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SCIENCE
February 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
The band King Missile's 1992 single "Detachable Penis" might seem like a tripped-out nightmare straight from the male psyche, but it's all too real for one strange sea creature. The sea slug Chromodoris reticulata has a disposable penis that it sheds after sexual intercourse, according to a new study in the journal Biology Letters. Researchers in Japan collected the red-and-white sea slug in shallow coral reefs off the coast of Okinawa. They stuck pairs of sea slugs in a small tank and watched the critters mate, documenting what they rather aptly called “bizarre mating behavior.”  C. reticulata is a hermaphrodite: Each animal possesses both male and female reproductive organs, and can use both at the same time.
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SCIENCE
August 26, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Fertilizer runoff has led to a global decline in seagrass meadows, which provide crucial habitat for fish. But thanks to sea otters, these meadows are flourishing in Elkhorn Slough, a major estuary in Monterey Bay, scientists say. Fertilizer from farms in Salinas flows into Elkhorn Slough, carrying phosphates and other nutrients that fuel the growth of algae on seagrass leaves. As the algae blooms, it shades the seagrass from the sunlight it needs to grow. In fact, nutrient levels are so high in Elkhorn Slough that scientists wouldn't expect seagrasses to survive there.
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SCIENCE
January 16, 2010 | By Amina Khan
Part animal, part plant! This may sound like a tabloid headline, but scientists say that a green sea slug has managed to incorporate enough algae parts to easily live off of sunlight, just as a plant does. Scientists already knew that a few slugs could eat algae but save the algae's chloroplasts from digestion and feed off of their energy. Chloroplasts are where the photosynthesis process of turning light into energy occurs. But this was not a self-sustaining system, since most slugs cannot make their own chlorophyll, a green pigment that fuels the chloroplasts.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
NEW YORK -- When the Angels selected first baseman C.J. Cron in the first round of the 2011 draft, they had a decided lack of power in the organization. Mark Trumbo was a rookie. Mike Trout had yet to make his major-league debut. Albert Pujols still played for the St. Louis Cardinals, Josh Hamilton for the Texas Rangers. Cron, 23, has emerged as one of the top slugging prospects in the minor leagues. He batted cleanup for the U.S. team in Sunday's Futures game. But he plays first base and designated hitter, the positions shared by Pujols and Trumbo.
SCIENCE
July 1, 2002 | FromTimes staff and wire reports
Caffeine, a common stimulant, can kill slugs and snails and can discourage slugs from munching on treated plants, suggesting a possible approach to environmentally friendly pest control for gardens and cropland, Hawaiian researchers reported in the June 27 issue of Nature. A team at the U.S. Department of Agriculture research center in Hilo found, for example, that when they let slugs bury themselves in potted soil and then applied a 2% caffeine solution to the dirt, 92% died within two days.
HOME & GARDEN
June 29, 2006
I'D like to offer an environmental suggestion regarding the slugs and snails problem ["A Deep Seeded Lupine Mystery," June 8]. My uncle told me to buy some beer and pour it into a bowl. Place the bowl(s) next to the suffering plant(s) in the early evening. You might need to dig a small indentation in the ground to lower the bowl closer to ground level. During the night the snails and slugs will be drawn into the bowl instead of the plants and will not be able to climb out. I have tried this and it really works (replace the beer daily)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1986 | John M. Wilson
Lorimar-Telepictures reportedly got $50 million upfront for syndication rights to "Dallas"--but Advertising Age, working from Nielsen statistics, says the series is struggling in its 93 markets. Among the revelations: "Dallas" loses in its top 10 markets (and wins only twice in its top 50). "America" (before it was canceled) beat "Dallas" in Phoenix and Albany; "Jeopardy" whipped it in Denver and Memphis; in L.A., "Wheel of Fortune" slugs it.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Newman Hood sits in a quaint, ornate courtroom, rocking slowly in his wooden chair, as lawyers and witnesses chart his descent from the golden existence and happy family life he once knew to the prospect of financial ruin and a life behind bars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mob-style rub-out of Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel 50 years ago today at the Beverly Hills mansion of his street-wise, auburn-haired mistress has endured as one of Los Angeles' most romanticized murder mysteries.
