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OPINION
December 1, 2004
Re "Supervisors Can Play Santa All Year," Nov. 28: This one has me almost speechless! How can it be that we are allowing the L.A. County supervisors to have, in effect, a $1-million petty cash box apiece to use each year with no accountability? The argument that because "we spend billions" a million-dollar slush fund with absolutely no oversight is acceptable is insane. Every billion-dollar company has petty cash boxes with maybe $200 or $300 in them that are audited on a regular basis.
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BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our homeowner association's president explained to our board how the budget process actually works. She said: "You start by working out how much you can get out of the homeowners, then you go to the Budget and Reserve Study to figure out how to get that result. The reserve study company will work with us by doing a couple of go-arounds to get us to the result we want. " Am I being naive to think the job of a reserve study company is to come up with realistic numbers, instead of numbers that fit the board's agenda?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1985
What television program has the intellect of a PBS documentary, the gritty drama of "Hill Street Blues" and the humor of the old "Saturday Night Live"? We'll see, won't we? Bravo to Allan Parachini ("The Resurrection of Gene Scott," July 21). Dr. Gene Scott got my attention, and I'm a Phi Beta Kappa from UC Berkeley. Enough slush and drivel! Let's see Doc during prime time. VICKI BYLIN SCHEIBEL Canoga Park
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
A makeshift bucket brigade hauled 14 pails of mud and slush from the tent that Um Mahmoud shares with a dozen other Syrian refugees in a ramshackle settlement here in the Bekaa Valley, now blanketed with snow that lends an alpine sheen to the rugged stretch that extends to the Syrian border. While holiday-makers from Beirut hastened to the hills with sleds and toboggans, piling souvenir snow onto their vehicles for the drive home, there was nothing merry about the weekend blizzard for the multitudes of Syrians living rough in makeshift camps scattered throughout the region.
NEWS
May 8, 1989
A Greyhound bus overturned and slid down an embankment in a spring snowstorm near Sandusky, Ohio, injuring 16 people, and in Cincinnati snow fell in May for the first time in nearly a century. In Rochester, N.Y., 10.1 inches of snow fell, breaking that city's snowfall record for May by more than 6 1/2 inches. Snow also fell in parts of Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The unusual spring storm dumped up to two inches of icy slush on Ohio 2 in the area of the bus accident, which left three people hospitalized.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1987
Three cheers and much applause for Solomon and his insightful and accurate comments on the state of today's animation. As an amateur animator, it is disheartening to look at much of today's animated fare. In 1940, Walt Disney's "Fantasia" was a grand experiment in animation, a way to explore the medium in new and exciting ways. In his own words, it's "what we should have been doing at the time." Now, in 1987, it seems we're going back into animated unimaginative slush, using it quite often as a tool for marketing prospects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990
Your editorial "Another Election Rerun" (Oct. 26) highlights the central problem in American politics today. Any candidate, incumbent or otherwise, who is able to outspend his or her opponent is virtually always elected. Recognizing this fact, why not do away with elections altogether and simply award an office to the candidate who raises the most money? Since elections would be abolished, there would no longer be anything to spend those war chests on. Once the top money-raiser has been determined all of the candidates will be required to give back all they've collected, thus eliminating the corrupting influence of money in politics as well as ending the accumulation of all those carry-over slush funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1990
After reviewing the statements in support of Measure A on the Ventura County ballot, people ought to stand back and ask basic questions about priorities. If there is going to be an increase in the sales tax, historically the most inequitable of taxes, what should it be used for? Shouldn't it be for our most critical needs, those with the greatest potential for economic and social return? Isn't the first need improvement of educational facilities? In all fairness, shouldn't this include the improvement of educational opportunities for people of all ages and backgrounds?
NATIONAL
June 18, 2010 | Richard Simon and Scott Kraft
In a dramatic confrontation with angry members of Congress, a subdued and contrite BP chief Tony Hayward said Thursday that he was "deeply sorry" for the 59-day-old oil spill that continues to despoil the gulf and pledged that "we will make this right." But in a long day of tough bipartisan questioning, Hayward did little to quell the ire of lawmakers, and he infuriated several by declining to respond to a congressional committee's findings that BP took shortcuts to save time and money on a well that was behind schedule.
