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March 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flicker of candlelight in the recess of a pale yellow chapel illuminates an alabaster likeness of the Virgin Mary. The 18th-Century shrine is one of hundreds of architectural footprints left on Slovenia by half a millennium of Austrian rule. The red-tiled roofs and arched bell towers of the churches and monasteries that crown the surrounding foothills show the Italian hand that governed by turns with the Hapsburg Empire until World War II.
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NEWS
November 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
According to partial results, Prime Minister Janez Drnovsek's center-left Liberal Democratic Party won the most votes in the country's second general election since independence from the former Yugoslav federation. With 82% of the votes counted, the Liberal Democrats had 27.1%. Drnovsek, 46, has been credited with securing a stable democracy and prosperous economy during his four-year term. Right-wing parties increased their share of the vote: the rightist People's Party had 19.
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NEWS
December 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Slovenians voted overwhelmingly Sunday for their republic to secede from Yugoslavia. In Serbia, the renamed Communists appeared headed for defeat in runoff elections, the opposition said. According to unofficial results of Slovenia's plebiscite, 88% of the electorate voted for secession, 4% voted against and the remainder of the ballots were invalid. Thousands danced and cheered in the streets of the Slovenian capital of Ljubljana.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flicker of candlelight in the recess of a pale yellow chapel illuminates an alabaster likeness of the Virgin Mary. The 18th-Century shrine is one of hundreds of architectural footprints left on Slovenia by half a millennium of Austrian rule. The red-tiled roofs and arched bell towers of the churches and monasteries that crown the surrounding foothills show the Italian hand that governed by turns with the Hapsburg Empire until World War II.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communism's sweeping election victory in Serbia may have eased fears of a military coup, but it sets up what observers say is a worst-case-scenario for durable peace and Yugoslav unity. The only hope for avoiding a breakup of the federation was for Serbia to elect a democratic president or a Parliament willing to negotiate a more equitable relationship with Slovenia and Croatia. Yugoslavia's two most prosperous republics plan to secede unless they are granted economic and military autonomy.
NEWS
November 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
According to partial results, Prime Minister Janez Drnovsek's center-left Liberal Democratic Party won the most votes in the country's second general election since independence from the former Yugoslav federation. With 82% of the votes counted, the Liberal Democrats had 27.1%. Drnovsek, 46, has been credited with securing a stable democracy and prosperous economy during his four-year term. Right-wing parties increased their share of the vote: the rightist People's Party had 19.
NEWS
December 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Slovenians voted overwhelmingly Sunday for their republic to secede from Yugoslavia. In Serbia, the renamed Communists appeared headed for defeat in runoff elections, the opposition said. According to unofficial results of Slovenia's plebiscite, 88% of the electorate voted for secession, 4% voted against and the remainder of the ballots were invalid. Thousands danced and cheered in the streets of the Slovenian capital of Ljubljana.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communism's sweeping election victory in Serbia may have eased fears of a military coup, but it sets up what observers say is a worst-case-scenario for durable peace and Yugoslav unity. The only hope for avoiding a breakup of the federation was for Serbia to elect a democratic president or a Parliament willing to negotiate a more equitable relationship with Slovenia and Croatia. Yugoslavia's two most prosperous republics plan to secede unless they are granted economic and military autonomy.
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