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BUSINESS
February 16, 2009 | Cyndia Zwahlen
While politicians in Washington tinkered with the final compromise version of the $787-billion economic stimulus bill Thursday night, Alonso Arellano was working late in his office, putting the final touches on his own economic stimulus package. His bid to boost consumer spending was to launch the next day, when lunch customers at his La Adelita restaurant in Sun Valley could pay just $4.99 for a scaled-down serving of chili rellenos, chicken mole, chili verde, beef stew or other popular dishes.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Maria Contreras-Sweet, a former California official who founded a Los Angeles community bank, to head the federal Small Business Administration. Contreras-Sweet was approved Thursday by voice vote to the Cabinet position, which helps small businesses with loans and other assistance. She takes over for Karen Mills, a former venture capitalist who stepped down as the agency's administrator last year. President Obama said Contreras-Sweet "understands what it means to start a small business" and has "a proven track record of helping other small businesses succeed.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The Small Business Administration offers a variety of assistance, including online workshops, seminars and classes. The agency also has step-by-step instructions for starting a business, including tips on market research and creating a business plan. The main national website has links to local SBA district offices throughout the country. Try them at http://www.sba.gov . Click on the tab labeled Small Business Planner for tips on what you may need to know before you start. If you have hit a snag in developing your business or need advice from someone who's been there, try an organization called Score.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | TIM BOVEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government's flagship program for minority entrepreneurs awarded $19 billion in contracts over the last six years, with the lion's share going to firms whose headquarters were located in primarily white, well-to-do neighborhoods. An Associated Press computer analysis of "minority set-aside" contracts handled by the Small Business Administration found that just 22% of the project dollars went to companies located in minority areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy growing up in Los Angeles 30 years ago, Oscar Wright was deeply affected by the changing nature of his South-Central neighborhood. Once a thriving community that supported small, family-owned businesses, the area began to decline as poverty, crime and drugs gained a foothold. Today, many of the stores that Wright and his family patronized are boarded up, defaced with graffiti and the unsubtle artwork of gang members.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a special agent with the U.S. government, Terri Price has been trained to operate high-tech surveillance equipment, to sweep crime scenes for the most delicate clues, and to fire a 9-millimeter Beretta handgun with deadly accuracy. But Price's investigations only occasionally require surveillance, rarely involve crime scenes and never end in shootouts.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a drive to boost its presence in the small-business market, Glendale Federal Bank said Monday that it will pay $63 million to buy TransWorld Bancorp of Sherman Oaks, which specializes in Small Business Administration loans. Glendale Federal will pay $18.25 per share for TransWorld's stock, which climbed $1.625 per share on news of the deal Monday to close at $17.375 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
About $1 of every $5 in loans the Small Business Administration directly made to companies hurt by the Sept. 11 attacks has fallen into default, leaving the government with an uphill effort to recover millions of dollars in taxpayer money. The agency is just now learning about the magnitude of businesses that went under or stopped making payments. Its Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy seven families whose homes were damaged by last week's massive earthquake received one the first infusions of federal cash Wednesday in Van Nuys when the Small Business Administration handed out $2.5 million in disaster relief loans. The first check went to Eli Landaverde of Arleta, a 24-year-old stock clerk, who picked up the initial $10,000 installment of his $25,700 loan at the Mid San Fernando Valley Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday afternoon.
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