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Sludge

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BUSINESS
May 15, 1989
I keep lying awake nights wondering: After Exxon cleans up the beaches, what do workers do with all those oily rags and plastic bags full of sludge? MARJ HART Encino
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NATIONAL
November 30, 2013 | Ralph Vartabedian
On a wind-swept plateau, underground steel tanks that hold the nation's most deadly radioactive waste are slowly rotting. The soil deep under the desert brush is being fouled with plutonium, cesium and other material so toxic that it could deliver a lethal dose of radiation to a nearby person in minutes. The aging tanks at the former Hanford nuclear weapons complex contain 56 million gallons of sludge, the byproduct of several decades of nuclear weapons production, and they represent one of the nation's most treacherous environmental threats.
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WORLD
October 8, 2010 | Times wire services
? The toxic red sludge that burst out of a Hungarian factory's reservoir reached the mighty Danube on Thursday after wreaking havoc on smaller rivers and creeks, and sending downstream nations rushing to test their waters. The European Union and environmental officials fear an environmental catastrophe affecting half a dozen nations if the red sludge, a waste product of making aluminum, contaminates the Danube, Europe's second-longest river. Officials from Croatia, Serbia and Romania were taking river samples every few hours Thursday but hoping that the Danube's huge water volume would blunt the impact of the spill.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
EVANS, Colo. - The panicked escapes that took place in this riverside town last week were worth it: The trailer parks that frame the shoreline of the swollen South Platte now sit smashed and throttled by mud. And not just any mud. When the flood claimed the nearby wastewater treatment plant too, officials and residents worried that the deluged edges of Evans had turned into a toxic open sewer. "In our living room, there's 6 to 8 inches of pure, black mud," said Karen Kesterson, 68. "You just kind of slide around in it. " Colorado's epic rains brought more than just broken timber and broken homes.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Travelers, how many of you would invest in socks that promise to make your feet more comfortable and less sweaty -- made with coffee sludge? Get in line. A Kickstarter campaign to manufacture Atlas socks made of coffee-infused fabric has created a lot of buzz and raised more than four times the amount of seed money needed to make the socks a reality. Founders were hoping to raise $30,000 with the crowd-sourced campaign; as of Friday, they had raised more than $147,000 and will continue until July 24. "This is a great way to actually be smarter about your buying and finding out what customers want," Kit Hickey says.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Workers next month will begin a $1.2-million cleanup of radioactive sludge from a UC Davis research program that killed more than 1,000 beagles. A special task force has checked for hot spots in abandoned research buildings adjacent to the landfill where 35,000 gallons of sludge were buried. Officials hope to avoid having a part of the 6,000-acre campus labeled as one of the nation's dangerous toxic sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Concerned about Riverside County becoming a regional dumping ground, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday moved toward regulating the use of highly treated sewage sludge. If approved, an ordinance would control only the spreading of sludge on farm fields and scarred mining lands. Use of the material on golf courses, in landscaping and in backyard gardens would not be regulated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1994 | FRANK MANNING
A state-of-the-art sludge-processing facility that has been touted as the answer to the area's solid-waste recycling needs officially opened Wednesday, ending a 10-year effort to make the project a reality. Throughout the morning, Las Virgenes Municipal Water District officials led visiting dignitaries on tours of the district's $50-million facility, which turns sludge into fertilizer that is safe to use on gardens.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Residents in the Kingston area are reporting breathing problems and stress after more than 1 billion gallons of coal ash sludge spilled from a power plant storage facility. Last month, the state health department interviewed 368 residents within a 1.5-mile radius of the Kingston Fossil Plant. The plant is run by the Tennessee Valley Authority, the nation's largest public utility company. Ash surged into a neighborhood and a river when a containment wall broke there in December. A third of survey respondents said they perceived worsening upper respiratory symptoms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994
The California Highway Patrol closed off the eastbound lanes on the Riverside Freeway on Sunday night between Brookhurst Road and Magnolia Avenue and diverted traffic to southbound Interstate 5 after a truck spilled 79,000 pounds of sludge. The lanes were closed off at about 10 p.m. Sunday. The spill came about an hour after the CHP had to close off the southbound lanes on Interstate 5 at Camino de Estrella in San Clemente after a pedestrian was struck and killed.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Fish began dying en masse in the waters around Honolulu after hundreds of thousands of gallons of molasses spilled into Honolulu Harbor early this week, and there's nothing officials can do to clean it up. Thousands of fish have died from the sugary sludge. Crabs lay dead along the harbor bottom while more fish floated listlessly, some seeming to gasp above the surface of the water contaminated by the syrupy sweetener. The spill is one of the worst man-made disasters to hit Hawaii in recent memory, officials said, not least because no one has quite seen anything like it. "There's nothing you can do to clean up molasses," said Jeff Hull, a spokesman for Matson Inc., the company responsible for the leak.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Travelers, how many of you would invest in socks that promise to make your feet more comfortable and less sweaty -- made with coffee sludge? Get in line. A Kickstarter campaign to manufacture Atlas socks made of coffee-infused fabric has created a lot of buzz and raised more than four times the amount of seed money needed to make the socks a reality. Founders were hoping to raise $30,000 with the crowd-sourced campaign; as of Friday, they had raised more than $147,000 and will continue until July 24. "This is a great way to actually be smarter about your buying and finding out what customers want," Kit Hickey says.
