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NEWS
September 27, 1989
The Yugoslav republic of Slovenia defied federal authorities and vowed to give itself the right to secede. Communist Party leaders in Slovenia, a small republic of 2 million, said they will adopt amendments to their republic's constitution declaring that it can split from Yugoslavia by referendum.
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NEWS
July 3, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav People's Army declared Tuesday that it is at war with Slovenia after deadly clashes erupted throughout the breakaway republic, inflicting casualties on surrounded and demoralized federal troops. Fierce fighting along Slovenia's border with Croatia cast the republic into a state of siege. Federal soldiers in armored columns exchanged fire with Slovenian territorial defense forces, with the army suffering at least 10 deaths and 13 injuries.
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NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leaders of a seven-party pro-independence coalition in the Yugoslav republic of Slovenia claimed victory in last Sunday's elections. It was Yugoslavia's first multi-party elections in more than half a century. With 85% of the vote counted, the Democratic United Opposition of Slovenia had 55% of the vote for the Parliament's decision-making chamber while the Communists collected just 17.5%. Such a victory would end 45 years of Communist rule in the tiny republic.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav army's excessive use of force to deter Slovenian secession has stirred international sympathy for the rebellious republic and pushed Western governments a little closer to de facto recognition of its disputed sovereignty. U.S. and European leaders warned Slovenia before it seceded from Yugoslavia last Tuesday that it would face a diplomatic cold shoulder if it pulled out of the crisis-torn federation without an agreement with the other republics.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Communist reformer won a runoff presidential election in Slovenia on Sunday, and a non-Communist center-right party led in parliamentary elections in the neighboring Yugoslav republic of Croatia. The elections enabled voters in the two republics to choose among Communist reformers and Western-oriented leaders and could further divide the Yugoslav federation.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav army's excessive use of force to deter Slovenian secession has stirred international sympathy for the rebellious republic and pushed Western governments a little closer to de facto recognition of its disputed sovereignty. U.S. and European leaders warned Slovenia before it seceded from Yugoslavia last Tuesday that it would face a diplomatic cold shoulder if it pulled out of the crisis-torn federation without an agreement with the other republics.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yugoslav People's Army declared Tuesday that it is at war with Slovenia after deadly clashes erupted throughout the breakaway republic, inflicting casualties on surrounded and demoralized federal troops. Fierce fighting along Slovenia's border with Croatia cast the republic into a state of siege. Federal soldiers in armored columns exchanged fire with Slovenian territorial defense forces, with the army suffering at least 10 deaths and 13 injuries.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | Associated Press
The Slovenian journalists' organization will abolish a bylaws provision calling on journalists to be loyal to the ideas of Marxism-Leninism, the official news agency Tanjug said Saturday. The bylaw had been adopted in 1982 at a meeting of the Yugoslav Journalists' Assn. The new move reflects growing calls for democratization in the country and particularly in Slovenia, Yugoslavia's industrially advanced northern republic, which borders Italy and Austria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1986
I wish to correct two errors in Laura C. Curran's letter (June 28), "Chernobyl Leaves Cloud of Fear Across Europe." First, the reactor at Krsko in Slovenia, Yugoslavia, is 50 and not 20 miles away from the Austrian border. This is the only nuclear power plant in Yugoslavia. Second, it is not "of the same design as Chernobyl." The reactor was manufactured and installed by Westinghouse Electric and has a containment vessel. G. BART STARE Newhall
NEWS
June 29, 1991
Croatia and Slovenia, Yugoslavia's breakaway republics, would be outmanned and outgunned in a war with the federal Yugoslav People's Army. Here are some facts about the federal army and the forces in Croatia and Slovenia: YUGOSLAV PEOPLE'S ARMY 180,000 troops, including 110,000 conscripts 2,000 tanks Nearly 400 fighter planes 150 helicopters, most armed with antitank missiles Troops come from all of Yugoslavia's myriad ethnic groups.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Communist reformer won a runoff presidential election in Slovenia on Sunday, and a non-Communist center-right party led in parliamentary elections in the neighboring Yugoslav republic of Croatia. The elections enabled voters in the two republics to choose among Communist reformers and Western-oriented leaders and could further divide the Yugoslav federation.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leaders of a seven-party pro-independence coalition in the Yugoslav republic of Slovenia claimed victory in last Sunday's elections. It was Yugoslavia's first multi-party elections in more than half a century. With 85% of the vote counted, the Democratic United Opposition of Slovenia had 55% of the vote for the Parliament's decision-making chamber while the Communists collected just 17.5%. Such a victory would end 45 years of Communist rule in the tiny republic.
NEWS
September 27, 1989
The Yugoslav republic of Slovenia defied federal authorities and vowed to give itself the right to secede. Communist Party leaders in Slovenia, a small republic of 2 million, said they will adopt amendments to their republic's constitution declaring that it can split from Yugoslavia by referendum.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bosnia-Herzegovina and Yugoslavia established diplomatic ties Friday, eight years after Bosnia seceded from the former Yugoslav federation in a bloody ethnic war. "We are leaving difficult years behind us," Yugoslav Foreign Minister Goran Svilanovic said after a signing ceremony with his Bosnian counterpart, Jadranko Prlic. "We have to turn to the future."
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