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March 4, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Space Applications Corp. announced Friday that it plans to move its headquarters from Orange County to Vienna, Va., no alarm was raised by local business-retention agencies, and no red team was mobilized to persuade the tiny company to change its mind.
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BUSINESS
March 4, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Space Applications Corp. announced Friday that it plans to move its headquarters from Orange County to Vienna, Va., no alarm was raised by local business-retention agencies, and no red team was mobilized to persuade the tiny company to change its mind.
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NEWS
May 19, 1989
COUNTY SMALL BUSINESS BY INDUSTRY Total 50 or Fewer Employees Type of Business Businesses Total % AGRICULTURE Crop production 39 34 87 Livestock & Poultry 6 6 100 Agriculture/Livestock Services 391 388 99 Landscape Services 449 432 96 Timber Tracts 8 8 100 Commercial Fishing 3 3 100 MINING Minerals 12 12 100 Oil & Natural Gas 72 69 96 CONSTRUCTION Residential Contractors 831 824 99 Commercial, Industrial 355 348 98 Heavy Construction 212 202...
NEWS
May 19, 1989
Over the past two decades, Orange County has enjoyed what economists call a relatively recession-proof economy. The secret is the unusual diversity of the county's business base: many small companies add up to a large and healthy economy. It is an economy that will generate a gross county product--the value of all goods and services produced locally--of $65 billion this year, according to estimates by economist James Doti, acting president of Chapman College in Orange. There are so many businesses in the county that no single company or industry dominates its fate.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
First, the counter worker called in sick. Then the other sales clerk said he would be late because he had to meet with his kid's teacher. Meanwhile, a reporter was pestering Bill Koenig for information about his Postal Instant Press franchise. "I'm all by myself," the harried PIP owner said. "Can you call back late today?" It was a typical scene. As the self-described owner, manager and janitor of the PIP store in Anaheim, Koenig has been coping with his store's day-to-day disasters for 20 years.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
So you think you're an entrepreneur? Well, if you own your own business, you most likely are, even if you don't quite match the popular perception of the entrepreneur as a quintessential risk-taking, reward-seeking, enterprising innovator. For while someone like computer maven Steven Jobs is without question an entrepreneur, not all entrepreneurs are like Jobs. Most, however, are small-business owners. A study by the National Science Foundation shows that most of the innovations in American business and technology in the past 15 years have come from small businesses.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
In late March--after months of deliberation--the Orange County Board of Supervisors adopted a growth-management plan designed to defuse one of the most divisive issues in years. Had it been up to the county's small-business owners, however, the plan might not have passed at all. Exactly half of the 522 participants in The Times Small-Business Survey said they opposed "having Orange County officials place stricter controls on local growth and development." Even so, most were willing to spare some change to deal with the consequences of growth: Nearly two in three supported a sales-tax increase to fund road improvements.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
Something has happened in the 33 years since William H. Whyte Jr. wrote "The Organization Man" and everyone wanted to work for a corporate giant like IBM. Whyte's paean to big business celebrated the millions of Americans who donned gray suits and "left home, spiritually as well as physically, to take the vows of organization." Their middle management values, he wrote, would "set the American temper" for years to come. Somehow, in the intervening decades, those values seem to have lost their luster.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
So you think you're an entrepreneur? Well, if you own your own business, you most likely are, even if you don't quite match the popular perception of the entrepreneur as a quintessential risk-taking, reward-seeking, enterprising innovator. For while someone like computer maven Steven Jobs is without question an entrepreneur, not all entrepreneurs are like Jobs. Most, however, are small-business owners. A study by the National Science Foundation shows that most of the innovations in American business and technology in the past 15 years have come from small businesses.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
One day each month, Thomas Gaglio and a crew of fellow beauticians from the Thomas Jsalon in Newport Beach head to Orangewood Children's Foundation for a day of hair styling. The clients: abused and neglected children, 20 to 40 at a time. The bill: $00.00. It's a service that Orangewood might not get otherwise, said William G. Steiner, Orangewood's director. And for the recipients, it's not just a matter of money. "Many of these girls have been molested," Steiner said. "This is tremendous in increasing their self-esteem, just this one activity."
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
Hoan Le's first break came when he went to work at VN Printing, his cousin's shop, soon after arriving in Orange County from Vietnam in 1981. There he learned the rudiments of the printing trade and enrolled in vocational school. His second break came 3 years later, after a succession of jobs in other print shops scattered throughout Little Saigon. In 1984, a friend at AA Printing loaned Le equipment so he could open his own establishment. Today, a listing for Le's Printing is nestled among 10 pages of ads and entries in the 1989 Vietnamese Business Directory; his is one of 31 such enterprises clustered in and around the heart of the Vietnamese business enclave.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
All around the country, in growing numbers, people are closing their eyes, gritting their teeth, mortgaging their homes, cashing in their retirement accounts and taking the biggest crap shoot of their careers by starting their own businesses. And nowhere is the entrepreneurial urge more evident than in Orange County, where nearly 100 new businesses were begun each working day last year. Orange County, in fact, has become a hotbed of small-business activity, a petri dish culture of cutting-edge capitalism.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
Dana Karcher, 36-year-old scion of one of Orange County's best-known family businesses, is a corporate refugee. Karcher is the son of Donald Karcher, president of the Carl's Jr. fast-food chain. Despite the obvious opportunities at Carl Karcher Enterprises in Anaheim, he decided at an early age he wanted to make it on his own. So he became a certified public accountant and joined an Orange County accounting firm. But it didn't provide the fulfillment he was seeking. "I wanted to get out and get involved in the decision making and the operations," he said.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
First, the counter worker called in sick. Then the other sales clerk said he would be late because he had to meet with his kid's teacher. Meanwhile, a reporter was pestering Bill Koenig for information about his Postal Instant Press franchise. "I'm all by myself," the harried PIP owner said. "Can you call back late today?" It was a typical scene. As the self-described owner, manager and janitor of the PIP store in Anaheim, Koenig has been coping with his store's day-to-day disasters for 20 years.
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