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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1988
A televised debate on Measure A, the Orange County slow-growth initiative, will be re-broadcast tonight at 6 on KOCE-TV, Channel 50 in Orange County. Moderated by KOCE's Jim Cooper, the debate brought together three prominent supporters of the initiative and three principal opponents. Sponsored by the Orange County Edition of The Times, the debate was first broadcast on May 23.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 28, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- What would happen to Yahoo if its golden goose stopped laying golden eggs? Investors were not just disappointed in Yahoo's fourth-quarter results Tuesday. They were also disappointed in the growth of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, in which Yahoo has a 24% stake. That stake has helped Yahoo's share price double in the last year -- even as its online advertising business has continued to decline -- because Alibaba is preparing for a blockbuster initial public offering this year.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Economic growth will remain slow over the next year but the risk of a recession is low, according to a survey of 48 economists. The unemployment rate, which surprisingly dropped sharply to 7.8% in September, won't fall any further until after the middle of next year, according to the survey by the Wall Street Journal. The rate will still be 7.8% in June 2013, and will drop to 7.6% in December 2013, it said. The economy will add an average of 147,000 jobs a month through 2013, just about enough to keep up with the growth of the labor force, according to the survey released Friday.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
You may have missed it, given the launch of the Christmas shopping season and all the foofaraw about the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, but earlier this month Barack Obama gave the most important speech of his presidency. The topic was the rising level of economic inequality in America, which Obama identified as " the defining challenge of our time. " Numerous trends have come together over the last few decades, he said, to create "an economy that's become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1988
Key events in the history of the county's slow-growth initiative: June 13, 1987: Members of Orange County Tomorrow, a citizens organization formed to deal with growth issues in the county, unveil the Citizens' Sensible Growth and Traffic Control Initiative. At the same time, a special committee, Citizens for Sensible Growth and Traffic Control, is formed to mount a petition drive to get the measure on the June, 1988, countywide ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1987
The two Dans (Garcia and Shapiro) articulated perfectly the concerns I have expressed over the possible economic ripple effects of the so-called "slow-growth" movement ("Heed the 'Have-Nots' on the Slow-Growth Issue," Op-Ed Page, Sept. 8). Two important factors buttress their very sound conclusions. The first is that "slow growth" is an attractive political label; it is as though anyone opposed to across-the-city planning measures is a "fast-growth" advocate in favor of traffic jams, smog, overcrowded schools and other of the undeniably negative results of growth.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1988
Written in response to Chapman College's analysis of the Orange County slow-growth initiative. The analysis projected that approval of slow-growth measures would have a negative impact on the county's economy. Michael Flagg's article in the April 14 Business section reported that the "County's Average Home Price Jumps 18% in Year as Sales, Supply Decrease." With this information, one may easily apply the "creative arithmetic logic" used in the Chapman College $10,000 Board of Supervisors' study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1987
Your Oct. 28 edition reported Supervisor Harriett Wieder's suggestion of a poll to ask voters "whether they would be willing to pay higher taxes and change their working hours to ease traffic congestion and improve air quality." Another bureaucratic absurdity! Slow-growth groups are filing initiatives in many Orange County cities. Instead of viewing this action by grass-roots organizations as a mandate to slow the rate of development, Supervisor Weider wants us to change our life styles, family life, and pay more money so that development can continue to flourish in our communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
Re: "Partial Closure of Highway 118 Drives Down Business," Feb. 5 County Planning commissioner Mike Wesner's remarks implying that resistance from "slow-growth advocates" was responsible indirectly for the 118 bridge collapse near Balcom Canyon is pure rubbish. I challenge Wesner to back up his accusation with facts and quotes or I think he owes me and a lot of Ventura County residents with similar views a public apology for his contemptuous remark. We "slow-growth advocates" will admit we want to slow and stop the headlong rush to make the 118 into an 84-foot-wide superhighway so as to prevent the demise of agriculture in Las Posas Valley.
