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Small Change

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OPINION
November 3, 2005
I'm not convinced that a rise in spending by Iraqis is a "sign of optimism" (Nov. 2). Has your reporter ever heard the expression "spending like there's no tomorrow"? I rather suspect that to be the case. CHRISTOPHER GRIFFITHS Leeds, United Kingdom
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 27, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Even as Republicans in the House and Senate begin efforts to pass narrow immigration bills in the lame-duck session, closed-door negotiations have begun over how to accomplish a much broader package of immigration reforms next year. Three Republican senators introduced an alternative to the Dream Act on Tuesday that would give legal status to young immigrants brought to the U.S. unlawfully as children. Later this week, the House is expected to vote on a bill that would increase the number of visas for technology jobs, while reducing other legal immigration.
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HEALTH
January 2, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Barbara Unsworth, Chino Hills My first small change was to participate in Jazzercise classes two or three times per week, purely for fun. The movement felt good, as did the positive social ambience. After six months or so, I noticed a slight change in the way my clothes fit. The next step was to purchase a scale to see what this change in my clothes was about. With pounds slowly but surely coming off, at the rate of about a pound per month, I became motivated to watch my food intake.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Small increases in the amount of sleep a child gets can improve behavior at school by a significant amount, while slight decreases in sleep can make them more likely to act out, according to a new study. The authors say that the study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, is the first controlled investigation of the effect of sleep extension or reduction on the behavior of healthy children at school. The researchers split 34 children ages 7 to 11 into two groups of 17, extending the sleep of one group by up to an hour and reducing the sleep of the other group by about the same amount.
SPORTS
October 31, 2000 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ
Some people might not have given a nickel for Moorpark College's chances of beating Canyons in their Western State Conference football game Saturday. Coach Jim Bittner and defensive coordinator Marcus Turner figured a nickel was exactly what the Raiders needed to stop Canyons' explosive passing game. "We played the nickel [defense] the whole game," Bittner said.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1991 | KEVIN E. CULLINANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day in 1984, when crowds poured into Los Angeles for the Summer Olympics, David Gold and Thomas Hale made a $185,000 buy that would launch their 99 Cents Only Stores into the mainstream and foreshadow the future of their quirky off-priced outlets. Gold and Hale, president and vice president of 99 Cents Only Stores, had bought 500,000 authentic Olympic souvenir hats at a special low price--37 cents each--days before the games commenced.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1998 | JEFFREY ULBRICH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's such a simple thing: You shove a coin through the slot, you get your Coke. Or your coffee. Or your candy bar. Europeans perform this uncomplicated act millions of times a day. In airports, offices, railway stations, hallways, arcades. Then along comes the 15-nation European Union with plans to change the money, a new single European currency to be called the euro. The euro, which probably will be worth slightly more than a U.S.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | GORDON DILLOW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his 35 years at the Downey Cemetery, Hank Spears has seen some weird things left behind by visitors with a penchant for the occult--burnt candles, beribboned bird carcasses, even a decapitated goat. But the thing with the coconuts leaves Hank scratching his head. "Coconuts are a big thing now, for some reason," the cemetery superintendent said as he sat in the shade of a camphor tree, surrounded by graves that date as far as 1868. "They leave fresh fruit too, bananas, apples, oranges.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Luke Folger was in a mild state of panic. His one-man-band contraption had gone dead in front of three rows of judges, and time was ticking by. Folger knelt on the floor of Grand Central Terminal and rummaged through a jumble of cables and plugs, trying to figure out what was wrong. A violinist-juggler act was waiting to take the stage. So were an urban-acid-jazz guitarist and a onetime"American Idol"contestant. Perhaps worst of all: Another one-man band was in the wings, his snare drum, cymbals, tambourine and horns all working as he warmed up behind a black curtain inside the famous transit station.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Paul O'Neill took over the floundering Aluminum Co. of America in October 1987, he shocked attendees at an introductory news conference by proclaiming that his focus would not be on expanding sales or improving profitability. Rather, he said, his emphasis would be on improving employee safety. Investors at the conference thought he was crazy and rushed from the room to tell their clients to sell Alcoa stock immediately. "It was literally the worst piece of advice I gave in my entire career," one later said.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
In these recessionary times, it's hard to believe that travelers left behind $19,110 in change at security checkpoints at Los Angeles International Airport during 2010. USA Today reports that as a nation we "forgot" about $400,000 in loose change at airports nationwide that same year. The same story says $15,908 was left at San Francisco International and that $46,918, the highest amount at a single airport, was left at JFK International Airport. Part of this might be sheer forgetfulness from folks emptying their pockets for security screenings, but it also might be waning interest in coins as legal tender.
HEALTH
January 2, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Barbara Unsworth, Chino Hills My first small change was to participate in Jazzercise classes two or three times per week, purely for fun. The movement felt good, as did the positive social ambience. After six months or so, I noticed a slight change in the way my clothes fit. The next step was to purchase a scale to see what this change in my clothes was about. With pounds slowly but surely coming off, at the rate of about a pound per month, I became motivated to watch my food intake.
OPINION
December 7, 2011 | By Tamar Jacoby
Among Republican presidential candidates, it's been demagoguery as usual. Why have a substantive debate when you can exchange inflammatory sound bites instead, especially on immigration? But something surprising happened last week far from the campaign trail — on Capitol Hill, of all places. Just when we thought Congress would never act to address the nation's broken immigration system, members of the House made a critical breakthrough, voting overwhelmingly to approve a fix that will make American companies more competitive and the immigration system fairer and more welcoming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
California should more aggressively enforce the state's ban on wasteful water use and crack down on inefficient irrigation practices, a state watermaster recommends. In a report that will be presented next week to the State Water Resources Control Board, Delta Watermaster Craig Wilson wades into a potentially explosive area of water law: the "reasonable use" doctrine in the state Constitution. The principle, reinforced in statute and court decisions, holds that a water right does not include the right to waste water and mandates that "the water resources of the state be put to beneficial use. " Although it's a cornerstone of California law, the clause has been enforced mostly on a case-by-case basis, usually when one person claims another's water use is unreasonable.
SPORTS
April 23, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
One small change had a big impact in helping the Canucks pull even with the Kings and turn their playoff series into a best-of-three matchup entering Game 5 on Friday at GM Place. Vancouver Coach Alain Vigneault's decision to take Alex Burrows off the top line and move Mikael Samuelsson on the wing with twins Daniel and Henrik Sedin was pivotal to the Canucks' 6-4 victory Wednesday. The Sedins combined for five points in the final period, and Samuelsson continued his streak of scoring at least one goal in every game.
TRAVEL
October 4, 2009
You're not the only passenger getting dinged for rebooking a flight. In the first half of this year, U.S. airlines collected more than $1 billion in fees from customers who paid to rebook or cancel reservations. Here, the top 10 collectors of such fees and what they charged in the first two quarters of the year (in millions): Source: U.S. Department of Transportation's Bureau of Transportation Statistics for domestic and international flights -- Airline 1st quarter 2nd quarter 1st half totals 1. American $115.
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