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Slums Mexico

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NEWS
December 31, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, this city named for an ancient renegade-poet-king earned its reputation as Latin America's largest slum--an urban sprawl of squatters' shanties and rural migrants who cobbled together a kaleidoscope of crushing poverty on Mexico City's outskirts. When the great quake of 1985 shattered Mexico City, it leveled Neza, as the town is widely known.
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NEWS
December 31, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, this city named for an ancient renegade-poet-king earned its reputation as Latin America's largest slum--an urban sprawl of squatters' shanties and rural migrants who cobbled together a kaleidoscope of crushing poverty on Mexico City's outskirts. When the great quake of 1985 shattered Mexico City, it leveled Neza, as the town is widely known.
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OPINION
February 5, 2013
Re "Who should pay?," Letters, Feb. 2 Many people say illegal immigrants should just go back home and stand in line like anyone else. That sounds reasonable only if you know nothing about how immigration visas are actually granted. In Mexico, demand exceeds the supply of slots available to people who want to emigrate to the U.S. Immediate family members of U.S. citizens (not just legal immigrants) typically must wait more than 10 years. For unskilled workers, it is almost impossible to legally emigrate to the U.S. from Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1989 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Year's end is traditionally a time of renewal and new beginnings. It is a time of reminiscing and predicting, of New Year's resolutions, promises and hopefulness. But there are many in society whose voices are seldom heard. They, like everyone else, have hopes and dreams for the new year and new decade. What follows is a sampling of those thoughts, taken from among more than 4,000 people who gathered at the Orange County Rescue Mission for a Christmas Day meal Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
One of the most enduring farces in American foreign policy was underway in China earlier this week: a U.S. secretary of state, in this case Madeleine Albright, engaging in "tough talk" about human rights. Just how tough the talk really was can be gauged by the fact that Albright also publicly reaffirmed U.S. policy of not linking trade and human rights. To underline the point, she is encouraging China to join the World Trade Organization, the U.S.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | ARTHUR H. ROTSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Hatch says he hit upon his Third World "poverty vaccination" while panic-stricken on a flight to Bolivia. He had decided he could not comply with requirements of a consulting job he had accepted from the Agency for International Development, and he was scrambling to come up with a suitable substitute. "And on my second double bourbon at 35,000 feet up flying over the Andes, I have to say it was like this thought just rolled through my body," Hatch said.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1991 | DAVID M. GORDON, DAVID M. GORDON is professor of economics at the New School for Social Research in New York.
Consider this urban scene: In New York, down the block from our house in a gentrifying neighborhood, a five-story walk-up is being renovated. A crew of immigrant workers is wielding shovel and hose to mix batches of cement by hand on the sidewalk in front of the building. No cement truck delivering ready-to-pour concrete. No portable, rotating mixer for mixed-to-order batches. Instead, the laborers use techniques of the early 19th Century.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004 | Enrique Krauze, Special to The Times
A few years ago, as I was watching the premiere of "Amores Perros," I thought that Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu truly had penetrated the depths of the "dogged life" in this anthropological experiment that is Mexico City. That is why he was able to convey the mysterious duality (the mixture of violence and coexistence) that characterizes the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pan African Film Festival, which will present some 70 programs through Feb. 16 at the Magic Johnson Theaters, opens tonight at 7:30 with Senegalese filmmaker Moussa Sense Absa's "Tableau Ferraille" (Scrap Heap). The film is a strong, socially conscious drama about the rise and fall of a naive young politician (Ismael Lo) with two very different wives, the devoted but barren Gagnesiri (Ndeye Fatou Ndaw) and the bored, glamorous Kine (Ndeye Beneta Diop).
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The truck showed the scars of the latest land quarrel, and the sight was enough to convince the villagers that they did not want more trouble. The windows of the red vehicle were smashed, and all of its tires were slashed. Gashes in the body were clearly the work of a machete. The vandalism had followed a wave of incidents: broken windows in the common meeting hall; attempts to burn down thatch-roofed huts; fights and threats in the corn fields; one bruised farmer in the hospital.
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