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Small House

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NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
When Joe Borst bought a run-down 1952 house in Marina del Rey, he and girlfriend Maria Torres hoped to transform the 1,200-square-foot cookie-cutter plan into something that felt larger, more open and modern - a tall order given the limited budget. The couple could afford to renovate the house but not to expand it, so the mission became to rethink the floor plan - to leave the perimeter of the house intact, adjust how the existing space was used and make the most of the house's backyard.
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OPINION
February 19, 2014 | By Jordan Stancil
My great-grandfather founded the Rialto Theater in tiny Grayling, Mich., in 1915. His handbills advertised an opening-day screening of "The Twenty-Million-Dollar Mystery" on "two good single reels. " I run the same theater today, almost 99 years later. But two good single reels aren't what they used to be. Our theater is threatened now because Hollywood movie studios are phasing out 35mm film and beginning to distribute new movies only in digital format. In December, Paramount Pictures announced that "Anchorman 2" would be its final movie printed on film, and other studios are expected to quickly follow suit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Publishing today is an industry of changing fortunes. Publishing houses create new imprints, close down others and get swallowed up by big corporations owned by mega-giants. Editors are turned loose in this down-sizing decade, changing jobs frequently. It is almost a phenomena to be an enduring small publishing house. And so the literary community plans to honor Noel Young, who 30 years ago founded the internationally recognized Capra Press in Santa Barbara.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2014 | By Andrew Khouri
The front-end loader swung to the right and took a bite out of the shingled roof of the quaint cottage. The roar of the engine and crackle of buckling lumber carried down Elm Avenue in Manhattan Beach. Within 40 minutes, a demolition crew reduced the 1950s one-story to rubble. The 782-square-foot house would be replaced by a 3,300-square-foot Cape Cod. "It feels exactly like the good old days," said the property's developer, Mike Leonard. Those days of booming demolition and construction came during last decade's housing bubble.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | JOAN DEKTAR
Warmed by the sun, cooled by breezes from the ocean and scented by chaparral, this is a true country house. It's in Malibu, set on a hillside above a stream that flows year-round, and it has a small orchard, berry bushes that are planted along a fence, a chicken coop and a big corral for goats. Dogs gambol about. It's now Gareth Davies' home as he rediscovers country life. Until about a year ago, Davies appeared to be the archetypal city person.
HOME & GARDEN
April 28, 2005 | Chris Erskine
As the father of teenagers, I like that we live in a house modest enough that I can hear them sneaking out of the bedroom window at night. That way I can get up and lock the window behind them as they leave, in case they change their sneaky little minds. "What are you doing, Dad?" they often ask. "Have a nice night," I say through the dual-pane Andersen window. Truth is, no one leaves our Alcatraz for very long.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL and H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Twelve people, including three children, were found dead Thursday inside a small house here, apparently poisoned or asphyxiated during what authorities described as a nightlong religious ceremony gone awry. Five others, including an 8-month-old baby girl, were taken to a clinic, where three were reported in comas and listed in critical condition. The oldest of the dead, according to police, was Fidel Coronel Franco, 77; the youngest was an 11-year-old girl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1991 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Moorpark fire that razed a small house and garage where 21 people lived has again raised questions about what can be done to eliminate the overcrowding of houses in the city. "It's a frustrating situation," Moorpark Mayor Paul Lawrason said. "Affordable housing is the solution. But it's a long-term solution."
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Marissa Gluck
It's unlikely that residents of Mount Washington ever envisioned a metal-clad trapezoid sitting on this bend of Cazador Street, but the design - dubbed the Big and Small House by its architect, Simon Storey - is full of surprises. The home sits on a lot once considered unbuildable because of its steep grade and diminutive size - at 2,500 square feet, about half the typical L.A. lot. Inside, however, the 900-square-foot house feels large and airy despite those space constraints. Owners Joyce Campbell and Jon Behar met Storey a decade ago, when he was a graduate student at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and hired him to remodel their Mount Washington house.
