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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At age 13, life changed for Maria Elena Avila in a way that could have seemed like a hardship to some. She saw it as an opportunity. The Avila family was struggling and surviving in Huntington Park after leaving Mexico about eight years earlier. But an injury forced her father from his job as a foundry worker. With a $2,000 bank loan co-signed by his uncle, Salvador Avila opened a small restaurant next to a liquor store.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 40% of African American-owned businesses surveyed by the Census Bureau in 1997 were owned by women, a larger percentage than for any other minority group and for the nation's business community as a whole, according to figures released Thursday.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | Don Lee, Times staff writer
Backing Businesswomen: The California American Women's Economic Development Corp. has opened an office in Irvine. Why? Because Orange County has the third-largest number of women-owned businesses in the country, says the nonprofit organization, citing a report from the U.S. Census Bureau.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1999 | CHRISTINE CASTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The delicate art of twisting locks into braids is no longer just something done for girls by their moms and girlfriends. With the popularity of intricately braided styles, a specialty trade has arisen, and now state legislators are trying to decide how best to regulate, train and certify braiders. Those who braid for a living must know the proper techniques, stylists say, because the wrong techniques can result in permanent hair damage and hair loss.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1990 | MIKE KRENSAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women are starting small businesses at twice the rate of men. If they maintain that pace, women will own nearly 40% of small businesses by the year 2000, according to the Small Business Administration. "It's a trend that's going to continue for a number of reasons," said Kris Morris, a partner with the executive search firm Cowen, Morris, Berger. Morris and other observers attribute the growth to a contraction of middle management and expansion of the number of women entering the work force.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1991 | JANE APPLEGATE
Customers pulling into Steve's Detailing are greeted by a young woman they often mistake for the receptionist. But minutes after meeting with owner Jana Fair, even the most finicky car nut is impressed by her knowledge of cleaning and "detailing" cars. "Sometimes there is an advantage to being a woman in a man's field," said Fair, who works in the parking garage of the First Interstate Bank building in Hollywood. "But the bottom line is: You produce or you don't survive."
BUSINESS
December 23, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alberta Craven is famous in her neighborhood for the sweet potato pies she turns out by the dozen each day at her 27th Street Bakery, just south of downtown. But fame was no match for the Los Angeles riots. When the fires stopped burning last May, Craven had lost half of her commercial customers--and an estimated $50,000 in sales.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, Patrice Apodaca covers economic issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-5979 and at patrice.apodaca@latimes.com
Female entrepreneurs could account for half of all small businesses in the county as the new millennium dawns. According to the 1992 census, there were more than 75,000 small female-owned firms here then, 35% of the total. Rachel Baranick, deputy district director at the Small Business Administration's Orange County office, believes that number will exceed 50% in the next decade, both locally and in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
Nine months after they made a plea for donations to help rebuild businesses in riot-scarred Los Angeles, two Laguna Beach residents have decided to give the money to an organization that helps women launch small businesses. About $6,700 collected for the Laguna Beach for L.A. Fund will go to the Coalition for Women's Economic Development, a Los Angeles group that helps low-income women become self-employed, said Ann Tashjian, who helped create the fund. "It's a wonderful program," Tashjian said.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 40% of African American-owned businesses surveyed by the Census Bureau in 1997 were owned by women, a larger percentage than for any other minority group and for the nation's business community as a whole, according to figures released Thursday.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, Patrice Apodaca covers economic issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-5979 and at patrice.apodaca@latimes.com
Female entrepreneurs could account for half of all small businesses in the county as the new millennium dawns. According to the 1992 census, there were more than 75,000 small female-owned firms here then, 35% of the total. Rachel Baranick, deputy district director at the Small Business Administration's Orange County office, believes that number will exceed 50% in the next decade, both locally and in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At age 13, life changed for Maria Elena Avila in a way that could have seemed like a hardship to some. She saw it as an opportunity. The Avila family was struggling and surviving in Huntington Park after leaving Mexico about eight years earlier. But an injury forced her father from his job as a foundry worker. With a $2,000 bank loan co-signed by his uncle, Salvador Avila opened a small restaurant next to a liquor store.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | Don Lee, Times staff writer
Backing Businesswomen: The California American Women's Economic Development Corp. has opened an office in Irvine. Why? Because Orange County has the third-largest number of women-owned businesses in the country, says the nonprofit organization, citing a report from the U.S. Census Bureau.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1995 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in the relentlessly upbeat world of professional salesmanship, Cynthia Walker is a happy person. She has a quick laugh and energetic manner that have served her well, along with large dollops of tenacity and resourcefulness. In little more than a decade, Walker has jettisoned the corporate world and built an equipment leasing company with revenue that bounces between $1 million and $2 million each year. She helped to found a Los Angeles-based business group called the Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
Nine months after they made a plea for donations to help rebuild businesses in riot-scarred Los Angeles, two Laguna Beach residents have decided to give the money to an organization that helps women launch small businesses. About $6,700 collected for the Laguna Beach for L.A. Fund will go to the Coalition for Women's Economic Development, a Los Angeles group that helps low-income women become self-employed, said Ann Tashjian, who helped create the fund. "It's a wonderful program," Tashjian said.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alberta Craven is famous in her neighborhood for the sweet potato pies she turns out by the dozen each day at her 27th Street Bakery, just south of downtown. But fame was no match for the Los Angeles riots. When the fires stopped burning last May, Craven had lost half of her commercial customers--and an estimated $50,000 in sales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1999 | CHRISTINE CASTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The delicate art of twisting locks into braids is no longer just something done for girls by their moms and girlfriends. With the popularity of intricately braided styles, a specialty trade has arisen, and now state legislators are trying to decide how best to regulate, train and certify braiders. Those who braid for a living must know the proper techniques, stylists say, because the wrong techniques can result in permanent hair damage and hair loss.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1995 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in the relentlessly upbeat world of professional salesmanship, Cynthia Walker is a happy person. She has a quick laugh and energetic manner that have served her well, along with large dollops of tenacity and resourcefulness. In little more than a decade, Walker has jettisoned the corporate world and built an equipment leasing company with revenue that bounces between $1 million and $2 million each year. She helped to found a Los Angeles-based business group called the Assn.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1991 | JANE APPLEGATE
Customers pulling into Steve's Detailing are greeted by a young woman they often mistake for the receptionist. But minutes after meeting with owner Jana Fair, even the most finicky car nut is impressed by her knowledge of cleaning and "detailing" cars. "Sometimes there is an advantage to being a woman in a man's field," said Fair, who works in the parking garage of the First Interstate Bank building in Hollywood. "But the bottom line is: You produce or you don't survive."
BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kaye Bass has come a long way from the days when she answered phone calls and took messages as a receptionist for a Whittier construction company. At 51, the shrewd but soft-spoken Bass runs a thriving Huntington Beach pie and bakery franchise that rang up nearly $3 million in sales last year--just seven years after she opened her first bakery on Balboa Island in Newport Beach. Bass, a mother of three, grandmother of six and president of Katie McGuire's Inc.
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