SPORTS
July 10, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
CHICAGO - The Chicago Cubs were grateful the temperature cooled to 74 degrees and the wind was blowing in at Wrigley Field on Wednesday night. Otherwise, the Angels might have hit a dozen home runs. One night after high heat and humidity and a stiff breeze blowing out sent balls flying out of the ballpark, conditions hardly seemed conducive to a game of power ball. That did nothing to deter the Angels, who hit five home runs, two by surging outfielder Josh Hamilton and one by Albert Pujols, in a 13-2 victory over the Cubs in which they bunched all of their home runs and 11 of 15 hits in a five-run first inning and a six-run fifth.
SPORTS
April 6, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
ARLINGTON, Texas -  Albert Pujols, given a start at designated hitter to ease the stress on his sore left foot, led a 12-hit attack with his 45th multi-home run game, ripping a two-run shot to center field in the first inning and a solo shot to left in the sixth to lead the Angels to an 8-4 victory over the Texas Rangers. Pujols' 476th and 477th home runs moved him past Stan Musial and Willie Stargell and into 28th place all-time. Mark Trumbo capped a four-run first inning with a two-run home run to right field, his first this season, and Peter Bourjos led off the sixth with a home run to left-center field, his first this year.
SCIENCE
March 19, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Move over, banana slug. Make way for Felimare californiensis , a sea slug sporting the California gold and Yale blue of the University of California. The Chromodoris nudibranch first named for the University of California in 1901 had vanished for decades from its native habitat in Southern California, until one was spotted off Catalina Island in 2003. Now, steady sightings have led marine biologists to believe it is making a comeback, for reasons yet to be determined.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman, Los Angeles Times
Forget the Gordie Howe hat trick of last season. In many ways, what forward Kyle Clifford did against the San Jose Sharks in Saturday's 5-2 win by the Kings was more impressive than his homage to Howe nearly 14 months ago against Ottawa. Then? Goal, assist and fight, a clear Howe hat trick. Now? Two goals, an exhausting scrap against behemoth defenseman Douglas Murray and a superb defensive play against Joe Pavleski at Staples Center. That play to help shut down Pavelski came shortly before Clifford's second goal of the game to make it 4-1 at 13 minutes 45 seconds of the second period.
SCIENCE
February 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
The band King Missile's 1992 single "Detachable Penis" might seem like a tripped-out nightmare straight from the male psyche, but it's all too real for one strange sea creature. The sea slug Chromodoris reticulata has a disposable penis that it sheds after sexual intercourse, according to a new study in the journal Biology Letters. Researchers in Japan collected the red-and-white sea slug in shallow coral reefs off the coast of Okinawa. They stuck pairs of sea slugs in a small tank and watched the critters mate, documenting what they rather aptly called “bizarre mating behavior.”  C. reticulata is a hermaphrodite: Each animal possesses both male and female reproductive organs, and can use both at the same time.
SPORTS
December 15, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
The irony was not lost on Josh Hamilton, the slugger whose career seems to have come full circle from the day Tampa Bay made him the first overall pick of the 1999 draft. "I started off with the Devil Rays," Hamilton said Saturday in a packed news conference at the ESPN Zone in Anaheim, "and now I'm an Angel. " So much has happened in between, from Hamilton's well-chronicled addiction to drugs and alcohol, to his three-year ban from baseball, to his 2007 ascent to the major leagues with Cincinnati and his rise to stardom with the Texas Rangers.
NEWS
December 30, 2003
Re the Field Guide (Dec. 23) on the banana slug: You forgot to mention that it is the mascot for UC Santa Cruz. That's one mascot the Indians haven't taken a shot at. Leslie C. Brand Pasadena
NEWS
December 23, 2003 | David Lukas
(LA)[ ARIOLIMAX COLUMBIANUS ] Lurking in the damp coastal forests of central and northern California is a creature that packs more teeth than a shark, smells with its body and leaves a slime trail wherever it travels. Giants of the slug world, banana slugs are native mollusks without the external shells of their snail cousins (though they do have a tiny internal one).
NEWS
October 15, 2012
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SPORTS
September 15, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Matt Kemp hit more home runs, drove in more runs and stole more bases than Ryan Braun did last year. Braun's Brewers advanced to the playoffs; Kemp's Dodgers did not. And Braun won the National League most-valuable-player award. "I think the main reason I won the award last year was because we had a better team than the Dodgers had," said Braun, who grew up a Dodgers fan in Granada Hills. "I honestly thought Matt had a better season than I did. " Braun is in the MVP race again, but his Brewers will not repeat as NL Central champions.
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