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NEWS
February 23, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadlock among Czechoslovak politicians over Slovak nationalist demands now seems likely to persist until after parliamentary elections in June, political figures here have concluded, and the controversy could cast a shadow over the country's economic reforms and the political future of President Vaclav Havel.
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WORLD
October 11, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Lawmakers in Slovakia on Tuesday rejected a proposal to beef up Europe's bailout fund for debt-stressed nations, but supporters are hopeful that the measure will pass in a second vote expected to take place within days. The ruling coalition of Prime Minister Iveta Radicova collapsed after failing to gather enough votes from the Slovak parliament in favor of the measure, an outcome she had warned would be tantamount to a vote of no confidence in her government. The plan for a strengthened bailout fund, which is widely seen as imperative for Europe to tame its growing debt crisis, was torpedoed in parliament by a junior party within Radicova's coalition.
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WORLD
November 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Undercover Czech officers arrested two Slovaks who tried to sell them nearly 7 pounds of radioactive material in a sting, officials said. The potential uses of the substance remained unclear pending an investigation, with experts differing on whether it could be used in a "dirty bomb." Police seized the suspects Friday in Brno, 135 miles southeast of Prague, police spokeswoman Blanka Kosinova said.
WORLD
October 7, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
For a man accused of holding an entire continent hostage, Richard Sulik cuts a modest figure. With his shiny pate and geeky glasses, he looks more like a mild-mannered economist than a rough-and-tumble politician. In fact, he's both. But it's as leader of the Freedom and Solidarity party in oft-overlooked Slovakia that Sulik finds himself in the unfamiliar glare of the international spotlight. He has the power, some say, to save Europe's economy or push it over the precipice, with serious consequences for the rest of the world.
NEWS
May 19, 2002 | ANDREA LORINCZOVA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the Radnicka cafe, tucked inside Bratislava's medieval City Hall, waiter Frantisek Toth might have to ask three or four times what kind of coffee you'd like. Anywhere else, a customer might get aggravated and leave. Here, almost nobody does--not after an encounter with the smiling Toth and his sincere apologies. Dealing with people like Toth, one of the cafe's five waiters with mental retardation or severe learning disabilities, is a new experience for most Slovaks. Until the fall of communism in 1989, disabled people were usually shut away in state institutions.
SPORTS
May 14, 2002 | Lonnie White
The Kings' Ziggy Palffy and his Slovak teammates might have had a forgettable experience at the Salt Lake City Olympic Games but they made the most of their time at last week's World Championships. On a late third-period goal by Washington's Peter Bondra, Slovakia won its first gold medal with a 4-3 victory over Russia in the championship game at Goteborg, Sweden, before a pro-Slovakia crowd that included President Rudolf Schuster.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | SAUL PETT, Associated Press SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
EDITOR'S NOTE What to make of that peril-prone punctuation, the hyphen? It both divides and unites. In the case of the Czecho-Slovak Republic, it did both at the same time. Now the French have chased it, like an unwanted ant, from pique-nique. Ignore the hyphen? Mais non! Take it seriously? Madness. A lingering look at the curious hyphen with a dash (which is different) of wit.
SPORTS
February 19, 1993 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
He lives in a land of ancient castles and age-old traditions, where the appetite for modern Western culture pervades everything but the past. Century old wineries, hand-painted pottery, the annual autumn goose feast . . . This is, in part, what makes Pezinok, Slovakia, special. But resident Jan Boris is interested in something else entirely. He calls it "World famous American high school basketball." His No. 1 favorite team? The Ocean View High Seahawks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1994
Your article "No-Confidence Vote Ousts Slovak Leader"(March 12) provides readers with a mixture of information and the author's assessment of a current economic situation in the Slovak Republic, which according to her, ousted the Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar. According to the article, inflation in the Slovak Republic gallops at triple-digit rates. Nevertheless, the recent data released by the Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic, based on CPI, indicates 26% inflation in 1993 as compared to 10% in 1992 and 61.2% in 1991.
