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Slow Growth Movement

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BUSINESS
February 25, 1989 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
Last year Southern California's home-building industry seemed beset on every side with slow-growth initiatives pending in Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties. But the political support for those initiatives turned out to be soft, and with the help of some savvy consultants and millions of dollars in campaign contributions, the builders beat most of them. Two initiatives that did pass, in San Juan Capistrano and San Clemente, have been overturned in court.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2003 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
Kevin Sweeney rolled back into Ventura County the other day, with his 16-year-old stepdaughter riding shotgun in their gold Honda hybrid and two long surfboards cinched to the top. They stopped at an old hangout near the Faria Beach house that they rented the summer he taught her to surf. This time they were fulfilling a rite of spring by shopping for the right college for Hannah, who graduates from high school next year. See a campus, hit the surf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1987 | DAN GARCIA and DAN SHAPIRO, Dan Garcia is the president of the Los Angeles City Planning Commission. Dan Shapiro is a lawyer in Encino who successfully sued to impose a high-rise moratorium along Ventura Boulevard
Like no other Los Angeles political issue in the last 15 years, the slow-growth movement has captured the imagination of ordinary citizens and politicians alike. However, the movement's success--symbolized most recently by the overwhelming election victory of Ruth Galanter to the City Council--potentially contains within it the seeds of failure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2003 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Pink streaks color the morning sky as Steve Bennett pulls on his running shoes. Exercise, like many things in Bennett's disciplined life, is the common-sense thing to do. And if dawn is the only time to fit a run into his schedule, he will rise with the birds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1990
Supervisor Harriett Wieder is quoted as saying we have to "dust off" voluntary restrictions of water consumption enacted in 1988. She is also quoted as saying, "We are approaching a crisis." I submit that the supervisors are the problem. Did it every occur to the Wieders, Rileys, et al, that they, above all others, brought the present problem to its current proportions by giving developers practically a free hand to build out the southern part of Orange County. They were so anxious to please the developers and were scared to death that a slow-growth movement was about to get started that little, if any, thought was given to the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1988
Judge John Woolley has ruled to keep the slow-growth initiative on the ballot. Ironically, another "quality of life" hoax, the Seal Beach initiative, was defeated on the same day. In your March 30 story, slow-growth leader Belinda Blacketer responded with "that's wonderful" to the judge's decision. A recent Chapman College study cited anything but "wonderful" results should the countywide initiative pass June 7. According to the study, jobs will be lost, housing will be more scarce, prices higher, and the traffic congestion problem will worsen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1988
As the Southern California regional director of the Sierra Club, I am deeply disturbed by Boyarsky's analysis of Yaroslavsky's record on slow growth. It's perfectly clear, upon reading the article, that the evidence gathered by Boyarsky in support of his thesis does not in fact support it, and that Boyarsky was fishing for some sort of political angle that the facts simply do not bear out. The Sierra Club believes that Yaroslavsky, together with council members Marvin Braude and Ruth Gallanter, has the best environmental record on the City Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1986 | HEIDI EVANS, Times Staff Writer
From coast to coast suburbs are coming of age, taking on new roles--and new problems as they outgrow their bedroom community past. Today's suburbs are home to a large and cosmopolitan population, a complex economy, a variety of businesses and industry. Yet these very modern metroplexes are overseen by governments set up for the simpler suburbs of yesterday--a system that now is hopelessly outdated and naive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988
I think your article "Slow-Growth Initiative Foes Fire an Opening Volley" (May 3) has finally exposed the real players behind the slow-growth fight. As we all know, the war is being waged against developers who have every right to defend themselves. But what this article clarifies for us is that leaders of the slow-growth movement are not all they appear to be. While they continue to harp on the traffic congestion that development causes, they don't want a 10-lane highway that could actually relieve the congestion because the route goes right by their homes!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1988 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
In the Santa Monica Mountains, where the voter revolt against Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich and his generally pro-development policies began last winter, the disappointed organizers are regrouping and anxiously waiting to see what Antonovich does next. Elated by his lopsided victory over Baxter Ward, Antonovich pledged, even before all the votes were counted, not to change his policies on development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1999
Re "A Chance for More Progress," Ventura County editorial, Nov. 21. For a newspaper that is sometimes quite remarkable in the depth of its reporting, I couldn't believe the superficiality of this commentary on outgoing Thousand Oaks Mayor Linda Parks. Let's set the record straight. Linda Parks is not a leader of the slow-growth movement. She is one of the major players of a no-growth movement that has paralyzed our county with emotional terrorism. Never are the destructive actions of Parks and her no-growth faction brought to light--and it is those actions that are ruining our community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1990
Supervisor Harriett Wieder is quoted as saying we have to "dust off" voluntary restrictions of water consumption enacted in 1988. She is also quoted as saying, "We are approaching a crisis." I submit that the supervisors are the problem. Did it every occur to the Wieders, Rileys, et al, that they, above all others, brought the present problem to its current proportions by giving developers practically a free hand to build out the southern part of Orange County. They were so anxious to please the developers and were scared to death that a slow-growth movement was about to get started that little, if any, thought was given to the future.
