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Small Pox

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NEWS
April 23, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision certain to provoke controversy within the world public health community, the Clinton administration on Thursday announced that the United States will retain its sample of smallpox virus, one of the only two known remaining in the world, the other being in Russia. President Clinton, defying the World Health Organization, decided to preserve the stock in case scientists need to develop new vaccines against a possible bio-terrorist attack.
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NEWS
April 23, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision certain to provoke controversy within the world public health community, the Clinton administration on Thursday announced that the United States will retain its sample of smallpox virus, one of the only two known remaining in the world, the other being in Russia. President Clinton, defying the World Health Organization, decided to preserve the stock in case scientists need to develop new vaccines against a possible bio-terrorist attack.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990
While nations turn away from the discredited philosophy of communism, having realized that it is based on wasteful and undemocratic notions, Charles Birch (Op-Ed Page, March 7) calls out for a global resurgence. He decries the fact that some people and nations are rich while others are poor, laying all of the blame for the world's ills on the wealthy. Almost every major blessing of modern life has been brought to the world be "the rich." Polio, small pox and the bubonic plague were defeated by the rich.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian on Thursday unveiled a $5-million, seven-point "children's initiative" to improve the health and safety of young people and then accused his Democratic rival of supporting a "big-brother scheme to take kids out of their homes and send them to state institutions." But Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, Deukmejian's opponent, said he never made any such proposal and said the Republican governor "obviously doesn't know how to tell the truth."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2002 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County government expects a $1-million infusion of federal aid to help public health officials do a better job of detecting and responding to bioterrorism threats. Public Health Department officials have already received $200,000 and anticipate an additional $830,000 in coming weeks, Paul Lorenz, the department's director, said Friday. The first chunk of money will be used to hire two new county employees--an administrator and a physician--who will coordinate efforts to fight bioterrorism.
BOOKS
April 3, 1988 | David Harrison, Harrison is the author of "The White Tribe of Africa: South Africa in Perspective" (University of California Press). and
This is an insider's story, full of insider's insights into 300 years of Afrikaner history. The bare bones are not unfamiliar--how the search for security and fulfillment of one group in South Africa has led to the domination of all the others. But into the tragedy of the development of apartheid, Marq de Villiers has woven the experience of eight generations of his own family. It's a device that gives his book a unique perspective.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | Richard Crawford, Richard Crawford is archivist for the San Diego Historical Society.
We are all badly scared by the smallpox. We keep a sentinel posted to give notice of the approach of anyone and we have to know about them before they can come nearer to the corral.... Many have done the same thing. I have stopped my vaqueros in their rounds.... --Cave Johnson Couts, San Luis Rey, 1862 For much of the 19th Century, the scourge of smallpox frightened frontier communities in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After the boy's searing fever came back a fifth time, his mother was frantic and the physicians were puzzled. UC Irvine infectious-disease expert Dr. Alan Barbour was called in and quickly recognized the boy's ailment as relapsing fever. The culprit was a tick. "Relapsing fever is becoming more and more common. It's carried by a special kind of tick that lives around mountain cabins.
OPINION
March 8, 1998 | Leonard A. Cole, Leonard A. Cole teaches political science at Rutgers University-Newark, and is author of "The 11th Plague: The Politics of Biological and Chemical Warfare."
The Pentagon's recent decision to vaccinate every member of the armed forces against anthrax may have come too quickly. One study just reported by the National Academy of Sciences questions the vaccine's effectiveness against varied strains of the bacteria. Another suggests Russian scientists have already genetically engineered a strain that resists the available vaccine. And there are other concerns as well.
BOOKS
May 26, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
SUMMERHOUSE, LATER Stories By Judith Hermann Translated from the German by Margot Bettauer Dembo Ecco: 224 pp., $22.95 Linked stories can be a powerful form. Done well, they are filled with echoes: gestures that appear story to story, smells and words, not to mention names and connections between the characters. They can reflect the tendrils of memory that grow into the present, facts and items of earlier moments that reappear throughout a lifetime.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Physicians have fought viruses with vaccination since Edward Jenner inoculated a young milkmaid against smallpox in 1796 (the word vaccination, in fact, comes from the Latin vaccinae , meaning small pox ) . But no one ever examined a virus visually until the invention of the electron microscope in 1939.
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