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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Teresa Ernest's West Hills home, February's torrential rains left the back wall cracked, the master bedroom flooded and the foundation damaged as well. In Whittier, Henry Eickhoff's property was "a couple of feet under water." And at the La Crescenta house of John Gregory, "we had a landslide," which turned the hillside under the deck into a cliff, the 72-year-old retiree recalled.
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BUSINESS
August 22, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The Small Business Administration offers a variety of assistance, including online workshops, seminars and classes. The agency also has step-by-step instructions for starting a business, including tips on market research and creating a business plan. The main national website has links to local SBA district offices throughout the country. Try them at http://www.sba.gov . Click on the tab labeled Small Business Planner for tips on what you may need to know before you start.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Maria Contreras-Sweet, a former California official who founded a Los Angeles community bank, to head the federal Small Business Administration. Contreras-Sweet was approved Thursday by voice vote to the Cabinet position, which helps small businesses with loans and other assistance. She takes over for Karen Mills, a former venture capitalist who stepped down as the agency's administrator last year. President Obama said Contreras-Sweet "understands what it means to start a small business" and has "a proven track record of helping other small businesses succeed.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | TIM BOVEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government's flagship program for minority entrepreneurs awarded $19 billion in contracts over the last six years, with the lion's share going to firms whose headquarters were located in primarily white, well-to-do neighborhoods. An Associated Press computer analysis of "minority set-aside" contracts handled by the Small Business Administration found that just 22% of the project dollars went to companies located in minority areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy growing up in Los Angeles 30 years ago, Oscar Wright was deeply affected by the changing nature of his South-Central neighborhood. Once a thriving community that supported small, family-owned businesses, the area began to decline as poverty, crime and drugs gained a foothold. Today, many of the stores that Wright and his family patronized are boarded up, defaced with graffiti and the unsubtle artwork of gang members.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a special agent with the U.S. government, Terri Price has been trained to operate high-tech surveillance equipment, to sweep crime scenes for the most delicate clues, and to fire a 9-millimeter Beretta handgun with deadly accuracy. But Price's investigations only occasionally require surveillance, rarely involve crime scenes and never end in shootouts.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a drive to boost its presence in the small-business market, Glendale Federal Bank said Monday that it will pay $63 million to buy TransWorld Bancorp of Sherman Oaks, which specializes in Small Business Administration loans. Glendale Federal will pay $18.25 per share for TransWorld's stock, which climbed $1.625 per share on news of the deal Monday to close at $17.375 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2009 | Associated Press
Because of lax oversight, undeserving firms collected millions in federal contracts from an $8-billion government program designated for small businesses in poor neighborhoods, congressional investigators charge.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein
At a repair shop for airplane propellers near Van Nuys Airport, Keith Hironaka bends over a long metal blade, smoothing its mottled surface and preparing it for inspection. His brother Glenn works a few feet away. Fifteen people depend on Executive Propellers for their jobs, and owner Eissa Shousha figures an additional 60 or so -- wives, children, aging parents -- rely on the salaries he pays and the health insurance he provides. But business is slow, as many owners of small planes have cut back on flying and put off refurbishing their aircraft in the recession.
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