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Slovenia Military Assaults Yugoslavia

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NEWS
July 3, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration bluntly warned Yugoslavia's central government Tuesday that the United States opposes the use of military force, even to prevent the disintegration of the 73-year-old Balkan federation. Ambassador Dzevad Mujezinovic was summoned to the State Department to be told that although the U.S.
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NEWS
August 18, 1991 | From Associated Press
Croatian units blew up a key bridge Saturday and federal forces pounded Croatian positions from the ground and air as fierce fighting shattered a cease-fire established Aug 7. The air strikes and deployment of troops to Okucani marked the military's most direct intervention in Croatia since the truce took effect. At least 21 people have died since the cease-fire was declared by the Yugoslav collective presidency.
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NEWS
July 5, 1991 | From Reuters
Fresh-faced and homesick, captured Yugoslav soldiers in Slovenia say they thought they were going to defend their country against an Italian attack when they were ordered to seize border crossings. "Our officer said the Italians were attacking the frontier and that was why we were being sent to the border," Driton Fazli, a 22-year-old from Kosovo province, told reporters from a makeshift prison at a local school.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thick cordons of parked trucks that had barricaded Ljubljana for more than a week seemed to have lifted with the morning mist. The first stretch of this main road headed east from the Slovenian capital toward Croatia appeared, deceptively, to be clear of defensive blockades. Two Slovenian reservists manned the sole checkpoint at the highway entrance, slouching against their car, smoking with one hand and sporting AK-47 assault guns with the other.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European diplomats continued to search Thursday for a diplomatic solution to the Yugoslav crisis but without much success. In Prague, Czechoslovakia, delegates to an emergency meeting of the 35-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe agreed to send an "observer force" to Yugoslavia to try to reduce the threat of military action in the breakaway republics of Slovenia and Croatia.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thick cordons of parked trucks that had barricaded Ljubljana for more than a week seemed to have lifted with the morning mist. The first stretch of this main road headed east from the Slovenian capital toward Croatia appeared, deceptively, to be clear of defensive blockades. Two Slovenian reservists manned the sole checkpoint at the highway entrance, slouching against their car, smoking with one hand and sporting AK-47 assault guns with the other.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakaway republic of Slovenia released prisoners of war and withdrew defense forces from Yugoslav federal army garrisons on Friday, but its refusal to give up symbolic moves toward independence drew sharp criticism from the army and threats of another attack.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav presidency Thursday ordered Slovenia to demobilize its militia units, dismantle all roadblocks and hand over border controls to the federal government in an effort to firm up a shaky cease-fire. But a senior Slovenian official immediately rejected the demands as "unfeasible and impossible to implement," sharpening the conflict between the secessionist republic and the Yugoslav army and raising the prospect of renewed fighting.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | From Associated Press
Croatian units blew up a key bridge Saturday and federal forces pounded Croatian positions from the ground and air as fierce fighting shattered a cease-fire established Aug 7. The air strikes and deployment of troops to Okucani marked the military's most direct intervention in Croatia since the truce took effect. At least 21 people have died since the cease-fire was declared by the Yugoslav collective presidency.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav army and Slovenia appeared headed for an all-out war Monday after trading charges of violating a cease-fire and threatening to take whatever measures necessary to defend their territory. The Serbian-dominated high command in Belgrade ordered a massive mobilization of 200,000 "appropriate" reservists. Residents of the federal capital said young men were being stopped by police for random conscription checks.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakaway republic of Slovenia released prisoners of war and withdrew defense forces from Yugoslav federal army garrisons on Friday, but its refusal to give up symbolic moves toward independence drew sharp criticism from the army and threats of another attack.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | From Reuters
Fresh-faced and homesick, captured Yugoslav soldiers in Slovenia say they thought they were going to defend their country against an Italian attack when they were ordered to seize border crossings. "Our officer said the Italians were attacking the frontier and that was why we were being sent to the border," Driton Fazli, a 22-year-old from Kosovo province, told reporters from a makeshift prison at a local school.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European diplomats continued to search Thursday for a diplomatic solution to the Yugoslav crisis but without much success. In Prague, Czechoslovakia, delegates to an emergency meeting of the 35-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe agreed to send an "observer force" to Yugoslavia to try to reduce the threat of military action in the breakaway republics of Slovenia and Croatia.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav presidency Thursday ordered Slovenia to demobilize its militia units, dismantle all roadblocks and hand over border controls to the federal government in an effort to firm up a shaky cease-fire. But a senior Slovenian official immediately rejected the demands as "unfeasible and impossible to implement," sharpening the conflict between the secessionist republic and the Yugoslav army and raising the prospect of renewed fighting.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing signs that Yugoslavia's federal army is out of control and no longer taking orders from the central government, the United States and many of its European allies Wednesday were considering an embargo on arms sales to demonstrate international disgust with the army's use of force against breakaway Slovenia and Croatia. Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A carpet of broken glass covers the roads and sidewalks of Vrhnika, a fitting allegory for the shattered lives of its soldiers and civilians who once lived here together in harmony but will never do so again. Yugoslavia's crisis has pitted the army against the people, and garrison towns like Vrhnika have become the emotional and physical front-lines of the spiraling conflict. "We lived together in this town for 30 years.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing signs that Yugoslavia's federal army is out of control and no longer taking orders from the central government, the United States and many of its European allies Wednesday were considering an embargo on arms sales to demonstrate international disgust with the army's use of force against breakaway Slovenia and Croatia. Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav army's excessive use of force to deter Slovenian secession has stirred international sympathy for the rebellious republic and pushed Western governments a little closer to de facto recognition of its disputed sovereignty. U.S. and European leaders warned Slovenia before it seceded from Yugoslavia last Tuesday that it would face a diplomatic cold shoulder if it pulled out of the crisis-torn federation without an agreement with the other republics.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav federal army under the command of renegade generals deployed a massive invasion force Wednesday, sending 180 tanks and armored vehicles thundering into neighboring republics and threatening a clash with Slovenia that could inflict thousands of casualties. The army advance from Belgrade triggered a full-scale alert and defensive deployments in the republics of Croatia and Slovenia, which declared independence from Yugoslavia on June 25.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration bluntly warned Yugoslavia's central government Tuesday that the United States opposes the use of military force, even to prevent the disintegration of the 73-year-old Balkan federation. Ambassador Dzevad Mujezinovic was summoned to the State Department to be told that although the U.S.
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