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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1999
Mark Adams' commentary states that he was on the Blue Ribbon Committee on Slum Housing (Sept. 15). This committee transferred the very inspectors that would have responded to Florina Sanchez's complaints of unsafe housing. These inspectors are now inspecting housing with few or no problems, harassing tenants and landlords alike, when they should be inspecting and citing the slumlords who have real-life safety issues. Affordable housing is a very large problem in this city. To solve it, we all have to work together--tenants, landlords, government and the financial community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1999
Mark Adams' commentary states that he was on the Blue Ribbon Committee on Slum Housing (Sept. 15). This committee transferred the very inspectors that would have responded to Florina Sanchez's complaints of unsafe housing. These inspectors are now inspecting housing with few or no problems, harassing tenants and landlords alike, when they should be inspecting and citing the slumlords who have real-life safety issues. Affordable housing is a very large problem in this city. To solve it, we all have to work together--tenants, landlords, government and the financial community.
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OPINION
July 27, 1997
Re "Housing Laws No Cure for Slums' Ills," July 20: The low-income housing industry in Los Angeles is in a very "sick" state. You are correct to point out the widespread problems of habitability with a substantial number of low-income housing units but stricter enforcement is not understanding the root problems of why these conditions persist. First, let me say that the city has done a poor job in understanding the landlords' plight in this whole mess and looks to ever increasing enforcement as the answer.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1999
$1,140 to rent the typical apartment in Los Angeles County? Maybe in West Los Angeles or Beverly Hills ["Rising Rents Squeeze Area's Working Poor," Sept. 10]. I am the president of a property management company in Los Angeles, and I can assure you that there are many nice apartment buildings in the city of Los Angeles, including the San Fernando Valley, where one can rent a one-bedroom apartment for $550-$650 and a two-bedroom for $750-$850. Just because someone can't afford to pay $1,140 in rent doesn't mean that they need to settle for slum housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
Amid concern that the city is failing to carry out the promise of inspecting all apartments for a $1-per-month fee, the Council ordered a review of the program Wednesday as a first step to an overhaul. Councilman Mike Feuer said the fee was adopted six months ago to pay for a new program that would inspect each of the city's 750,000 apartment units at least once every three years, rather than the past practice of waiting for complaints before sending inspectors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1990
I love it! The Giant Dipper is almost ready to roll and the developer says they "probably wouldn't have done it if the shopping hadn't been there" because "it was a real blighted area." Nobody mentioned good old Mike Gotch, long the subject of nasty remarks, attacked as if the development was the worst thing since slum housing. The center may not be the perfect solution, but given the economic situation of the time, Gotch really believed the development was a good compromise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997
The Los Angeles City Council, by an impressive 11 to 1, has voted to require routine housing inspections of every building with two or more apartments and to hire 80 more inspectors as part of a special enforcement unit to get the job done. This reform of a long-neglected city responsibility should reduce an epidemic of slum housing and preserve rental stock by finding problems earlier and forcing landlords to make repairs.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1999
$1,140 to rent the typical apartment in Los Angeles County? Maybe in West Los Angeles or Beverly Hills ["Rising Rents Squeeze Area's Working Poor," Sept. 10]. I am the president of a property management company in Los Angeles, and I can assure you that there are many nice apartment buildings in the city of Los Angeles, including the San Fernando Valley, where one can rent a one-bedroom apartment for $550-$650 and a two-bedroom for $750-$850. Just because someone can't afford to pay $1,140 in rent doesn't mean that they need to settle for slum housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1999 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One woman carried a plastic bag of asbestos she swept from the basement of her apartment building. Another carried an enlarged picture of four dead mice lying in traps. Others wore stickers that read, "No Broken Promises" and "No More Slums." The tenants marched into Wednesday's meeting of the Los Angeles City Council's ad hoc committee on substandard housing to make sure city leaders started making good on last year's promise to inspect and clean up slum housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Convictions in two slum housing cases became a boon to a homeless shelter for runaway youngsters Monday when City Atty. James Hahn delivered checks worth $7,500 to the Van Nuys-based Children of the Night facility. The two checks, one for $6,500 and another for $1,000, came from building owners who pleaded no contest to code violations. The shelter's executive director, Lois Lee, believes the punishment was fitting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1999 | MARK ADAMS, Mark Adams, a senior vice president of a property management firm, was a member of the Los Angeles Citizens' Blue Ribbon Committee on Slum Housing
