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NEWS
November 15, 1990 | JOHN RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tucked away up Rustic Canyon is a sordid bit of local history. Surrounded by the rugged mountainsides and overgrown by brush, the burned-out and crumbling buildings are what remains of the Murphy Ranch, where during the late 1930s a small group hoping to establish a Nazi utopia built an elaborate infrastructure that included a 395,000-gallon concrete water tank, a 20,000-gallon diesel fuel tank, and their own power station.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2014 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
Detectives are looking for witnesses in a fatal parking lot shooting of a 28-year-old man in Van Nuys , authorities said Wednesday. A small group of people were inside a restaurant in the 13640 block of Burbank Boulevard about 6:10 p.m. Monday when a dispute arose, said Los Angeles police Lt. Steve Harer. The group then walked into the parking lot and the man pulled out a gun and shot Sevada Aghazarian several times, Harer said. HOMICIDE REPORT: A story for every victim Aghazarian was taken to a hospital, where he died.
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SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday announced it intends to drop all federal protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, carving out an exception for a struggling population of Mexican wolves in New Mexico and Arizona. The announcement means that federal scientists believe that wolves in the lower 48 states are no longer threatened with extinction and don't require the protection afforded by the Endangered Species Act. Wolf packs are well established in the Great Lakes and Northern Rockies, as well as scattered populations in Oregon, Washington and Northern California, officials said.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
METAIRIE, La. - In the months before Congress passed the president's healthcare law, Sen. Mary L. Landrieu faced a deluge: The office phones rang off the hook, the mail was heavy and a few restive constituents - well aware of the cameras - showed up at her events urging her to vote against it. The three-term Louisiana Democrat was one of the final holdouts, but ultimately she backed the bill. And now in this red state - where President Obama lost by 18 percentage points in 2012 - her opponents intend to make her pay the price.
NEWS
December 18, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
The five women gathered in the living room of Ina Bliss' Irvine apartment had perused the questionnaire on ethical health care issues and were in the process of picking out items for discussion. It was the outset of a California Health Decisions-Orange County Project small-group meeting, one of dozens of such meetings being held throughout Orange County to elicit the public's opinions and concerns for future recommendations to health care providers and policy makers.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Great Republic Insurance Co. announced that it is canceling health insurance policies sold as small group plans that serve 10,000 of its 60,000 California customers. Company Vice President James O'Hanlon said in Seattle that the decision followed discussions with California insurance regulators who indicated that the company had inadequate surplus reserves to support the amount of premiums it was collecting from its policyholders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1987 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
A small group of people opposed to the irradiation of food protested Sunday outside an Albertson's supermarket in Irvine, where irradiated papayas were being sold to test consumer reaction. The papayas had been exposed to gamma rays to destroy any possible fruit fly infestation. The process has been approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration. On other food, irradiation is believed to extend shelf life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Facing a liver transplant operation that will cost at least $140,000 and possibly much more, Grayce Aul, a Canoga Park housewife, has lost her regular health insurance policy, one that would have given her nearly full coverage. All she has been able to obtain in replacement is a conversion policy that provides bare-bones coverage, including a basic $100-a-day hospital benefit and a maximum surgical benefit of a little more than $1,000.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | MARK STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The setting is Spartan: A single, unheated room in a metal industrial building shared by a grimy radiator-repair shop in a forgotten town in the middle of the woods. Do not be fooled by the modest headquarters of the Environmental Protection Information Center. The relatively small group has had an impact on California as big as its name.
SPORTS
December 8, 1988 | Bill Christine
Ever since off-track betting--the legal kind--started in New York in the 1970s, on-track attendance has suffered at the state's three major tracks--Belmont Park, Aqueduct and Saratoga. Something else has happened with the dwindling of live crowds in New York. An alarmingly small number of people is doing much of the betting. Phil Dunn, an executive at the New York tracks, talked about the situation this week at the University of Arizona's symposium on racing.
