than he was in the morning," presidential spokesman Jozef Leikert said late Wednesday, citing reports from Schuster's medical team.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | Reuters
Government candidate Rudolf Schuster was declared the victor Sunday in Slovakia's presidential election, paving the way for tough economic measures planned by the coalition administration. The central electoral commission said Schuster took more than 57% of the vote Saturday; ex-Premier Vladimir Meciar won 42.8%.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | From Reuters
Masked commandos stormed the home of former Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar early Thursday and arrested him on charges of fraud and abuse of power. Police units took up positions around Meciar's villa in the town of Turcianske Teplice, about 100 miles northeast of Bratislava, the capital, and stormed in after he ignored calls to come out. He later told a news conference: "I was up there in the apartment. After an explosion, I heard that something was going on. . . .
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slovak President Rudolf Schuster was flown to Austria late Wednesday for treatment after two major surgeries left him near death, with Slovak and Czech media fiercely criticizing alleged bungling of his medical care. "The president's state is serious but stabilized, enabling the transport. The president is in a better state than he was in the morning," presidential spokesman Jozef Leikert said late Wednesday, citing reports from Schuster's medical team.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Parliament of Slovakia voted Friday to oust populist Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar, who spearheaded the nationalist drive that brought about the 1993 break-up of Czechoslovakia and set the poorer eastern lands on a course for economic ruin. The 78-2 vote of no-confidence in Meciar, cast after a two-day debate in the Slovak capital of Bratislava, reflected the political and social turmoil that has gradually consumed Slovakia since its damaging split from the Czech lands 14 months ago.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | From Reuters
The Slovak government defied a constitutional court Tuesday and provoked charges that Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar was establishing totalitarian rule by saying it will cancel a planned referendum on the presidency. The move came hours after President Michal Kovac, one of Meciar's fiercest critics, stepped down at the end of his term with no successor in place. Meciar was left to take over most of Kovac's powers.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | From Reuters
Masked commandos stormed the home of former Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar early Thursday and arrested him on charges of fraud and abuse of power. Police units took up positions around Meciar's villa in the town of Turcianske Teplice, about 100 miles northeast of Bratislava, the capital, and stormed in after he ignored calls to come out. He later told a news conference: "I was up there in the apartment. After an explosion, I heard that something was going on. . . .
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | Reuters
A coalition of five Slovak parties chose former Foreign Minister Jozef Moravcik as prime minister Monday, replacing Vladimir Meciar. President Michal Kovac approved the nomination, a presidential spokesman said. The decision was made in talks among parliamentary leaders that began after Meciar was toppled in a vote of no confidence Friday. Moravcik broke away from Meciar's party to form his own faction in February.
NEWS
January 26, 1993
Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar's choice for the country's presidency, Roman Kovac, will probably get the job eventually, but it is likely to take at least two rounds of voting and some political wrestling by a divided and divisive Slovak Parliament for him to gain the necessary 60% majority over Communist and Christian Democratic opponents.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | Reuters
Government candidate Rudolf Schuster was declared the victor Sunday in Slovakia's presidential election, paving the way for tough economic measures planned by the coalition administration. The central electoral commission said Schuster took more than 57% of the vote Saturday; ex-Premier Vladimir Meciar won 42.8%.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | From Reuters
The Slovak government defied a constitutional court Tuesday and provoked charges that Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar was establishing totalitarian rule by saying it will cancel a planned referendum on the presidency. The move came hours after President Michal Kovac, one of Meciar's fiercest critics, stepped down at the end of his term with no successor in place. Meciar was left to take over most of Kovac's powers.
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | Reuters
A coalition of five Slovak parties chose former Foreign Minister Jozef Moravcik as prime minister Monday, replacing Vladimir Meciar. President Michal Kovac approved the nomination, a presidential spokesman said. The decision was made in talks among parliamentary leaders that began after Meciar was toppled in a vote of no confidence Friday. Moravcik broke away from Meciar's party to form his own faction in February.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Parliament of Slovakia voted Friday to oust populist Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar, who spearheaded the nationalist drive that brought about the 1993 break-up of Czechoslovakia and set the poorer eastern lands on a course for economic ruin. The 78-2 vote of no-confidence in Meciar, cast after a two-day debate in the Slovak capital of Bratislava, reflected the political and social turmoil that has gradually consumed Slovakia since its damaging split from the Czech lands 14 months ago.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Parliament elected Michal Kovac, a former banker, as Slovakia's first president, breaking a deadlock that had threatened to destabilize the newly independent country. Kovac, 62, was the last Speaker of Czechoslovakia's federal Parliament before the country split peacefully into Czech and Slovak states on Jan. 1. Parliament had failed in two tries last month to choose a head of state when none of four candidates won the necessary three-fifths majority.
NEWS
January 26, 1993
Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar's choice for the country's presidency, Roman Kovac, will probably get the job eventually, but it is likely to take at least two rounds of voting and some political wrestling by a divided and divisive Slovak Parliament for him to gain the necessary 60% majority over Communist and Christian Democratic opponents.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|