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NEWS
January 2, 1989 | Associated Press
A 14-month-old Florida boy who received a liver and small intestine in an experimental transplant was doing well Sunday and may be moved out of intensive care soon, doctors said. Calvin Oliveira was in critical but stable condition at University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics after undergoing the double transplant Saturday. Calvin suffered from short bowel syndrome, a rare disorder that left only 5% of his small intestine functional.
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NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A new breed of powerful magnets found in toys and jewelry poses a growing and potentially deadly risk to small children who swallow them, according to a study published Monday in the Canadian Medical Assn. Journal. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets are created from rare-earth elements and are 10 to 20 times stronger than traditional ferrite magnets. Developed in the 1980s, the magnets are often found in novelty desk toys, children's construction sets and jewelry clasps. Years ago, when a child swallowed a weaker magnet, parents and physicians could usually rely on the object passing through the patient's digestive system.
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NEWS
November 5, 1987
Three-year-old Tabatha Foster began to breathe on her own without a respirator and passed a critical 72-hour mark following her landmark five-organ transplant in Pittsburgh, Pa. But doctors warned that the Madisonville, Ky., toddler was not yet "out of the woods." Tabatha's condition was upgraded from critical to critical but stable, Children's Hospital spokeswoman Lynn McMahon said.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
ESPN anchor Stuart Scott announced on Twitter on Monday night that he is battling cancer for the third time. "Blessed by prayers..I'm back in the Fight. C reared its head again. Chemo evry 2 wks but I'll still work, still work out..still #LIVESTRONG" Scott was first diagnosed with the disease in 2007 when doctors discovered he had cancer of the appendix while performing an appendectomy. He underwent chemotherapy and all was well until 2011, when he revealed that doctors found tumors in his small intestine.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | Associated Press
A man suffering from colon cancer received $400,000 in a lawsuit settlement with a doctor who left a towel in his abdomen when he stitched the man up after surgery. William R. Miller Jr., 70, complained of pain after the operation at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in 1999. Doctors waited 73 days before they operated and found the towel wrapped around his small intestine. Ben Martin, a Dallas lawyer representing Miller, said the $400,000 settlement against Dr.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A new breed of powerful magnets found in toys and jewelry poses a growing and potentially deadly risk to small children who swallow them, according to a study published Monday in the Canadian Medical Assn. Journal. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets are created from rare-earth elements and are 10 to 20 times stronger than traditional ferrite magnets. Developed in the 1980s, the magnets are often found in novelty desk toys, children's construction sets and jewelry clasps. Years ago, when a child swallowed a weaker magnet, parents and physicians could usually rely on the object passing through the patient's digestive system.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
A 3-year-old girl received a transplanted liver and small intestine today in a rare operation that lasted nearly 14 hours. Tracey Kay Gonzales of Corpus Christi, Tex., was in critical condition and breathing with the help of a respirator in the intensive care unit at Children's Hospital following the surgery, said hospital spokeswoman Sue Cardillo. The operation began at 5:25 p.m. Monday and ended at about 7:10 a.m. today. "Everybody seems to feel it went fairly well," Cardillo said.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
ESPN anchor Stuart Scott announced on Twitter on Monday night that he is battling cancer for the third time. "Blessed by prayers..I'm back in the Fight. C reared its head again. Chemo evry 2 wks but I'll still work, still work out..still #LIVESTRONG" Scott was first diagnosed with the disease in 2007 when doctors discovered he had cancer of the appendix while performing an appendectomy. He underwent chemotherapy and all was well until 2011, when he revealed that doctors found tumors in his small intestine.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Twenty years from now, 2 out of 5 Americans will be obese, according to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. For many of these people, dieting and exercise will not be enough to help them lose weight. They may need bariatric surgery. And if you wind up being one of them, your best bet is to go to a hospital that performs a high volume of bariatric surgeries, according to a new study from Healthgrades, an independent healthcare ratings company based in Denver. Bariatric surgery alters digestion to both increase metabolism and lower blood sugar levels.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
For patients who are obese and have Type 2 diabetes, gastric bypass can be a remarkable cure: After such surgery, more than three-quarters of such patients can significantly reduce or discontinue their diabetes drugs within a year, studies show. With that in mind, diabetes and obesity specialists meeting this week in New York City returned again and again to a central question: how to deliver benefits of bariatric surgery without the risks of major surgery? One proposal: a 2-foot gastrointestinal "sleeve" that can be implanted through the mouth and that lines a small part of the small intestine , just below the stomach.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Twenty years from now, 2 out of 5 Americans will be obese, according to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. For many of these people, dieting and exercise will not be enough to help them lose weight. They may need bariatric surgery. And if you wind up being one of them, your best bet is to go to a hospital that performs a high volume of bariatric surgeries, according to a new study from Healthgrades, an independent healthcare ratings company based in Denver. Bariatric surgery alters digestion to both increase metabolism and lower blood sugar levels.
