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BUSINESS
January 7, 2002
Executive Roundtable is a weekly column by TEC Worldwide, an international organization of more than 7,000 business owners, company presidents and chief executives. TEC members meet in small peer groups to share their business experiences and help each other solve problems in a round-table session. The following questions and answers are summaries of discussions at recent TEC meetings in Southern California.
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BUSINESS
January 7, 2002
Executive Roundtable is a weekly column by TEC Worldwide, an international organization of more than 7,000 business owners, company presidents and chief executives. TEC members meet in small peer groups to share their business experiences and help each other solve problems in a round-table session. The following questions and answers are summaries of discussions at recent TEC meetings in Southern California.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 1999 | JUAN HOVEY
For the entrepreneur, financing a business start-up is a tough do-it-yourself affair fraught with danger. In almost every case, the entrepreneur must use personal resources to get the enterprise up and running, scraping together money from personal savings, friends and family, a second mortgage, credit cards and, on rare occasions, an angel investor.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1999 | JUAN HOVEY
Insurance premiums show signs of increasing for the first time in more than a decade, and although the increases do not yet threaten most small businesses, it's probably a good idea to assume that they will. As a practical matter, this means that it's time to pay extra attention to workplace safety. If premiums do turn upward for business as a whole, your best defense is to keep losses down--and that, by and large, means avoiding claims in the first place.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1999 | JUAN HOVEY
Insurance premiums show signs of increasing for the first time in more than a decade, and although the increases do not yet threaten most small businesses, it's probably a good idea to assume that they will. As a practical matter, this means that it's time to pay extra attention to workplace safety. If premiums do turn upward for business as a whole, your best defense is to keep losses down--and that, by and large, means avoiding claims in the first place.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1999 | JUAN HOVEY
Starting a business and growing one are different things--and when it comes to rounding up outside capital, the sooner the entrepreneur learns the difference, the better. The entrepreneur and the manager are different people with different skills. Entrepreneurs know how to start businesses; managers know how to grow them. Entrepreneurs give birth to the idea; managers bring the idea to maturity by making it into a business enterprise.
NEWS
February 13, 1994
How It Works Southland bankers and other lenders should rethink how they finance small businesses. Also, local government should boost efforts to encourage entrepreneurship. For the banks, a key step would be to change small-business lending policies that now are dependent on the use of real estate as collateral. Because of the Southland's depressed real estate market, many small businesses no longer have the option of using property as collateral.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In hard times, a cash-starved small business often gets nowhere with its local bank. But experts say struggling entrepreneurs may have more cash-raising options than they realize. "There are now many, many different ways of financing a company," said Tiffany Meyer Haugen, director of a small-business development program at the UCI Graduate School of Management. "The more you know about the options, the greater the chance you will pick a financing tool that's right for your company."
BUSINESS
September 8, 1999 | JUAN HOVEY
For the entrepreneur, financing a business start-up is a tough do-it-yourself affair fraught with danger. In almost every case, the entrepreneur must use personal resources to get the enterprise up and running, scraping together money from personal savings, friends and family, a second mortgage, credit cards and, on rare occasions, an angel investor.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1999 | JUAN HOVEY
Starting a business and growing one are different things--and when it comes to rounding up outside capital, the sooner the entrepreneur learns the difference, the better. The entrepreneur and the manager are different people with different skills. Entrepreneurs know how to start businesses; managers know how to grow them. Entrepreneurs give birth to the idea; managers bring the idea to maturity by making it into a business enterprise.
NEWS
February 13, 1994
How It Works Southland bankers and other lenders should rethink how they finance small businesses. Also, local government should boost efforts to encourage entrepreneurship. For the banks, a key step would be to change small-business lending policies that now are dependent on the use of real estate as collateral. Because of the Southland's depressed real estate market, many small businesses no longer have the option of using property as collateral.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In hard times, a cash-starved small business often gets nowhere with its local bank. But experts say struggling entrepreneurs may have more cash-raising options than they realize. "There are now many, many different ways of financing a company," said Tiffany Meyer Haugen, director of a small-business development program at the UCI Graduate School of Management. "The more you know about the options, the greater the chance you will pick a financing tool that's right for your company."
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