OPINION
October 4, 2013 | By Russell Korobkin
The Nobel Prize-winning game theorist Thomas Schelling wrote in his most important book, "The Strategy of Conflict," that a man who shows up on your doorstep with a knife and threatens to stab himself if you don't pay him $10 is more likely to get the money if his eyes are bloodshot. I translate this important observation to my law and business students this way: In negotiation, the crazy person wins. If your counterpart is willing to act in a way that harms both sides rather than making any concessions, you are outflanked.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook will soon begin testing VIP-only features that make it easier for celebrities to keep close tabs on social media chatter and reach out to fans from mobile devices. The features are designed to get Page Sixers to spend more time on Facebook. In other words, Facebook is looking to borrow some of that Justin Bieber magic from a popular online celebrity hangout: Twitter. With 200 million active users, Twitter does not have the heft of Facebook. But it currently reigns as the digital king of public conversations, having made it simple and snappy for celebs to monitor what social media followers are saying about them and talk back to those followers at opportune moments.
SPORTS
July 31, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
He walked into applause and still left with yet an even more appreciative audience. Mariano Rivera is a Yankee, which makes him a natural enemy to anyone who cares about the Dodgers. Yet there he was, meeting privately with approximately 20 longtime Dodgers employees before Wednesday's game, expressing his gratitude for their being there, answering questions, posing for individual photographs and handing each a signed baseball. “It's a privilege and honor to be here,” he told the small group.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The not-guilty verdict for George Zimmerman continued to stoke protests across the U.S., the latest one a sit-in at Tallahassee, Fla., on Tuesday morning, with more demonstrations expected through the week. At least several dozen protesters gathered at the state capitol to protest Florida's stand-your-ground law. It comes on the heels of three nights of sometimes violent protests in a number of cities, including Los Angeles, where 14 people were arrested on Monday. Photos from social media showed demonstrators preparing a sit-in in Florida Gov. Rick Scott's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Ruben Vives, Robert J. Lopez and Andrew Blankstein
Los Angeles police arrested 14 people overnight for failing to disperse after hundreds of protesters splintered off a peaceful demonstration in the Crenshaw district and began stomping cars and breaking windows. “It started off as a peaceful protest at Leimert Park,” said LAPD Officer Bruce Borihanh. “Unfortunately, a small group started disrupting it. It just got out of hand.” About 350  Los Angeles Police Department  officers swarmed the Crenshaw district after groups of youths broke away from the demonstration protesting the George Zimmerman murder trial verdict.
FOOD
July 12, 2013 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With thick, hollow trunks and lichen-draped limbs propped up on crutches, the century-old Gravenstein trees at Walker Apples look less like a working orchard than an arboreal infirmary, or the rear guard of a retreating army. The 20 square miles of Gravensteins that once covered the local hills are now reduced to one, and the remaining trees also would have succumbed to chain saws were it not for the matchless flavor of their fruits and the determination of a small band of farmers and preservationists.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not easy listening to the universe. For one thing, there's the problem of office space. Consider Kent Cullers, for instance. A big, paper-stuffed box labeled "Ice-Packed Sweet Corn" offers cardboard evidence of his latest office move at NASA's Ames Research Center here. Still stored away, too, is a special "camera" that allows Cullers to read on the tip of a finger--one letter at a time--projections of documents, equations and other data unavailable in Braille or via his talking computer.
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A small group of army officers made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate President Alberto Fujimori and overthrow the government early Friday, the government said. Fujimori, who suspended constitutional rule in April with the backing of the military, was forced to abandon the national palace while loyalist forces were deployed to prevent the coup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Howard Blume
A local advocacy group is pushing for teachers' raises and bonuses based on whether instructors are willing to take on difficult assignments and on whether they deliver measurable student achievement gains. The proposals are part of two policy papers that were developed by a small group of Los Angeles-area teachers under the guidance of Educators 4 Excellence, a foundation-funded group with a local branch. The group is seeking to create an alternative to the local teachers union for instructors who want to get involved in political and policy issues.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday announced it intends to drop all federal protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, carving out an exception for a struggling population of Mexican wolves in New Mexico and Arizona. The announcement means that federal scientists believe that wolves in the lower 48 states are no longer threatened with extinction and don't require the protection afforded by the Endangered Species Act. Wolf packs are well established in the Great Lakes and Northern Rockies, as well as scattered populations in Oregon, Washington and Northern California, officials said.
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