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NEWS
June 30, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just north of this bucolic village in the wooded foothills of the lower Alps, Rudi Jugovar and fellow reservists have chopped down sturdy linden trees to block the road to the border with Austria. The newly deputized warriors have left their office jobs and made sure their families are safe at home. At the barricade of felled timber, they wait with their rifles, ready to repel a threatened onslaught by the Yugoslav People's Army.
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NEWS
August 18, 1991 | From Associated Press
Croatian units blew up a key bridge Saturday and federal forces pounded Croatian positions from the ground and air as fierce fighting shattered a cease-fire established Aug 7. The air strikes and deployment of troops to Okucani marked the military's most direct intervention in Croatia since the truce took effect. At least 21 people have died since the cease-fire was declared by the Yugoslav collective presidency.
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NEWS
June 29, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslav air force fighter planes bombed Slovenia's main airports and border crossings Friday, killing soldiers and civilians before the Belgrade government claimed it had pounded the rebellious republic into submission and would hold its fire. A European Community delegation announced early today in Zagreb that Slovenia and a second breakaway republic, Croatia, had agreed to temporarily suspend their independence declarations. There was no official confirmation from either republic.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Some federal troops began moving back from Slovenia's border areas Sunday, but they did not comply with the Yugoslav government's order to leave the secessionist republic. Meanwhile, ethnic fighting flared across Yugoslavia's other renegade republic, Croatia. At least 12 people were reported killed in the worst weekend of violence in the Yugoslav conflict.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its thunderous assault on tiny Slovenia, the Yugoslav People's Army has demonstrated a fierce resolve to defend the fractured federation that is the only justification for its existence. Only by flexing military muscle could the remaining believers in Yugoslavia keep alive even infinitesimal hopes of forcing unity among the rivalrous Balkan peoples.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Some federal troops began moving back from Slovenia's border areas Sunday, but they did not comply with the Yugoslav government's order to leave the secessionist republic. Meanwhile, ethnic fighting flared across Yugoslavia's other renegade republic, Croatia. At least 12 people were reported killed in the worst weekend of violence in the Yugoslav conflict.
NEWS
June 29, 1991
Croatia and Slovenia, Yugoslavia's breakaway republics, would be outmanned and outgunned in a war with the federal Yugoslav People's Army. Here are some facts about the federal army and the forces in Croatia and Slovenia: YUGOSLAV PEOPLE'S ARMY 180,000 troops, including 110,000 conscripts 2,000 tanks Nearly 400 fighter planes 150 helicopters, most armed with antitank missiles Troops come from all of Yugoslavia's myriad ethnic groups.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Slovenian leaders said the federal army's decision to withdraw from the Yugoslav republic amounts to recognition of its independence. Croatia, meanwhile, demanded that the military leave that republic as well. Ethnic violence in Croatia left at least two dead and seven injured, reports said. Federal Defense Minister Veljko Kadijevic warned in a surprise TV interview in Belgrade that the situation in the nation is "rapidly deteriorating."
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | From Reuters
Fresh-faced and homesick, captured Yugoslav soldiers in Slovenia say they thought they were going to defend their country against an Italian attack when they were ordered to seize border crossings. "Our officer said the Italians were attacking the frontier and that was why we were being sent to the border," Driton Fazli, a 22-year-old from Kosovo province, told reporters from a makeshift prison at a local school.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thick cordons of parked trucks that had barricaded Ljubljana for more than a week seemed to have lifted with the morning mist. The first stretch of this main road headed east from the Slovenian capital toward Croatia appeared, deceptively, to be clear of defensive blockades. Two Slovenian reservists manned the sole checkpoint at the highway entrance, slouching against their car, smoking with one hand and sporting AK-47 assault guns with the other.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Slovenian leaders said the federal army's decision to withdraw from the Yugoslav republic amounts to recognition of its independence. Croatia, meanwhile, demanded that the military leave that republic as well. Ethnic violence in Croatia left at least two dead and seven injured, reports said. Federal Defense Minister Veljko Kadijevic warned in a surprise TV interview in Belgrade that the situation in the nation is "rapidly deteriorating."
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav People's Army will immediately begin withdrawing its 20,000 troops from Slovenia, it was announced Thursday in a move that suggests federal acceptance of independence for the republic. The decision by the federal presidency meeting in Belgrade was announced by the Serbian delegate, Borisav Jovic, on Belgrade Television.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slovenia's Parliament voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to abide by a cease-fire while negotiating for independence with federal authorities over the next three months. While the republic's approval of the European-brokered truce removed one threat to a fragile peace now holding in Slovenia, the federal presidency and the Yugoslav People's Army have yet to endorse the accord worked out Sunday on the Adriatic island of Brioni.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thick cordons of parked trucks that had barricaded Ljubljana for more than a week seemed to have lifted with the morning mist. The first stretch of this main road headed east from the Slovenian capital toward Croatia appeared, deceptively, to be clear of defensive blockades. Two Slovenian reservists manned the sole checkpoint at the highway entrance, slouching against their car, smoking with one hand and sporting AK-47 assault guns with the other.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakaway republic of Slovenia released prisoners of war and withdrew defense forces from Yugoslav federal army garrisons on Friday, but its refusal to give up symbolic moves toward independence drew sharp criticism from the army and threats of another attack.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | From Reuters
Fresh-faced and homesick, captured Yugoslav soldiers in Slovenia say they thought they were going to defend their country against an Italian attack when they were ordered to seize border crossings. "Our officer said the Italians were attacking the frontier and that was why we were being sent to the border," Driton Fazli, a 22-year-old from Kosovo province, told reporters from a makeshift prison at a local school.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakaway republic of Slovenia released prisoners of war and withdrew defense forces from Yugoslav federal army garrisons on Friday, but its refusal to give up symbolic moves toward independence drew sharp criticism from the army and threats of another attack.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav presidency Thursday ordered Slovenia to demobilize its militia units, dismantle all roadblocks and hand over border controls to the federal government in an effort to firm up a shaky cease-fire. But a senior Slovenian official immediately rejected the demands as "unfeasible and impossible to implement," sharpening the conflict between the secessionist republic and the Yugoslav army and raising the prospect of renewed fighting.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav presidency Thursday ordered Slovenia to demobilize its militia units, dismantle all roadblocks and hand over border controls to the federal government in an effort to firm up a shaky cease-fire. But a senior Slovenian official immediately rejected the demands as "unfeasible and impossible to implement," sharpening the conflict between the secessionist republic and the Yugoslav army and raising the prospect of renewed fighting.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A carpet of broken glass covers the roads and sidewalks of Vrhnika, a fitting allegory for the shattered lives of its soldiers and civilians who once lived here together in harmony but will never do so again. Yugoslavia's crisis has pitted the army against the people, and garrison towns like Vrhnika have become the emotional and physical front-lines of the spiraling conflict. "We lived together in this town for 30 years.
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