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Small Business Survival Committee

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BUSINESS
December 15, 1999 | Associated Press
Advocates for a tax-free Internet urged a federal panel to recommend that Congress take a hands-off approach, but international officials argued that special treatment for e-commerce makes no sense. The first of 37 proposals examined at a two-day meeting by the Advisory Commission on Electronic Commerce was the Internet Tax Elimination Act introduced in Congress by Rep. John R. Kasich (R-Ohio) that would permanently bar sales taxes and other taxes on e-commerce.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 1997 | Reuters
More than 75% of the nation's states would not benefit from deregulation of the electricity market in the short term if Congress tries to impose national guidelines to bring cheaper power to consumers, according to a new report. The report, by the Small Business Survival Committee, comes as Congress is considering legislation to overhaul the $200-billion electricity market and allow consumers and businesses to choose where they buy their power.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California ranks among the worst states in the nation for small business, while neighboring Nevada boasts the nation's best climate for entrepreneurs, according to a report by the Washington-based Small Business Survival Committee. California's low ranking of 44th overall stemmed from its tax structure. The state is tied for the nation's highest top capital gains tax rate, and its gasoline and personal income taxes are among the highest in the nation, the report said.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Broadening his message beyond social issues, GOP presidential hopeful Gary Bauer unveiled on Thursday a sweeping tax reform proposal that would slash taxes on individuals and raise them on businesses. In a speech at the National Press Club here, Bauer proposed a 16% "flat tax" on individuals and businesses, as well as a 20% reduction in Social Security payroll taxes.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's House approval of a bill to abolish the complicated U.S. Tax Code may be a longshot to make it into law. But it's a bull's-eye for the small-business lobby on Capitol Hill. A far-flung signature campaign initiated last fall by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) culminated Wednesday in a narrow 219-209 victory for the measure, which requires Congress to scrap the current code by 2002 in favor of something simpler.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
AT&T Corp.'s agreement over the weekend to pass savings from pending access-fee reductions to customers clears the way for federal regulators to vote this week on a sweeping overhaul of telephone subsidies.
OPINION
January 4, 2004 | James L. Doti
Here are 10 New Year's resolutions for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. While they're not in a particular order, No. 10 clearly is the most significant. 1. OK, so you had to compromise with the Legislature to float a $15-billion bond that's needed to bail out the state for its prior deficits. That compromise involved agreeing to a weak-kneed balanced-budget requirement that lacks the teeth of a rigorous spending rule based on population and inflation growth.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2000 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bill Gates appeared in a television commercial last month to argue his case for keeping Microsoft Corp. intact, Advertising Age columnist Bob Garfield quipped that Microsoft's co-founder and chairman hoped to "look less like Dr. No and more like Mr. Rogers." Wearing a comfortable sweater and an easy smile, Gates provided an amiable and low-key contrast to the testy and forgetful executive who appeared in videotaped testimony shown during the Justice Department's landmark antitrust trial.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kay Heine counted herself among the legions of uninsured Americans until she discovered one of the best-kept secrets in health care: medical savings accounts. The accounts, known as MSAs, combine health insurance and a tax-free savings plan and are available to self-employed workers and employees of some small businesses. The accounts are not a panacea for rising health-care costs.
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