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NEWS
February 22, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The republic of Croatia on Thursday joined Slovenia's move to secede from Yugoslavia, stepping up the pressure at crisis talks scheduled for today in Sarajevo that seek an alternative to a violent national breakup. The Croatian Parliament nullified all federal laws in the republic and declared that federal officials in Belgrade have no right to proclaim a state of emergency without Croatia's consent. In addition, lawmakers in Zagreb bestowed immunity from arrest on Croatian government ministers.
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NEWS
June 22, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the sodden skies of an unseasonably raw evening, President Clinton delivered a message of hope and support Monday to this sliver of a nation that broke away from Yugoslavia eight years ago, opted for democracy and hasn't looked back.
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NEWS
May 9, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The virtually powerless federal government appealed for peace among war-mongering radicals in Serbia and Croatia on Wednesday, but there were no signs that nationalist leaders would heed the call and halt Yugoslavia's slide into anarchy and civil war. After a third night of crisis talks, the eight-member state presidency remained deadlocked over whether to impose martial law. The Serbian-dominated federal army has deployed tanks and combat-ready troops to ethnically troubled areas.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as leaders of Yugoslavia and its constituent republics accepted a European Community peace plan Sunday, Serbs and Croats were pitted against each other in 10 hours of fierce fighting. News service reports from the Adriatic island of Brioni, where the talks took place, said that negotiators, including three EC foreign ministers acting as mediators, agreed that all parties will begin talks Aug. 1.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal army broke a troubling three-day silence Tuesday, easing fears of an imminent military coup by promising not to interfere in Yugoslavia's political crisis. But the armed forces warned that they will "under no circumstances permit inter-ethnic armed conflicts and civil war" and also signaled their readiness to halt unrest such as the anti-Communist protests that paralyzed Belgrade last week.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hurtling toward a Wednesday date with independence despite Western opposition, Slovenian leaders declared Monday "there is no way back" from secession and acknowledged that their action will mean the disintegration of Yugoslavia. Federal Prime Minister Ante Markovic made a last-minute appeal for unity, warning that civil war and economic ruin could be the costs of independence for Slovenia and Croatia.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flicker of candlelight in the recess of a pale yellow chapel illuminates an alabaster likeness of the Virgin Mary. The 18th-Century shrine is one of hundreds of architectural footprints left on Slovenia by half a millennium of Austrian rule. The red-tiled roofs and arched bell towers of the churches and monasteries that crown the surrounding foothills show the Italian hand that governed by turns with the Hapsburg Empire until World War II.
NEWS
June 22, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the sodden skies of an unseasonably raw evening, President Clinton delivered a message of hope and support Monday to this sliver of a nation that broke away from Yugoslavia eight years ago, opted for democracy and hasn't looked back.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fed up with fruitless efforts to prevent the breakup of Yugoslavia, Slovenia began the process of secession Wednesday by annulling all federal authority in the tiny republic. The Slovenian Assembly also overwhelmingly approved a four-point Act of Dissociation, which the pro-independence media declared to be the end of the 72-year-old state of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as leaders of Yugoslavia and its constituent republics accepted a European Community peace plan Sunday, Serbs and Croats were pitted against each other in 10 hours of fierce fighting. News service reports from the Adriatic island of Brioni, where the talks took place, said that negotiators, including three EC foreign ministers acting as mediators, agreed that all parties will begin talks Aug. 1.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hurtling toward a Wednesday date with independence despite Western opposition, Slovenian leaders declared Monday "there is no way back" from secession and acknowledged that their action will mean the disintegration of Yugoslavia. Federal Prime Minister Ante Markovic made a last-minute appeal for unity, warning that civil war and economic ruin could be the costs of independence for Slovenia and Croatia.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The virtually powerless federal government appealed for peace among war-mongering radicals in Serbia and Croatia on Wednesday, but there were no signs that nationalist leaders would heed the call and halt Yugoslavia's slide into anarchy and civil war. After a third night of crisis talks, the eight-member state presidency remained deadlocked over whether to impose martial law. The Serbian-dominated federal army has deployed tanks and combat-ready troops to ethnically troubled areas.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal army broke a troubling three-day silence Tuesday, easing fears of an imminent military coup by promising not to interfere in Yugoslavia's political crisis. But the armed forces warned that they will "under no circumstances permit inter-ethnic armed conflicts and civil war" and also signaled their readiness to halt unrest such as the anti-Communist protests that paralyzed Belgrade last week.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's largest republics moved onto a war footing Saturday, with Serbia and Croatia mobilizing police and reservists in the wake of a federal leadership crisis that has heightened the likelihood of a military coup. Serbia's hard-line Communist president, Slobodan Milosevic, declared that his republic will no longer recognize the authority of the federal presidency and said the disintegrating federation of Yugoslavia has "entered the final stage of its agony."
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flicker of candlelight in the recess of a pale yellow chapel illuminates an alabaster likeness of the Virgin Mary. The 18th-Century shrine is one of hundreds of architectural footprints left on Slovenia by half a millennium of Austrian rule. The red-tiled roofs and arched bell towers of the churches and monasteries that crown the surrounding foothills show the Italian hand that governed by turns with the Hapsburg Empire until World War II.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The republic of Croatia on Thursday joined Slovenia's move to secede from Yugoslavia, stepping up the pressure at crisis talks scheduled for today in Sarajevo that seek an alternative to a violent national breakup. The Croatian Parliament nullified all federal laws in the republic and declared that federal officials in Belgrade have no right to proclaim a state of emergency without Croatia's consent. In addition, lawmakers in Zagreb bestowed immunity from arrest on Croatian government ministers.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's largest republics moved onto a war footing Saturday, with Serbia and Croatia mobilizing police and reservists in the wake of a federal leadership crisis that has heightened the likelihood of a military coup. Serbia's hard-line Communist president, Slobodan Milosevic, declared that his republic will no longer recognize the authority of the federal presidency and said the disintegrating federation of Yugoslavia has "entered the final stage of its agony."
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fed up with fruitless efforts to prevent the breakup of Yugoslavia, Slovenia began the process of secession Wednesday by annulling all federal authority in the tiny republic. The Slovenian Assembly also overwhelmingly approved a four-point Act of Dissociation, which the pro-independence media declared to be the end of the 72-year-old state of Yugoslavia.
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