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BUSINESS
October 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
A New England shoe chain walked to the top of the Forbes 1989 list of the "200 Best Small Companies in America." Insurers, specialty retailers and restaurants dominated the rankings but California led all states with the most companies on the Forbes list. Boston-based J. Baker, a newcomer to the list, took top honors with the highest return on equity--a five-year average of 100%, Forbes reported in its Nov. 13 issue.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With recent studies showing small-business confidence levels shaken by the Sept. 11 attacks, and post-attack revenues down by as much as 30%, Congress will consider stepping in to bolster the sector's fortunes. Two bills introduced last week are aimed largely at easing a cash crunch that's growing as skittish consumers delay purchases, banks tighten up on credit and venture capitalists pull in their purse strings.
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BUSINESS
May 3, 1995 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Ukiah furnace manufacturer who thrived in spite of the downsizing of his defense industry clientele was named national small-business person of the year by the U.S. Small Business Administration on Tuesday. Two Orange County companies also received top SBA honors at a Washington luncheon as part of National Small Business Week. Max P. Schlienger, president of Retech Inc.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Brito stepped into his calling at a friend's barbecue last summer, after a toddler in a pink dress stepped in something else. Inspiration struck at the sight of dog droppings clinging to the little girl's polished shoes. While the other adults blanched, Brito realized that he possessed the right stomach for tackling one of dog owners' most dreaded chores. "A light went on," recalled Brito, 32, an apartment manager. "I said to my friend, "Would you pay someone to pick it up?"
BUSINESS
December 5, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Debbie and Ross Goldberg have long invested in the shares of small companies for one simple reason: They can buy some of those stocks cheap. With just a few thousand dollars, the Goldbergs can buy several hundred--sometimes even a few thousand--shares of a little company. If the company does well, the Woodland Hills couple make a killing. Ralph Feldfeber, on the other hand, is a new entrant into the small-company stock market.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With recent studies showing small-business confidence levels shaken by the Sept. 11 attacks, and post-attack revenues down by as much as 30%, Congress will consider stepping in to bolster the sector's fortunes. Two bills introduced last week are aimed largely at easing a cash crunch that's growing as skittish consumers delay purchases, banks tighten up on credit and venture capitalists pull in their purse strings.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | From Reuters
Small-business owners as a group expect the U.S. economy to languish during the second half of the year, with growth below potential, unemployment on the rise and inflation pressures muted, the National Federation of Independent Business said Friday. The trade group said its index of small-business optimism fell 2.3 points in June to 97.2, driven in part by a decline in the portion of firms expecting the economy to improve by year-end.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2001 | ALBERT B. CRENSHAW, THE WASHINGTON POST
Small-business groups applauded the victory of George W. Bush in the presidential contest, but at the same time some conceded the near-equal split on Capitol Hill will force a scaling back of their agenda. They don't expect to come up empty-handed, though. Small business, well represented in every state and congressional district, believes its conviction that "the economy depends on us" will win considerable support among legislators. "We are guardedly optimistic.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's House approval of a bill to abolish the complicated U.S. Tax Code may be a longshot to make it into law. But it's a bull's-eye for the small-business lobby on Capitol Hill. A far-flung signature campaign initiated last fall by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) culminated Wednesday in a narrow 219-209 victory for the measure, which requires Congress to scrap the current code by 2002 in favor of something simpler.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Contract "bundling" remains a hot topic on Capitol Hill, where House legislators have introduced a slew of bills to help ensure that small businesses aren't squeezed out of the roughly $200-billion federal contracting market. A report released last month by Rep. Nydia M. Velazquez (D-N.Y.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | From Reuters
Small-business owners as a group expect the U.S. economy to languish during the second half of the year, with growth below potential, unemployment on the rise and inflation pressures muted, the National Federation of Independent Business said Friday. The trade group said its index of small-business optimism fell 2.3 points in June to 97.2, driven in part by a decline in the portion of firms expecting the economy to improve by year-end.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2001 | ALBERT B. CRENSHAW, THE WASHINGTON POST
Small-business groups applauded the victory of George W. Bush in the presidential contest, but at the same time some conceded the near-equal split on Capitol Hill will force a scaling back of their agenda. They don't expect to come up empty-handed, though. Small business, well represented in every state and congressional district, believes its conviction that "the economy depends on us" will win considerable support among legislators. "We are guardedly optimistic.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Contract "bundling" remains a hot topic on Capitol Hill, where House legislators have introduced a slew of bills to help ensure that small businesses aren't squeezed out of the roughly $200-billion federal contracting market. A report released last month by Rep. Nydia M. Velazquez (D-N.Y.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2000 | From Reuters
Online spending by small businesses in the United States has surged more than 1,000% since 1998 and is expected to grow to $118 billion by 2001, according to a study released Sunday. In 1999, small businesses spent more than $25 billion on products and services via the Web, a significant increase from the $2 billion spent in 1998 and further igniting the already popular trend in business-to-business transactions that has taken the Internet by storm over the last several months.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles-based Latin Business Assn. has joined forces with Mexican counterparts in the state of Jalisco to bolster trade ties among small and medium-sized enterprises here and there. The organization's institute, which offers training and assistance to Latino-owned businesses looking to polish technological, exporting, marketing and other skills, has signed an agreement of cooperation with Jalisco's JALTRADE Institute.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's House approval of a bill to abolish the complicated U.S. Tax Code may be a longshot to make it into law. But it's a bull's-eye for the small-business lobby on Capitol Hill. A far-flung signature campaign initiated last fall by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) culminated Wednesday in a narrow 219-209 victory for the measure, which requires Congress to scrap the current code by 2002 in favor of something simpler.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tax advisers maintain that the current deficit-reduction package has something for everybody--most of it bad. The poor will be hard hit by higher taxes on cigarettes, alcohol and gasoline, while the rich will suffer the loss of many of their deductions. But stockbrokers and small-business owners--and at least some rich investors--may come out ahead. Among the few revenue-losing provisions in this massive package are several that benefit small businesses and the people who invest in them.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1998 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Los Angeles metropolitan area outpaced the rest of the United States as an incubator of small businesses last year, nurturing more than one in 10 of the nation's 100 fastest-growing small enterprises, a survey of Dun & Bradstreet data found. A 72-employee clothing manufacturer in Chatsworth took top honors in the survey conducted for Entrepreneur magazine, logging a 3,300% jump in revenue in 1997.
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