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Slovenia Diplomatic Recognition Europe

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NEWS
January 16, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two dozen European nations finally and formally recognized Croatia and Slovenia on Wednesday, a move that prompted jubilant celebrations in the breakaway republics and effectively dissolved the 73-year-old Yugoslav federation. The rejoicing was especially fervent here among the Croats.
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NEWS
January 16, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two dozen European nations finally and formally recognized Croatia and Slovenia on Wednesday, a move that prompted jubilant celebrations in the breakaway republics and effectively dissolved the 73-year-old Yugoslav federation. The rejoicing was especially fervent here among the Croats.
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NEWS
January 8, 1992 | DANICA KIRKA and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A fighter jet of the Yugoslav army blasted a European Community helicopter out of the sky over Croatia on Tuesday, killing all five cease-fire monitors on board and further jeopardizing foreign efforts to end Yugoslavia's civil war. The attack, for which the Serbian-led federal Defense Ministry in Belgrade expressed "deep regret," shattered the relative peace that had reigned in Croatia since a 15th truce took effect Friday.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | DANICA KIRKA and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A fighter jet of the Yugoslav army blasted a European Community helicopter out of the sky over Croatia on Tuesday, killing all five cease-fire monitors on board and further jeopardizing foreign efforts to end Yugoslavia's civil war. The attack, for which the Serbian-led federal Defense Ministry in Belgrade expressed "deep regret," shattered the relative peace that had reigned in Croatia since a 15th truce took effect Friday.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | from the Washington Post
Serbia expressed outrage Tuesday over the European Community's decision to recognize two secessionist Yugoslav republics as independent states and warned that the action will prolong hostilities between warring Serbs and Croats. Radovan Karadzic, a politician who is close to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, told reporters that "the dictate of the EC will definitely lead to the escalation of the bloody war instead of a peaceful, democratic solution."
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration remained conspicuously noncommittal toward Croatia on Tuesday in the face of the European Community's decision to recognize breakaway Yugoslav republics in January, a move that presents Washington with the difficult choice of standing by principle or giving way to reality. The State Department greeted the EC's declaration by welcoming the month of breathing space before the EC accepts Croatia and Slovenia as independent states.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | from the Washington Post
Serbia expressed outrage Tuesday over the European Community's decision to recognize two secessionist Yugoslav republics as independent states and warned that the action will prolong hostilities between warring Serbs and Croats. Radovan Karadzic, a politician who is close to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, told reporters that "the dictate of the EC will definitely lead to the escalation of the bloody war instead of a peaceful, democratic solution."
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration remained conspicuously noncommittal toward Croatia on Tuesday in the face of the European Community's decision to recognize breakaway Yugoslav republics in January, a move that presents Washington with the difficult choice of standing by principle or giving way to reality. The State Department greeted the EC's declaration by welcoming the month of breathing space before the EC accepts Croatia and Slovenia as independent states.
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