NEWS
October 25, 1987
I recently read an article in the New York Times by Robert Reinhold regarding growth in Los Angeles, and this is my feeling on the subject: Coughing, squinting, burning eyes, pounding heart, throbbing head, cursing and swearing, anxiety attacks: These are becoming the daily symptoms of the population who wish to live and die (probably sooner than later) in L. A. The living conditions in L. A. are becoming horrendous. It is a major decision to drive anywhere unless taking provisions for a camp-out in the left-turn lane and carrying volumes of reading material for waiting at red lights or standing in a line that is apt to form anywhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
For all Santa Monica has changed over the last 30 years - the tech and entertainment offices, the upscale shopping centers - its skyline has remained largely the same: a few aging towers overlooking the city's coastal bluffs. But that skyline is now poised to be dramatically altered. One project would bring a 21-story hotel to Ocean Avenue, creating the tallest building in the city. Another hotel designed by famed hometown architect Frank Gehry would add a wavy white tower just steps from the sand.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
As the economy improves, commercial real estate industry leaders are increasingly optimistic about a surge in the California market over the next three years or so, a new report said. Experts said they expect the nonresidential market will keep growing steadily for the next three years but start to slow after 2016 or 2017. There will still be growth, the report said, but at a slower rate. The conclusions are based on a survey of selected California real estate professionals in the development and investment sectors of the industry.
OPINION
March 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
One figure in a new report neatly summarizes the potential pitfalls for Obamacare: 30.1%. That's how much premiums could rise next year, on average, for the roughly 1.3 million moderate- and upper-income Californians who buy individual health insurance policies. Most of that increase is attributable to the insurance reforms in the 2010 law, also known as the Affordable Care Act. The bill's title is not ironic - its provisions will slow the growth of healthcare costs and lead over time to a more rational and efficient system.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. job market looks like it took a big but not devastating blow last month from Hurricane Sandy. In a report ahead of Friday's government release of monthly employment statistics, the payroll processor Automatic Data Processing Inc. said the U.S. economy added 118,000 private-sector jobs in November. Although that's down from the 158,000 new private-sector jobs that ADP estimated for October, that growth didn't fall more sharply lends hope that the severe storms that wreaked havoc in the Northeast in late October didn't slam the employment market as hard as some people had feared.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Now that Wall Street knows President Obama will stay in the White House, investors' attention has returned to looming crises facing the U.S. and European economies. Major stock indexes were down more than 2% midway through the first trading session after election day. At the top of the agenda is the "fiscal cliff," the automatic spending cuts and tax hikes looming at year's end. If Obama cannot successfully resolve the crisis with a House still controlled by Republicans, economists have warned that the "cliff" could slow growth and push the U.S. back into recession.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Economic growth will remain slow over the next year but the risk of a recession is low, according to a survey of 48 economists. The unemployment rate, which surprisingly dropped sharply to 7.8% in September, won't fall any further until after the middle of next year, according to the survey by the Wall Street Journal. The rate will still be 7.8% in June 2013, and will drop to 7.6% in December 2013, it said. The economy will add an average of 147,000 jobs a month through 2013, just about enough to keep up with the growth of the labor force, according to the survey released Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1989
The recent decision on slow growth in San Juan Capistrano by Superior Court Judge William F. McDonald simply astounds me. Calling the measure unfair to developers, he ruled that they should not have to pay for improvements to meet already existing needs. Yet how fair is it for the people who live in San Juan Capistrano and the rest of Orange County to see their quality of life decline with the smog, traffic snarls, waste problems and potential water shortages that are the result of unbridled development?
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | Ricardo Lopez
California's tech boom is bolstering the economy and new jobs are being created every month, but the state's employment gains in the last year could be largely lost should conditions in China and Europe worsen substantially. The quarterly UCLA Anderson Forecast, released Thursday, said an imploding Eurozone crisis and a further slowing of the Chinese economy, though not likely, are "not out of the question. " "What happens in Europe and China is not insignificant for California," said Jerry Nickelsburg, senior economist at the forecast.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2012 | Don Lee
A weak second-quarter economic report made it clear that the country remains stuck in a painfully slow recovery for the foreseeable future. Analysts now say that the economy for the rest of this year will look much like it does today, with the November election taking place in an economic middle zone -- neither robust growth nor a plunge into recession. Fresh government data Friday confirmed that economic growth slowed in the second quarter as consumers, despite seeing relief from lower gasoline prices, pulled back on spending for cars and other big-ticket items.
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