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Slovenia Defense

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NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thick cordons of parked trucks that had barricaded Ljubljana for more than a week seemed to have lifted with the morning mist. The first stretch of this main road headed east from the Slovenian capital toward Croatia appeared, deceptively, to be clear of defensive blockades. Two Slovenian reservists manned the sole checkpoint at the highway entrance, slouching against their car, smoking with one hand and sporting AK-47 assault guns with the other.
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NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thick cordons of parked trucks that had barricaded Ljubljana for more than a week seemed to have lifted with the morning mist. The first stretch of this main road headed east from the Slovenian capital toward Croatia appeared, deceptively, to be clear of defensive blockades. Two Slovenian reservists manned the sole checkpoint at the highway entrance, slouching against their car, smoking with one hand and sporting AK-47 assault guns with the other.
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SPORTS
June 18, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
In a World Cup so far lacking any real drama, it took the U.S. to provide it by the wagon-load on Friday. With only eight minutes left on a bitterly cold afternoon at Johannesburg's Ellis Park stadium, Michael Bradley, the coach's son, ripped a shot into the back of the net to earn the Americans a 2-2 tie with Slovenia. The goal climaxed one of the greatest comebacks in American soccer history and kept Coach Bob Bradley's team alive in the tournament. Second-half sub Maurice Edu appeared to put the U.S. ahead in the 86th minute, poking in a close-range shot after Jozy Altidore headed Landon Donovan's free kick to him. But the goal was disallowed by referee Koman Couilibaly of Mali, apparently for a foul before Edu got the ball.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months of fighting between Serbs and Croats have taken more than 500 lives, Slovenia's foreign minister said Monday in an appeal to Western governments to give up on the idea of a united Yugoslavia. After talks with Austrian officials, Foreign Minister Dimitrij Rupel said he was assured that Vienna intends to recognize Slovenia and Croatia as independent nations in the next few weeks.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's collective presidency, in a move that could prop up the troubled federation, resurrected itself early today and elected Croatia's Stipe Mesic as head of state. The action in the federal capital of Belgrade removed a major obstacle to working out a European-mediated peace in the disintegrating country.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslav army tanks and helicopters roared into breakaway Slovenia on Thursday, engaging defiant territorial forces in deadly clashes and sparking a potentially devastating civil war. At least eight dead and dozens of other casualties were reported as violence flared throughout the tiny alpine republic that, along with Croatia, declared its independence from Yugoslavia on Tuesday.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav federal army under the command of renegade generals deployed a massive invasion force Wednesday, sending 180 tanks and armored vehicles thundering into neighboring republics and threatening a clash with Slovenia that could inflict thousands of casualties. The army advance from Belgrade triggered a full-scale alert and defensive deployments in the republics of Croatia and Slovenia, which declared independence from Yugoslavia on June 25.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav army and Slovenia appeared headed for an all-out war Monday after trading charges of violating a cease-fire and threatening to take whatever measures necessary to defend their territory. The Serbian-dominated high command in Belgrade ordered a massive mobilization of 200,000 "appropriate" reservists. Residents of the federal capital said young men were being stopped by police for random conscription checks.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viewed from the hilltop Venetian fortress towering over the town, Knin would seem as blameless and bucolic as any of the tidy, tile-roofed communities tucked into the valleys of the Krka River, twisting through the coastal ridges of Croatia. It is, in short, peaceful here.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakaway republic of Slovenia released prisoners of war and withdrew defense forces from Yugoslav federal army garrisons on Friday, but its refusal to give up symbolic moves toward independence drew sharp criticism from the army and threats of another attack.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav army Saturday ordered the rebellious republic of Slovenia to cease its war of resistance to federal intervention or face "decisive military action" that would crush its proclaimed independence. The ultimatum issued in Belgrade appeared to confirm Slovenian fears that the army is acting outside government control in its effort to subjugate the secessionist republic. "We are at the beginning of civil war," Gen.
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