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OPINION
July 7, 2003 | Rachel Stohl
In July 2001, a United Nations conference, now mostly forgotten, was convened to address the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons. The conferees worked hard and concluded their meeting with a detailed program of action to combat weapons proliferation. But two months later, the attacks of Sept. 11 focused the world's attention elsewhere, and the global war on terror utterly eclipsed the seemingly smaller and less-pressing issue of small arms. That was unfortunate.
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NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - As the Senate prepares to take up an aid package for Ukraine this week, congressional Republicans on Sunday called for stronger sanctions against Moscow amid heightened concerns about a Russian troop movements. “It's deeply concerning to see the Russian troop buildup along the border,” White House deputy national security advisor Tony Blinken told CNN's “State of the Union.”' “It creates the potential for incidents, for instability," he continued. “It's likely that what they're trying to do is intimidate the Ukrainians.
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NEWS
August 11, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY and CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thousands of would-be speculators clamoring for a chance to buy stocks in the southern city of Shenzhen abandoned unruly lines and rampaged through the city Monday to protest alleged corruption in stock sales. Police fired small arms and used tear gas in an attempt to control the crowds, which had lined up since the weekend at 302 banks and brokerage houses to buy stock-purchase applications.
WORLD
June 13, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The White House declared Thursday that Syria had crossed a "red line" by using chemical weapons in that country's civil war, and in response, U.S. officials said, President Obama had authorized sending arms to some rebel groups. The arms will be provided to the rebel Supreme Military Council, an official said. The council is the military arm of an umbrella group that represents more moderate factions of the forces arrayed against the government of President Bashar Assad.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
The first U.N. conference to curb the $1 billion-a-year illegal trafficking in small arms ended Saturday with 189 nations agreeing on a watered-down plan Washington wanted--with calls to limit weapon sales and restrict civilian gun ownership expunged. But the resolution left many Africans, Europeans and human rights groups angry, protesting that it will neither block governments from arming rebels nor control gun ownership anywhere.
OPINION
July 19, 2004 | Rachel Stohl, Rachel Stohl is senior analyst at the Center for Defense Information in Washington, D.C.
When the United States turned over sovereignty to the new government of Iraq last month, it did so without confronting one of the most pressing problems facing the country: the millions of small arms and light weapons plaguing Iraq's security and threatening its stability. Excluding small arms from the long-term security plan is a deadly mistake.
WORLD
June 13, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The White House declared Thursday that Syria had crossed a "red line" by using chemical weapons in that country's civil war, and in response, U.S. officials said, President Obama had authorized sending arms to some rebel groups. The arms will be provided to the rebel Supreme Military Council, an official said. The council is the military arm of an umbrella group that represents more moderate factions of the forces arrayed against the government of President Bashar Assad.
WORLD
October 1, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A bomb in a parked car targeted a restaurant in a mostly Shiite Muslim neighborhood of Baghdad, killing three people and injuring at least six, Iraqi police said. The U.S. military said a U.S. soldier was killed by small-arms fire in north Baghdad. At least 4,176 members of the U.S. military have died since the Iraq war began in March 2003, according to the independent website icasualties.org. The attacks occurred as the country's Sunni Arabs marked the start of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which ends the fasting month of Ramadan.