WORLD
October 8, 2010 | Times wire services
? The toxic red sludge that burst out of a Hungarian factory's reservoir reached the mighty Danube on Thursday after wreaking havoc on smaller rivers and creeks, and sending downstream nations rushing to test their waters. The European Union and environmental officials fear an environmental catastrophe affecting half a dozen nations if the red sludge, a waste product of making aluminum, contaminates the Danube, Europe's second-longest river. Officials from Croatia, Serbia and Romania were taking river samples every few hours Thursday but hoping that the Danube's huge water volume would blunt the impact of the spill.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2010 | By Richard Simon and Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
BP moved ahead with a pumping operation to plug its infamous Gulf of Mexico well, while Senate leaders Tuesday shelved offshore drilling legislation that would lift the liability cap on oil spills. Heavy mud began pouring into BP's damaged well Tuesday afternoon after an initial test yielded the results engineers were looking for. It "was textbook," BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells said of the pumping test. "It went exactly as we would have expected." By filling the well's pipe system with dense drilling mud, BP is hoping to block all of the upward paths oil could take from its reservoir miles beneath the sea bed. The procedure may take hours or days.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2010 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
Gerry Matherne recently built a helicopter from "a bit of this and a piece of that," which made him a minor star on YouTube when the engine died in midair and he didn't. He somehow landed the crippled craft beside power lines. "I'm always inventing something," said the gruff 61-year-old captain of an oil supertanker. "When I was a boy, a wristwatch was never safe in my hands. I'd dismantle anything to see how it ran." So when Matherne learned of the runaway BP oil leak, he considered it a personal challenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Supreme Court's refusal to review Los Angeles' claim that a voter-approved ban on dumping sewage sludge in Kern County violates federal interstate commerce laws has plunged the city into a period of municipal distress over the best way to handle its processed human waste. The petition aimed to quash a Kern County law known as Measure E, which was approved in 2006 to block shipments from Southern California of more than 450,000 tons a year of treated wastes known as bio-solids to Green Acres, a farm the city bought in 1999 at a cost of about $15 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles' hopes of exporting concentrated sewage to Guatemala--aswirl in confusion one day ago--appeared to go down the tubes Friday as the Guatemalan ambassador insisted that any such deal is off. Additionally, city officials here put on hold their recommendation to approve the contract. In fact, questions were raised as to why the sludge deal was considered at all. A few months ago, officials in the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Here's my Toyota sob story. Back in 2002, a number of Toyota and Lexus models developed a condition in which their oil congealed into sludge and ruined the engine. My Sienna minivan seemed to be one of them. Toyota was, shall we say, less than proactive. The company at first denied there was any sludge problem. Then it blamed the problem on the owners' failure to get the oil changed on schedule, as though owners of $30,000 Toyotas and Lexuses, among all U.S. motorists, were uniquely slipshod about their regular engine maintenance.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2009 | Associated Press
Hundreds of gulls were killed or maimed in Cleveland after what investigators believe was cooking oil spewed from a sewer pipe into the Cuyahoga River. Investigators said Friday that several hundred gallons of the substance killed or disabled hundreds of gulls near the Kingsbury Run tributary. Most of the birds are just downstream from the site where environmentalists last week celebrated the Cuyahoga River's comeback since floating oil and debris caught fire on June 22, 1969.
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