FOOD
July 5, 1985 | BETSY BALSLEY, Times Food Editor
Something cold . . . really cold . . . to drink remains a prime prerequisite for beating the hot weather blahs on a typical summer day. No matter that experts say you're probably better off to drink unchilled or even hot beverages if you're trying to cool off. And no matter that opening and closing the refrigerator door a thousand and one times a day keeps it operating at a maximum (and more expensive) high.
TRAVEL
February 4, 2011 | By Jason S. Mandell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The odd coupling of tradition and trendiness that characterizes Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood is perhaps nowhere more evident than at Full Circle Bar, a watering hole on a quiet block that dead-ends at an expressway. Here, young urbanites, who welcome the competition (and the shelter from the snow), are carrying on a century-old New York pastime whose extinction, until recently, seemed inevitable. The pastime? Skee-ball, a contest played at breezy boardwalk arcades by generations of New Yorkers.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2010 | Richard Simon and Scott Kraft
In a dramatic confrontation with angry members of Congress, a subdued and contrite BP chief Tony Hayward said Thursday that he was "deeply sorry" for the 59-day-old oil spill that continues to despoil the gulf and pledged that "we will make this right." But in a long day of tough bipartisan questioning, Hayward did little to quell the ire of lawmakers, and he infuriated several by declining to respond to a congressional committee's findings that BP took shortcuts to save time and money on a well that was behind schedule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2009 | Patrick McGreevy
The state's ethics watchdog agency enacted new rules Thursday to prohibit politicians, including Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, from using certain political accounts as "slush funds" to promote themselves. Funds raised by politicians for ballot-measure campaigns must be spent on specific propositions, the Fair Political Practices Commission ruled. There are no limits on how much money can be raised for such accounts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Three trombones as the front-line instruments in a jazz sextet might seem to be a pair too many for some listeners. But there they were Wednesday night at the Jazz Bakery -- the veteran trombonists Slide Hampton and Steve Turre, with young up-and-comer Andrae Murchison -- brashly romping through a steaming collection of hard-swinging jazz numbers. Following in, and expanding on, the pioneering pathway established in the '50s and '60s by the trombone team of J.J.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Hyundai Motor Co. Chairman Chung Mong-koo was convicted today of embezzlement and other charges and sentenced to three years in prison in a slush fund scandal that has weighed on South Korea's largest automaker. Prosecutors, who have been taking a hard line on corruption in South Korea, last month sought a six-year jail term, calling Chung's crimes "grave."
BUSINESS
August 13, 2006 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
The stock option backdating scandal hadn't been reading like great fodder for Hollywood. Then the government laid out its case against former Comverse Technology Inc. executives. The court papers released last week are rich with material -- imaginary employees, a slush fund named for "The Phantom of the Opera" and a botched coverup. Now we're getting the kinds of details that can overcome the eye-glazing effect that the term "option backdating" induces.
OPINION
March 19, 2006
Re "Panel Paid Wesson's Son $30,000," March 10 That the Committee for a Better California had only two donors who contributed a total of $45,000; and the committee paid Los Angeles City Councilman Herb Wesson's son $30,000 and another political campaign committee paid $10,000 to another son; and the fact that Michael Henry, director of personnel for Los Angeles County, is listed as the top committee official but Henry knows nothing about the payment...
SPORTS
December 20, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Salt Lake City Olympic scandal might stem from a foreign exchange program established by the U.S. Olympic Committee in the 1980s, the Salt Lake Tribune reported Sunday. The programs bought sports equipment and helped train athletes in developing nations. USOC officials, the newspaper said, took financial liberties with the program by wiring funds to foreign accounts, shopping with international guests on per-diem expenses, reimbursing travel costs with cash and keeping sloppy records.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The head of Hyundai Motor Co. returned to South Korea today amid an investigation of allegations that the country's dominant automaker created slush funds to bribe government officials. Hyundai Chairman Chung Mong Koo arrived at the main international airport serving Seoul in this port city west of the capital just before dawn on a flight from Los Angeles. He was greeted by dozens of Hyundai employees who escorted him to a waiting vehicle.
OPINION
March 19, 2006
Re "Panel Paid Wesson's Son $30,000," March 10 That the Committee for a Better California had only two donors who contributed a total of $45,000; and the committee paid Los Angeles City Councilman Herb Wesson's son $30,000 and another political campaign committee paid $10,000 to another son; and the fact that Michael Henry, director of personnel for Los Angeles County, is listed as the top committee official but Henry knows nothing about the payment...
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