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Small Business Southern California

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BUSINESS
September 22, 1998
The Times begins a series of articles Wednesday on the state of small business in Southern California, based on a first-of-its-kind poll of 30,000 businesses from San Diego to Ventura. The poll was conducted by The Times and the USC Marshall School of Business. Among the findings: A majority of business owners do not believe critical problems that existed during the recession--government regulation, worker training and access to capital--have been addressed.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Technology is changing so rapidly it's hard to predict where it will be even five years from now. But here are some trends that give a glimpse into the future. * Already, technology lets entrepreneurs conduct business just about any place and any time. Working anywhere will become even easier when cell phones, pagers and other hand-held devices can communicate with one another.
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NEWS
April 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the next two decades, 66,000 small businesses will be regulated by the South Coast Air Quality Management District in its push to clean the region's skies. "That is a substantial portion of the economic-industrial base of this area," said John C. Wise, deputy regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "Many of these firms have never had to deal with air pollution controls before."
BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, Times Staff Writer
Alfred E. Mann is one of those rare entrepreneurs who represents both the past and the future of the Los Angeles economy. The physicist got his start developing missile technology for the U.S. military and solar cells for the space program, transferring those skills to biomedicine decades before anyone had ever heard of the term "defense conversion." He built Pacesetter Inc. into one of the world's leading manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers before selling it in 1985.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1998 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violent crime may be down nationwide, but the petty variety plagues many small businesses, trapping them in an endless battle with vandals and vagrants and saddling them with costs they can ill afford, according to a survey conducted by The Times and USC's Marshall School of Business. Southern California business owners who responded to the survey said opening shop often means facing fresh graffiti, rousting the homeless from doorways or hosing down parking lots that double as toilets.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1995 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph LaStella makes an unusual product in an unusual place. LaStella's company, Battery Automated Transportation International, produces electric cars and bicycles in the high-ceiling hollows of an old Lockheed factory in Burbank that is now home to Calstart, a public-private consortium devoted to nurturing an advanced transportation industry in California. There, Calstart operates Project Hatchery, a so-called "business incubator" that helps companies get a start in business.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Technology is changing so rapidly it's hard to predict where it will be even five years from now. But here are some trends that give a glimpse into the future. * Already, technology lets entrepreneurs conduct business just about any place and any time. Working anywhere will become even easier when cell phones, pagers and other hand-held devices can communicate with one another.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, Times Staff Writer
Alfred E. Mann is one of those rare entrepreneurs who represents both the past and the future of the Los Angeles economy. The physicist got his start developing missile technology for the U.S. military and solar cells for the space program, transferring those skills to biomedicine decades before anyone had ever heard of the term "defense conversion." He built Pacesetter Inc. into one of the world's leading manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers before selling it in 1985.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | VICKI TORRES
Not long ago small business was winning praise from government leaders and economists for helping to pull the United States out of recession. After all, it was small companies that were creating the new jobs while Fortune 500 companies were laying off workers. But small firms now seem to be falling out of the spotlight and out of favor.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1998 | Daryl Strickland
Businesses owned by women of color are quickly spreading. Growing three times faster than any other sector in small business, their firms employ 1.7 million people and generate $184 billion in sales. And more of these firms are located in Los Angeles and Orange County--146,000 or about 14% overall--than anywhere else in the country, according to the National Foundation for Women Business Owners. Recognizing the collective impact of more than 8 million women-owned firms, the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | VICKI TORRES
Not long ago small business was winning praise from government leaders and economists for helping to pull the United States out of recession. After all, it was small companies that were creating the new jobs while Fortune 500 companies were laying off workers. But small firms now seem to be falling out of the spotlight and out of favor.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | MARC BALLON, Times Staff Writer
Howard Schultz, the 46-year-old chairman and chief executive of Starbucks Coffee Co., knows a thing or two about small business. After all, it wasn't all that long ago that Starbucks was one itself. In 1982, the year Schultz joined the company as director of operations and marketing, Starbucks had only four stores. Today, the Seattle-based behemoth has more than 2,000 retail outlets worldwide, including a number in Asia, Europe and the Middle East. The $1.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latino entrepreneurs in the Southland whose companies gross more than a million dollars a year are vigorously optimistic about the future and serve as a strong source of employment for Latino workers, a survey by the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute shows. Seventy-four percent of respondents from the five-county region expected sales to increase over the next year; only 1% expected a decrease. Half the companies planned to add employees in the next 12 months.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1999 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So where does a fast-growing Southern California business go after getting its first big check from a venture capitalist? Think someplace boring, like straight to the bank. Several regional banks are vying to establish relationships with companies as they receive their first round of venture capital money. After getting a foothold, the banks want to continue their relationship with those firms as they grow and become successful.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1998 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violent crime may be down nationwide, but the petty variety plagues many small businesses, trapping them in an endless battle with vandals and vagrants and saddling them with costs they can ill afford, according to a survey conducted by The Times and USC's Marshall School of Business. Southern California business owners who responded to the survey said opening shop often means facing fresh graffiti, rousting the homeless from doorways or hosing down parking lots that double as toilets.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1997
In the decade since Staples and then Office Depot opened their first stores, the superstore concept has claimed a much larger share of office-product manufacturer shipments. Dollar volume shipped by U.S.
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