SPORTS
December 7, 2001 | Jerry Crowe
The Kings have again made it clear that they will not release Ziggy Palffy or Lubomir Visnovsky to play for Slovakia in the preliminary round of the Salt Lake City Olympics in February. Slovakia is one of eight teams required to qualify for two spots in the main competition leading to the medal round.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
For a small Slovak town, Andy Warhol may be the key to rolling 15 minutes of fame into years of wealth. Medzilaborce, the birthplace of the American artist's emigrant parents in the Carpathian mountains near Ukraine, is investing $1.3 million to create "Warhol City," replete with Campbell Soup bus stops that complement a museum in his honor, a bronze statue in a square and a hotel called Pension Andy.
WORLD
April 18, 2004 | From Reuters
Slovaks dealt a knockout blow to authoritarian former Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar in Saturday's presidential election, choosing the more moderate Ivan Gasparovic just weeks before their nation is to join the European Union. The nation's electoral committee said today that according to preliminary results, Gasparovic, a former political ally of Meciar, took 59.91% of the vote with all 50 districts reporting.
WORLD
November 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Undercover Czech officers arrested two Slovaks who tried to sell them nearly 7 pounds of radioactive material in a sting, officials said. The potential uses of the substance remained unclear pending an investigation, with experts differing on whether it could be used in a "dirty bomb." Police seized the suspects Friday in Brno, 135 miles southeast of Prague, police spokeswoman Blanka Kosinova said.
WORLD
March 9, 2003 | From Reuters
Czech and Slovak troops trained to respond to chemical, biological and nuclear attacks began deploying in Kuwait on Saturday in preparation for any retaliatory strike in case of a U.S.-led war against Iraq. The joint Czech-Slovak battalion, with expertise built up during the Cold War, will patrol the streets of Kuwait City, military bases and installations including the oil fields, Czech Col. Dusan Lupuljev said.
NEWS
May 19, 2002 | ANDREA LORINCZOVA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the Radnicka cafe, tucked inside Bratislava's medieval City Hall, waiter Frantisek Toth might have to ask three or four times what kind of coffee you'd like. Anywhere else, a customer might get aggravated and leave. Here, almost nobody does--not after an encounter with the smiling Toth and his sincere apologies. Dealing with people like Toth, one of the cafe's five waiters with mental retardation or severe learning disabilities, is a new experience for most Slovaks. Until the fall of communism in 1989, disabled people were usually shut away in state institutions.
SPORTS
May 14, 2002 | Lonnie White
The Kings' Ziggy Palffy and his Slovak teammates might have had a forgettable experience at the Salt Lake City Olympic Games but they made the most of their time at last week's World Championships. On a late third-period goal by Washington's Peter Bondra, Slovakia won its first gold medal with a 4-3 victory over Russia in the championship game at Goteborg, Sweden, before a pro-Slovakia crowd that included President Rudolf Schuster.
WORLD
March 9, 2003 | From Reuters
Czech and Slovak troops trained to respond to chemical, biological and nuclear attacks began deploying in Kuwait on Saturday in preparation for any retaliatory strike in case of a U.S.-led war against Iraq. The joint Czech-Slovak battalion, with expertise built up during the Cold War, will patrol the streets of Kuwait City, military bases and installations including the oil fields, Czech Col. Dusan Lupuljev said.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of Slovaks gathered today outside the regional Parliament in Bratislava to protest the new name of the nation, the state news agency CTK reported. Some protesters called for a separate Slovak state, CTK said. The name "Czechoslovak Federative Republic" was adopted Thursday night after a daylong discussion in the federal Parliament and weeks of growing tensions between the Czechs and Slovaks.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Markiza Television made a big splash in December with a report that Slovak President Rudolf Schuster was briefly kidnapped last summer during a family vacation in Brazil by Indians demanding ransom. "We were held captive," Schuster told a reporter for the private Slovak network. "We did not know why and for what. While this was happening, the Indian who had invited us and the chief who had imprisoned us started up a quarrel, and I thought they would even begin to fight each other."
SPORTS
February 11, 2002 | J.A. ADANDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was some serious second-guessing after Slovakia's 6-6 tie with Latvia Sunday night at the E Center eliminated the Slovaks from men's hockey contention. There was second-guessing of a system that forces teams such as Slovakia to cut and paste lineups together in the midst of an active NHL regular-season schedule. There was second-guessing of Slovakian Jan Filc's decision to use Ziggy Palffy against Germany on Saturday.
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