SCIENCE
July 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Everyone who has ever painted knows that bristles can fall off the paint brush and mar your new surface. It probably should not be a great surprise, then, that bristles can come off a wire brush used for cleaning an outdoor grill, get taken up by food and ingested. Once in the throat or intestines, the bristles can cause serious damage, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned this week in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. A team of physicians from Brown University's Alpert School of Medicine reported that they had observed six cases of such injury between March 2011 and June 2012.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
For patients who are obese and have Type 2 diabetes, gastric bypass can be a remarkable cure: After such surgery, more than three-quarters of such patients can significantly reduce or discontinue their diabetes drugs within a year, studies show. With that in mind, diabetes and obesity specialists meeting this week in New York City returned again and again to a central question: how to deliver benefits of bariatric surgery without the risks of major surgery? One proposal: a 2-foot gastrointestinal "sleeve" that can be implanted through the mouth and that lines a small part of the small intestine , just below the stomach.
HEALTH
January 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A two-week treatment with an antibiotic can ease overall symptoms in many patients with irritable bowel syndrome for at least 10 weeks and perhaps for much longer, according to a pair of clinical trials of more than 1,200 patients reported Wednesday. The proportion of patients who benefited ? about 11% ? was modest, but the fact that any at all were helped validated the idea that intestinal bacteria play a role in the onset of irritable bowel syndrome, commonly known as IBS, said Dr. Mark Pimentel of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, who led the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | Associated Press
A man suffering from colon cancer received $400,000 in a lawsuit settlement with a doctor who left a towel in his abdomen when he stitched the man up after surgery. William R. Miller Jr., 70, complained of pain after the operation at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in 1999. Doctors waited 73 days before they operated and found the towel wrapped around his small intestine. Ben Martin, a Dallas lawyer representing Miller, said the $400,000 settlement against Dr.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | AMY GEIER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An emergency medical technician guides a patient to a scale and shouts, "Two thousand one hundred and thirty-five pounds!" Part hospital, part barn, the large-animal clinic of Ohio State University Veterinary Hospital is a place where everything's bigger--the needles, the gurneys, the medical challenges. For horses, cows, bulls, goats, llamas and alpacas, the clinic is the 24-hour ER for pets and farm animals.
HEALTH
January 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A two-week treatment with an antibiotic can ease overall symptoms in many patients with irritable bowel syndrome for at least 10 weeks and perhaps for much longer, according to a pair of clinical trials of more than 1,200 patients reported Wednesday. The proportion of patients who benefited ? about 11% ? was modest, but the fact that any at all were helped validated the idea that intestinal bacteria play a role in the onset of irritable bowel syndrome, commonly known as IBS, said Dr. Mark Pimentel of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, who led the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
A 3-year-old girl received a transplanted liver and small intestine today in a rare operation that lasted nearly 14 hours. Tracey Kay Gonzales of Corpus Christi, Tex., was in critical condition and breathing with the help of a respirator in the intensive care unit at Children's Hospital following the surgery, said hospital spokeswoman Sue Cardillo. The operation began at 5:25 p.m. Monday and ended at about 7:10 a.m. today. "Everybody seems to feel it went fairly well," Cardillo said.
NEWS
January 2, 1989 | Associated Press
A 14-month-old Florida boy who received a liver and small intestine in an experimental transplant was doing well Sunday and may be moved out of intensive care soon, doctors said. Calvin Oliveira was in critical but stable condition at University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics after undergoing the double transplant Saturday. Calvin suffered from short bowel syndrome, a rare disorder that left only 5% of his small intestine functional.
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