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Slovenia Economy

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BUSINESS
February 2, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS
ISSUE: Since breaking from Yugoslavia in 1991, the tiny nation of Slovenia--which was the Balkan federation's economic locomotive--has been battered by a dizzying succession of crises that caused its gross national product to shrink almost 20%. But industry leaders and financial analysts say the bad times have bottomed out. Slovenia has reoriented exports to Western markets, and most indicators for 1993 point to recovery after a two-year tailspin.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS
ISSUE: Since breaking from Yugoslavia in 1991, the tiny nation of Slovenia--which was the Balkan federation's economic locomotive--has been battered by a dizzying succession of crises that caused its gross national product to shrink almost 20%. But industry leaders and financial analysts say the bad times have bottomed out. Slovenia has reoriented exports to Western markets, and most indicators for 1993 point to recovery after a two-year tailspin.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Bostjan Prebevsek bundled millions of Yugoslav dinars for their trip to a monetary graveyard, his Slovenian customers were lining up earlier this week with fistfuls more to plunk down in the biggest gamble of their lives. Having waited out a three-month moratorium on independence set by the European Community, tiny Slovenia has introduced its own currency to break free of the doomed dinar.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Bostjan Prebevsek bundled millions of Yugoslav dinars for their trip to a monetary graveyard, his Slovenian customers were lining up earlier this week with fistfuls more to plunk down in the biggest gamble of their lives. Having waited out a three-month moratorium on independence set by the European Community, tiny Slovenia has introduced its own currency to break free of the doomed dinar.
NEWS
June 22, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the sodden skies of an unseasonably raw evening, President Clinton delivered a message of hope and support Monday to this sliver of a nation that broke away from Yugoslavia eight years ago, opted for democracy and hasn't looked back.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jozefina Mokos says she knew there would be trouble after Croatia and Slovenia declared independence from Yugoslavia a decade ago. But it didn't matter--she was still "the happiest person in the world." Even looking at all that has happened since the two republics launched the breakup of the Balkan federation on June 25, 1991, Mokos, a retired sales clerk living here in the Croatian capital, has few regrets. She's not alone.
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