HOME & GARDEN
June 5, 1999 | KATHY BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's no wonder that Michelle and Robin Bentler love their home in Santa Ana's Floral Park neighborhood. It's as close to Mayberry, U.S.A., as they could get without sound-stage backdrops. Somehow you expect to see Opie coming down the street whistling with a fishing pole over his shoulder. "We moved here over two years ago because we love the sense of community," says Michelle Bentler.
TRAVEL
September 15, 2013 | By Catherine Watson
Scratch Brittany, scratch the Cotswolds: The prettiest place I've ever been, anywhere in the world, is Galena, Ill. It's also the only place on the planet where I feel truly at home. More than 40 years ago, I fell in love with Galena for its history and architecture, which in this old river town are practically the same thing. Ulysses S. Grant, for example, lived here twice - in a small house before the Civil War and a grander one when he came home from winning it. Both Grant houses still stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Barefoot Books is a small house based in Cambridge, Mass., that publishes children's book. As of this week, you can call it “The Mouse that Roared.” The people who run Barefoot Books are frustrated with the business practices of Amazon, the massive Seattle-based online retailer. So this week, Barefoot Books finally said: Amazon, we want to break up with you. “The challenges we have faced doing business with Amazon over the years are similar to those we experienced selling to the big box retail chains,” Barefoot Books' co-founder and CEO Nancy Traversy said in a news release . “Personal relationships with buyers are rare, particularly when you're a small publisher.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Marissa Gluck
It's unlikely that residents of Mount Washington ever envisioned a metal-clad trapezoid sitting on this bend of Cazador Street, but the design - dubbed the Big and Small House by its architect, Simon Storey - is full of surprises. The home sits on a lot once considered unbuildable because of its steep grade and diminutive size - at 2,500 square feet, about half the typical L.A. lot. Inside, however, the 900-square-foot house feels large and airy despite those space constraints. Owners Joyce Campbell and Jon Behar met Storey a decade ago, when he was a graduate student at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and hired him to remodel their Mount Washington house.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Craig Ehrlich didn't particularly want a modern house. But everything he valued - light, air, indoor-outdoor living, sustainable building materials - has led to this: a recently completed 1,150-square-foot house in Santa Monica that feels much larger thanks to its modern sculptural design. With its exterior wood screens and expanses of glass, the house is immediately intriguing, but the interior elements - the geometric cutouts in the architecture and the dynamic double-height spaces - are what make the small house feel substantial.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
When Joe Borst bought a run-down 1952 house in Marina del Rey, he and girlfriend Maria Torres hoped to transform the 1,200-square-foot cookie-cutter plan into something that felt larger, more open and modern - a tall order given the limited budget. The couple could afford to renovate the house but not to expand it, so the mission became to rethink the floor plan - to leave the perimeter of the house intact, adjust how the existing space was used and make the most of the house's backyard.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | Greg Goldin, Goldin is the architecture critic at Los Angeles Magazine.
Arts & Architecture, which folded 41 years ago, is the most influential architecture magazine ever published. During the height of its run, from 1945 to 1967, it convinced the world that Los Angeles was at the vanguard of reinventing the single family home. John Entenza, the editor, quietly featured the work of Isamu Noguchi, Henry Moore, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Eero Saarinen, Richard Neutra, George Nelson, Charles Eames, George Nakashima and Bernard Rudofsky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1997 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the clarity of hindsight, it is easy to see that Kathleen Kenny blew it when she fashioned the little red house out of a dilapidated chicken coop--without taking out a building permit. In the five years since the transgression came to light, she has been in a war of attrition with the county and state, losing at almost every turn.
HOME & GARDEN
June 19, 2008
Maltman bungalow: The main headline on the Letters column in the June 12 Home section called the letter writer's home a condo. It is a small house.
HOME & GARDEN
June 5, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
NEAR THE END of 2005, when home prices in Southern California seemed to top themselves by the week, a property whose best days seemed long past appeared on the market in Silver Lake. Located on a hilly stretch of Maltman Avenue, just south of Sunset Boulevard, it consisted of 17 small bungalows, built in 1926 in a boxy, abstracted Spanish style and lined up along a narrow driveway. The bungalows, all rentals, had some obvious charm. With red-tile parapets and tiny front stoops, they were a reminder that Los Angeles was once quite good at producing housing that combined moderate density, a sense of community and quick access to the city at large.
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