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Slovenia Currency

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October 12, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Bostjan Prebevsek bundled millions of Yugoslav dinars for their trip to a monetary graveyard, his Slovenian customers were lining up earlier this week with fistfuls more to plunk down in the biggest gamble of their lives. Having waited out a three-month moratorium on independence set by the European Community, tiny Slovenia has introduced its own currency to break free of the doomed dinar.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Bostjan Prebevsek bundled millions of Yugoslav dinars for their trip to a monetary graveyard, his Slovenian customers were lining up earlier this week with fistfuls more to plunk down in the biggest gamble of their lives. Having waited out a three-month moratorium on independence set by the European Community, tiny Slovenia has introduced its own currency to break free of the doomed dinar.
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June 4, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Unless you're from Cleveland, I'm prepared to bet that you've been overlooking Slovenia. That's OK. I was once like you. Slovenia, which lies 100 miles east of Venice, Italy, and 150 miles south of Vienna, is about the size of New Jersey, full of forests and mountains and lakes and about 2 million people. The language is Slovenian (also known as Slovene), although most young people speak enough English to make a foreigner feel comfortable.
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