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NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Four years ago, GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin -- then a relatively obscure governor of a remote state -- made a barn-burning speech at the Republican National Convention that vastly exceeded the punditry's (admittedly low) expectations. Although things went downhill from there for Palin, it was a clutch performance that helped establish the then-governor of Alaska as a national figure. The expectations will be quite a bit higher for Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), the GOP's current nominee for vice president, when he steps up to the microphone Wednesday night.
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NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Democrats struggling to combat a flood of outside money pouring in to defeat their candidates have found at least a temporary solution: If you can't beat them, brand them. The latest strategy of Democratic messaging is tying Republican candidates and policies to the party's most prominent - and at times vilified - financial patrons, billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) initiated the strategy last month when he decried the brothers - whose last name is pronounced "coke" - from the Senate floor as "shadowy billionaires" and "un-American.
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OPINION
September 4, 2012 | By Steven Conn
Every four years Americans are presented with different visions of the future and are asked to choose between them. This year, we've been told, the choice is between two conceptions of government: small versus big. The Republican presidential ticket of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan has promised to "restore" America to its "small government" past. Any vision of the future is built upon a certain understanding of the past. Although past and future are inextricably linked, we spend much less time evaluating candidates as historians than we do assessing their skills as fortunetellers able to predict the future.
OPINION
March 2, 2013
Re “ Oyster fight has many interested parties ,” Feb. 24 So let me get this straight. The Lunny family buys an oyster farm in 2005 in Drakes Estero at the Point Reyes National Seashore, knowing that it is slated to close in 2012 based on a 40-year-old agreement between the then-owners and the National Park Service, which provides that at its end, the area will convert to marine wilderness. Now Kevin Lunny is suing the federal government so he can renege on the agreement while, at the same time, paying below-market rent on the lease and low rates for grazing on 1,100 acres of federal land on which the family conducts a profitable cattle business.
OPINION
May 6, 2012 | By Arnold Schwarzenegger
It was Richard Nixon who brought me into the Republican fold. He was running for president, and I had recently arrived in California from Austria, which I'd left because the European socialist mentality wasn't big enough for my dreams. Growing up, I was surrounded by kids whose greatest ambition was to one day collect a pension. I didn't intend to spend my whole life dreaming about floating on a government safety net. One day, when Nixon was talking on the television, my liberal friend Artie translated bits of what he was saying.
OPINION
October 30, 2012
Re "Evangelicals get behind Romney," Oct. 26 The fact that evangelical Christians have decided to back Mitt Romney because he supports "biblical principles" is alarming. This, then, would seem to entail the subordination of women and the exclusion of not only the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community but atheists and people of every faith but Christian. Like many Republicans, I believe in small government; however, a government that practices the biblical principles that give rise to misogyny and bigotry is very big government, plainly a Christian theocracy.
OPINION
January 24, 2009 | Mickey Edwards, Mickey Edwards is a former U.S. congressman, a lecturer at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School and the author of "Reclaiming Conservatism."
In my mind's eye, I can see Ronald Reagan, wearing wings and a Stetson, perched on a cloud and watching all the goings-on down here in his old earthly home. Laughing, rolling his eyes and whacking his forehead over the absurdities he sees, he's watching his old political party as it twists itself into ever more complex knots, punctuated only by pauses to invoke the Gipper's name.
OPINION
March 2, 2013
Re “ Oyster fight has many interested parties ,” Feb. 24 So let me get this straight. The Lunny family buys an oyster farm in 2005 in Drakes Estero at the Point Reyes National Seashore, knowing that it is slated to close in 2012 based on a 40-year-old agreement between the then-owners and the National Park Service, which provides that at its end, the area will convert to marine wilderness. Now Kevin Lunny is suing the federal government so he can renege on the agreement while, at the same time, paying below-market rent on the lease and low rates for grazing on 1,100 acres of federal land on which the family conducts a profitable cattle business.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
If this country wants to get its fiscal house in order, the thinking goes, it needs all the money it can get. And in the small town of Vernal, Utah -- population 9,248 -- George Burnett is doing his part. The owner of “I Love Drilling Juice & Smoothie Bar” is charging self-identified liberal customers $1 more than their conservative counterparts for a 16-ounce smoothie, The Times reported Tuesday. So let me get this straight. Burnett, whose business is in Uintah County -- where 10,001 voters, or 90%, went for Mitt Romney and most of the remaining votes went to liberals -- is taxing the 10% a buck apiece?