By any definition, the Grandview Arms apartment building at 1200 S. Hoover St. is a slum. But Florina Sanchez doesn't have a lot of options. She is poor. She is trying to raise her children in the dank, dilapidated, disgusting conditions at the Grandview Arms. The plumbing leaks so often and so badly that the carpeting (tattered as it is) never dries out. Earlier this year, Sanchez's baby, Kimberly, had a respiratory infection that simply wouldn't clear. Then, one night, Kimberly died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1999 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to reverse an embarrassing oversight in the new slum housing reform law, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved an emergency allocation for a corps of building inspectors to enforce the law. The 12-0 vote allows the Housing Department to hire 22 inspectors and support staff to answer about 65 complaints a day about bad rental units. "I think it's a step in the right direction," said Larry Gross, executive director of the Center for Economic Survival in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1999 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One woman carried a plastic bag of asbestos she swept from the basement of her apartment building. Another carried an enlarged picture of four dead mice lying in traps. Others wore stickers that read, "No Broken Promises" and "No More Slums." The tenants marched into Wednesday's meeting of the Los Angeles City Council's ad hoc committee on substandard housing to make sure city leaders started making good on last year's promise to inspect and clean up slum housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
Amid concern that the city is failing to carry out the promise of inspecting all apartments for a $1-per-month fee, the Council ordered a review of the program Wednesday as a first step to an overhaul. Councilman Mike Feuer said the fee was adopted six months ago to pay for a new program that would inspect each of the city's 750,000 apartment units at least once every three years, rather than the past practice of waiting for complaints before sending inspectors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1998 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting casually on a desk in the nondescript offices of the city's Housing Department, Mayor Richard Riordan on Tuesday signed into law the most important anti-slum reform in Los Angeles history: the creation of a unit intended to ferret out blighted apartments across the city. "Every human being in the city has the right to live in quality housing," Riordan told a group of 14 inspectors who will form the core of the new city program. "And you're in the front lines of doing that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998
The Los Angeles City Council swiftly approved several key elements of the city's anti-slum housing code enforcement program Tuesday. "I think this is very exciting and quite historic," said City Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg. "It's to bring up from the bottom the quality of life for the rent-paying public." In November, the council approved a sweeping anti-slum plan but subsequent actions have been necessary to implement the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan called Monday for tripling the size of a small inspection unit that ferrets out slum conditions and moving the unit to another department widely regarded as more sympathetic to tenants. "Slum housing can no longer be tolerated in the City of the Angels," Riordan said as he stood before a downtown tenement cited for dozens of violations and profiled last week in The Times. "The change begins today."
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | BERND DEBUSMANN, Reuters
Latin America's biggest cities, already gasping for air and water, are turning into urban monsters whose size is being swollen by one of the biggest mass migrations in history. In the last 15 years, the population of the region's 20 largest cities has grown by more than 40 million to 85 million, making Latin America the world's most urbanized area. Seven of 10 Latin Americans now live in cities, according to U.N. figures. In contrast, Europe is about 50% urban, and Asia and Africa are 30% urban.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned about substandard housing in their suburb, city leaders Tuesday approved two measures aimed at eliminating squalid conditions. On unanimous votes, the City Council ordered its attorneys to write a long-awaited slumlord ordinance in the next month and agreed to begin active code enforcement in troubled neighborhoods. "I think we should send a very clear message tonight," Councilman Andy Fox said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997
The Los Angeles City Council, by an impressive 11 to 1, has voted to require routine housing inspections of every building with two or more apartments and to hire 80 more inspectors as part of a special enforcement unit to get the job done. This reform of a long-neglected city responsibility should reduce an epidemic of slum housing and preserve rental stock by finding problems earlier and forcing landlords to make repairs.
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