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BUSINESS
January 28, 1998 | VICKI TORRES
Now that Congress and the Legislature are back in session, small-business lobbyists are assessing the political landscape to see what gains can be made in 1998. At the federal level, an estimated $2.4-billion budget surplus could mean tax cuts for small business, lobbyists say. Such breaks are likely to be discussed in hearings held in March by Rep. Bill Archer (R-Texas), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.
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BUSINESS
January 28, 1998 | VICKI TORRES
Now that Congress and the Legislature are back in session, small-business lobbyists are assessing the political landscape to see what gains can be made in 1998. At the federal level, an estimated $2.4-billion budget surplus could mean tax cuts for small business, lobbyists say. Such breaks are likely to be discussed in hearings held in March by Rep. Bill Archer (R-Texas), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 1997 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's small-business owners are the most optimistic they have been in two years, according to a survey released Tuesday by a national small-business association. "Overall, the news is quite good," said Jim Weidman, a spokesman for the National Federation of Independent Businesses, the largest small-business group in the nation. "California small businesses are going to continue along with good, steady growth and hiring and wage increases."
NEWS
February 13, 1994
COUNSELING * UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute offers free telephone counseling sessions from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. through Tuesday. Information: (800) 825-9989. * Senior Health and Peer Counseling sponsors free crisis counseling to Westside residents who need help dealing with the emotional impact of the Northridge quake. Counselors are available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Ken Edwards Center, 1527 4th St. in Santa Monica. Counselors are also available to make home visits.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1990 | BARRY LYNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Elvira Elguera wants to wash her hair. Store owner Ricardo Correa would love to sell her shampoo. But there'll be no sale today. The shampoo has no price. "Absurd!" Elguera declares as she stalks out of the shop. "I don't know what my costs are," Correa tries to explain. "It's better not to sell than to sell at a loss." Peruvians have lived for years under the shelter of price controls and subsidies.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1998 | VANIA GRANDI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was practically a daily ritual: Stroll to the baker to buy a loaf of crusty "pagnotta" hot from the oven. Then visit the fish vendor a few doors down to see what's fresh. Maybe stop to chat with the woman at the vegetable stand on the corner. But Italy's mom-and-pop shops are rapidly becoming folklore.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2008 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
For maybe five times in the last 15 years, Manuela Mendez has had to drag herself to work at a fast-food restaurant in La Mirada, coughing and congested. "I go to work because we need the money," she said in Spanish. "It's difficult to work. I carry microbes that contaminate my work mates, and that's a problem for the customers."
BUSINESS
February 28, 2001 | ALBERT B. CRENSHAW, WASHINGTON POST
One of the ongoing beefs of both small-business owners and the people who work for them is the difficulty of obtaining--and paying for--health insurance. While big companies routinely offer this important benefit to workers, small firms all too often find that they are unable to afford it, and in some cases that it is unavailable at any cost. Easing this crunch is at the top of the legislative agendas of small-business groups for the new Congress.
OPINION
March 11, 2012
Mary Brown, whose case against the 2010 healthcare reform law is pending before the Supreme Court, argues that the government shouldn't be able to force her to carry health insurance. Joined by three other individuals and a small-business trade association, she's asking the justices to rule that the law's insurance mandate is unconstitutional and that the rest of the act should be thrown out with it. But new revelations about her own situation make the case for the other side.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1996 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small business will test its political muscle next week when Congress takes up a vote on the minimum wage and considers a $7-billion package of small business tax measures. The last time the minimum wage was raised, in 1989, the voice of small business was barely a whisper over the roar of labor unions and big corporations. But this time, small business has dominated the debate.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1998 | Vicki Torres, Times staff writer Vicki Torres can be reached at (213) 237-6553 or via e-mail at vicki.torres@latimes.com
For small business, 1998 was a year of new developments, previews and announcements that remain to be worked out in 1999. If the "devil is in the details," as the saying goes, small business should pay close attention as the year 2000 computer-bug problem looms, a new state governor takes office, Los Angeles city tax reforms work their way to the ballot and an assortment of federal and local measures affect small businesses.
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