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
There are two types of customers at George Burnett's juice shop in Vernal, Utah. The conservative kind pays $4.95 for a 16-ounce juice or smoothie. But call yourself a liberal? Get ready to shell out an extra dollar. Burnett figures it's a way to make a “very public” point about his thoughts on American fiscal policy. “Really what I'm focused on is the fiscal differences between big government, small government and liberal ways, as far as entitlements and spending,” he told KSL-TV Channel 5 in Salt Lake City.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
If this country wants to get its fiscal house in order, the thinking goes, it needs all the money it can get. And in the small town of Vernal, Utah -- population 9,248 -- George Burnett is doing his part. The owner of “I Love Drilling Juice & Smoothie Bar” is charging self-identified liberal customers $1 more than their conservative counterparts for a 16-ounce smoothie, The Times reported Tuesday. So let me get this straight. Burnett, whose business is in Uintah County -- where 10,001 voters, or 90%, went for Mitt Romney and most of the remaining votes went to liberals -- is taxing the 10% a buck apiece?
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
There are two types of customers at George Burnett's juice shop in Vernal, Utah. The conservative kind pays $4.95 for a 16-ounce juice or smoothie. But call yourself a liberal? Get ready to shell out an extra dollar. Burnett figures it's a way to make a “very public” point about his thoughts on American fiscal policy. “Really what I'm focused on is the fiscal differences between big government, small government and liberal ways, as far as entitlements and spending,” he told KSL-TV Channel 5 in Salt Lake City.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2013 | David Lauter
Congress has become the butt of late-night comedians for waiting until the last minute to do any work, yet its procrastination involves something more than fecklessness: The issue over which it keeps stumbling not only separates its two parties into warring camps, but divides them internally. At its core, the debate over the size of government and how to pay for it pits the interests of the huge baby boom generation, now mostly in their 50s and 60s, against the needs of the even larger cohort in their teens and 20s. With limited government money to spend, how much should go to paying medical bills for retirees versus subsidizing college loans, job training and healthcare for young families with children?
OPINION
November 8, 2012
Re “ Blue reign in Sacramento ,” Nov. 8 In recent years, California Republicans have focused on signing pledges and on intransigence instead of engaging constructively to get things done. This has resulted in draconian cuts to schools, state programs and services. On Tuesday, the people of California said, “Fine, we'll do it without you,” and now the Democrats in the Legislature are on the cusp of a super-majority. That's a shame. While we Californians trend to the left, we need a robust two-party system in our state to curb the excesses from both sides of the aisle (and there are excesses on both sides)
OPINION
October 30, 2012
Re "Evangelicals get behind Romney," Oct. 26 The fact that evangelical Christians have decided to back Mitt Romney because he supports "biblical principles" is alarming. This, then, would seem to entail the subordination of women and the exclusion of not only the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community but atheists and people of every faith but Christian. Like many Republicans, I believe in small government; however, a government that practices the biblical principles that give rise to misogyny and bigotry is very big government, plainly a Christian theocracy.
OPINION
September 4, 2012 | By Steven Conn
Every four years Americans are presented with different visions of the future and are asked to choose between them. This year, we've been told, the choice is between two conceptions of government: small versus big. The Republican presidential ticket of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan has promised to "restore" America to its "small government" past. Any vision of the future is built upon a certain understanding of the past. Although past and future are inextricably linked, we spend much less time evaluating candidates as historians than we do assessing their skills as fortunetellers able to predict the future.
NEWS
August 26, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Comparisons between the Democratic National Convention that opens today and the tear-gas-scented chaos here in 1968 have already been droning on longer than a Jerry Garcia guitar solo. But the real bookend for this week's gathering is the historic Democratic convention that convened in Chicago's Exhibition Hall 100 years ago last month. The Chicago convention of 1896 laid the intellectual cornerstone for the philosophy that guided the Democratic Party through most of the 20th century.
OPINION
March 18, 2006
Re "Crashing the party," Current, March 12 Daniel Casse makes an interesting case for strong government. However, he does not follow it to the logical conclusion. He criticizes "large, inept and weak" programs from Democrats, while evidently being blind to the astounding levels of ineptitude from the current administration. He mentions President Bush's tax cuts with approval, but he never makes the connection that his "strong government" needs to be paid for and cannot be indefinitely sustained by borrowing.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Four years ago, GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin -- then a relatively obscure governor of a remote state -- made a barn-burning speech at the Republican National Convention that vastly exceeded the punditry's (admittedly low) expectations. Although things went downhill from there for Palin, it was a clutch performance that helped establish the then-governor of Alaska as a national figure. The expectations will be quite a bit higher for Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), the GOP's current nominee for vice president, when he steps up to the microphone Wednesday night.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
JANESVILLE, Wis. -- Four years ago, it might have sounded preposterous that Wisconsin, a state that preferred Barack Obama to John McCain by 14 points, would become a wellspring of successful GOP candidates and leaders. But the impossible has happened. The state features three prominent speakers during the GOP convention -- RNC Chairman Reince Priebus, Gov. Scott Walker and vice presidential hopeful Paul Ryan, who hopes to wow the nation with a speech Wednesday night. In 2008, the state's two U.S. senators were from the Democratic Party.
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