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Small Grants For Teachers Program

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NEWS
June 26, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Rose Fisher and Mary Lou Little bought lunch pails and stuffed them with kid-pleasing books and games dealing with math, science and social studies. Designed to be rotated among their kindergartners at Canterbury Avenue School in Pacoima, the materials the teachers created for their reading program include activities to involve parents as well.
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NEWS
June 26, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Rose Fisher and Mary Lou Little bought lunch pails and stuffed them with kid-pleasing books and games dealing with math, science and social studies. Designed to be rotated among their kindergartners at Canterbury Avenue School in Pacoima, the materials the teachers created for their reading program include activities to involve parents as well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1992
Author Tracy Kidder in 1989 wrote about the nine months during which he followed a fifth-grade public school teacher, watching how a good teacher drew students out, how she challenged them, how closely she listened. "Decades of research and reform have not altered the fundamental facts of teaching," he concluded. "The task of universal, public, elementary education is still usually being conducted by a woman alone in a little room."
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth Curry was first out, stumped by combustible. The 10th-grader was one of nine students competing last week in a vocabulary bee at Venice High School. Held in the cafeteria, the war of words had the structure of an old-fashioned spelling bee. Each student was asked to define one of a list of words, many of which had been part of the school's word-of-the-day program. Students who failed were eliminated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1988 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
The word last Wednesday at Venice High School was demoniac. At lunchtime, 16-year-old Christina Rounds approached Venice Principal Andrea L. Natker and said, "Her demoniac attitude caused the younger children to act poorly." It wasn't the snappiest conversation starter ever, but it won Christina a Snickers bar. She had used Venice's word of the day properly in a sentence. She had demonstrated she knew that demoniac means "influenced by a demon, like a fiend."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth Curry was first out, stumped by combustible. The 10th-grader was one of nine students competing last week in a vocabulary bee at Venice High School. Held in the cafeteria, the war of words had the structure of an old-fashioned spelling bee. Each student was asked to define one of a list of words, many of which had been part of the school's word-of-the-day program. Students who failed were eliminated.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth Curry was first out, stumped by combustible. The 10th-grader was one of nine students competing last week in a vocabulary bee at Venice High School. Held in the cafeteria, the war of words had the structure of an old-fashioned spelling bee. Each student was asked to define one of a list of words, many of which had been part of the school's word-of-the-day program. Students who failed were eliminated.
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