OPINION
January 26, 2007
Re "Guns' crooked paths to Compton's streets," Jan. 23 According to L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca and his department's officials, there should be laws to adequately control the sale and ownership of guns. No reasonable person could argue with that, yet the gun lobby and its political stooges have succeeded not only in preventing the creation of any serious system of licensing and registering small arms but in attaining the destruction of the very sort of databases that the Sheriff's Department used to track the firearms discussed in this article.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - The nutty notion that a citizen can be heavily enough armed to fight off the government went up in smoke near Big Bear Lake. This may sound crazy to most normal people, but there are some obsessed gun owners - although a minority, surely - who believe they need to arm themselves to perhaps combat government oppression. One reader wrote recently that he supported gun control "as long as I'm armed as well as the police," whom he didn't trust and felt he needed to be prepared to battle in a shootout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2012 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
A self-described "meat and potatoes" conservative, Tony Ruiz often argued politics with his son. They clashed over perceptions of Islam after the U.S. Embassy in Benghazi was overrun. But Tony said his son, Clinton, made some good points. "He drew a very clear distinction between Muslim radicals and the Islam religion," Tony said. "It actually did convince me. " He is still convinced, a month after his son, Sgt. Clinton K. Ruiz , was killed by small-arms fire in Afghanistan, serving a tour as a psychological operations specialist with the 9th Military Information Support Battalion, 8th Military Information Support Group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
In 2003, Daniel Quintana was a military police officer stationed at Morón Air Base in Spain. His job involved typical policing duties: foot patrol, traffic stops and domestic disputes. When he was off duty, he would play racquetball with fellow officers. He also loved to explore Spanish cities and towns. But that year, as the U.S. led the invasion of Iraq, Quintana decided he wanted to be a soldier. He wanted to fight on the front lines. "It shocked me," said Jean-Claude Brooks, a retired flight chief who served alongside Quintana in Spain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
As students at UC Irvine, Ricardo Cerros Jr. and his buddy Mike Clark often made plans to train together for the university's taekwondo team. When they did, Clark would sometimes show up early at the gym, hoping for a head start. But there would be Cerros, already an hour or more into the workout. Often, Clark would find Cerros on the treadmill in several layers of clothing, including a sauna suit, to make his workout more challenging. "He would train harder than everyone," Clark said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The words were a farewell from a son and a soldier: I want to make myself perfectly clear about why I gave my life for this. On his fourth deployment to Afghanistan over three years, Tyler Holtz wrote his family a letter. The 22-year-old sergeant in the Army's elite Ranger regiment gave it to a fellow Ranger and asked him to send it home if anything happened to him. Don't make the mistake of thinking I joined the Army out of some misguided, short lived sense of patriotism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
After growing up in a rough part of Bellflower, Arturo E. Rodriguez enlisted in the Army soon after high school. Later, deployed to Afghanistan, Rodriguez sometimes drew joking parallels between the conflict he witnessed there and in his hometown. During a firefight last year, he joked with a close friend, an Army buddy from a similar neighborhood in Los Angeles, saying they'd gone "from one war zone to another," the friend said later. Although he was just 19, the baby-faced soldier carried himself like a man several years older, those close to him said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1999
Michael F. Blake's article about John Ford's stage production of "What Price Glory?" in 1949 brought back fond memories to me ("He Was Their Stage Coach," May 28). Bob Lehman and I designed the complicated sound effects for this World War I comedy-drama and traveled with the company to produce the necessary sounds of artillery, machine gun, small arms, grenades, motors and thunder--all on acetate records and 16-inch turntables offstage. Audio tape was a future development. As the cast and crew boarded the special train in Pasadena, all of us--stars and "go-fers" alike--were given a check for $100, which was to cover incidentals (mainly meals)
NEWS
December 19, 1986 | United Press International
The United States has sent the government of Chad an emergency shipment of arms and ammunition, and President Reagan has authorized an additional $15 million in weapons to help the African nation fight off Libyan attacks, the State Department said Thursday. The urgently required arms will be taken from Department of Defense stocks and will include vehicles, transport aircraft, small arms, ammunition and medical supplies, State Department officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2011 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Army Spc. Kevin J. Hilaman was a kind and charismatic man for whom family and country meant everything, those close to him said. Hilaman joined the Army in 2003 as an infantryman, the Pentagon said. His first two deployments were to Iraq, after which he returned for a short while to civilian life. But when he couldn't find a nonmilitary job that he was equally passionate about, he reenlisted, relatives said. In April, he deployed to Afghanistan. And that's where he was killed June 26 in eastern Kunar province, on the Pakistani border.
WORLD
July 14, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In one of the deadliest 24-hour spans in recent weeks for American forces, eight U.S. soldiers were killed in three separate attacks in southern Afghanistan late Tuesday and Wednesday, including a coordinated assault on an Afghan elite police headquarters in the southern city of Kandahar. In the first attack, an insurgent rammed his explosives-filled car into the main gate of the Afghan police compound late Tuesday night while other militants opened fire with automatic rifles and rocket launchers, NATO and Afghan authorities said.
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