REAL ESTATE
June 25, 1989 | DAVID M. MYERS, Times Staff Writer
The trade group that represents nearly 7,000 California home builders and others in the housing industry has launched a $5-million program aimed at curbing the slow-growth movement and defeating a possible ballot measure that would limit growth statewide. Realtors, lenders and others involved in the real estate industry are also expected to join the program, which was started with little fanfare a few months ago by the influential California Building Industry Assn. The builders hope to eventually assemble a broad-based coalition of business, civic and ethnic groups to encourage more growth and promote the positive aspects of home building.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
In a potentially crippling third strike against the constitutionality of local slow-growth measures, a Superior Court judge Wednesday overturned a Costa Mesa voter initiative that sought to stall new development until existing traffic problems are met. In staunch agreement with earlier rulings on San Clemente and San Juan Capistrano initiatives, Judge William F. Rylaarsdam ruled that the Costa Mesa measure placed an unfair burden on developers to...
BUSINESS
February 25, 1989 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
Last year Southern California's home-building industry seemed beset on every side with slow-growth initiatives pending in Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties. But the political support for those initiatives turned out to be soft, and with the help of some savvy consultants and millions of dollars in campaign contributions, the builders beat most of them. Two initiatives that did pass, in San Juan Capistrano and San Clemente, have been overturned in court.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1988 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
Ten years ago, when Orange County was in the midst of another frantic housing boom, people were most concerned that developers set aside land for parks and help build enough schools to prevent overcrowding. Now traffic is the most controversial byproduct of the county's phenomenal growth.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
In a potentially crippling third strike against the constitutionality of local slow-growth measures, a Superior Court judge Wednesday overturned a Costa Mesa voter initiative that sought to stall new development until existing traffic problems are met. In staunch agreement with earlier rulings on San Clemente and San Juan Capistrano initiatives, Judge William F. Rylaarsdam ruled that the Costa Mesa measure placed an unfair burden on developers to...
REAL ESTATE
June 25, 1989 | DAVID M. MYERS, Times Staff Writer
The trade group that represents nearly 7,000 California home builders and others in the housing industry has launched a $5-million program aimed at curbing the slow-growth movement and defeating a possible ballot measure that would limit growth statewide. Realtors, lenders and others involved in the real estate industry are also expected to join the program, which was started with little fanfare a few months ago by the influential California Building Industry Assn. The builders hope to eventually assemble a broad-based coalition of business, civic and ethnic groups to encourage more growth and promote the positive aspects of home building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1988 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
In the Santa Monica Mountains, where the voter revolt against Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich and his generally pro-development policies began last winter, the disappointed organizers are regrouping and anxiously waiting to see what Antonovich does next. Elated by his lopsided victory over Baxter Ward, Antonovich pledged, even before all the votes were counted, not to change his policies on development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
With San Diego voters leading the way, the California slow-growth movement is in disarray after the decisive defeats Tuesday of growth-control measures there and in Riverside County. The losses follow the crushing defeat of a slow-growth initiative in Orange County last June and raise questions about the future of a movement that, only a few months ago, seemed to be gaining momentum throughout the state.
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