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February 7, 1988 | JACK SMITH
WE ALMOST won a Mercedes-Benz. Well, not almost , maybe, but we had a chance: one chance in 100,000. My wife filled out a coupon when we went to the Luxury Lifestyle show at the L.A. Convention Center. A week or so later, she got a phone call. She was excited. She said a young woman had told her that we were one of six finalists. In a few days we would be receiving our number under a seal. We had to drive down to Oceanside to peel off the seal and receive our prize.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Ever squinted to read the directions on a medicine bottle but couldn't make out the small print? California lawmakers have the prescription to solve that problem. The state Senate has approved legislation requiring pharmacists to print specific, important information on prescription labels in at least 12-point type. The bill was the idea of Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-East Bay), who cited a survey by the state Board of Pharmacy that found 60% of people want larger or bolder print on prescription labels.
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TRAVEL
July 25, 1993
I would like to alert shoppers traveling to the Republic of Ireland to a nuance in retrieving VATs (value added taxes). The forms were available everywhere I shopped on my recent trip. I saved all receipts, filling out a form for each shop visited. In small print on the forms, it mentioned a service charge. What it did not spell out is that the charge is for each receipt. After all was totaled at Shannon Airport, I was handed about $3. Had I known, I would have done more shopping at fewer places.
NEWS
August 18, 2012 | By Judi Dash
Small print? Dark restaurant lighting? No problem. The PageBrite, a 7-by-5 1/2 -inch, 3X magnifier with four built-in LED lights, is ideal for zooming in on books, maps and menus. The featherweight magnifier/light has an integrated stand/book clip, and can double as a bookmark. I found it useful for reading minuscule print on cellphones, and for a larger-than-life look at pretty much anything at hand. It costs $12.49. Info: www.asseenontv.com.
NEWS
August 18, 2012 | By Judi Dash
Small print? Dark restaurant lighting? No problem. The PageBrite, a 7-by-5 1/2 -inch, 3X magnifier with four built-in LED lights, is ideal for zooming in on books, maps and menus. The featherweight magnifier/light has an integrated stand/book clip, and can double as a bookmark. I found it useful for reading minuscule print on cellphones, and for a larger-than-life look at pretty much anything at hand. It costs $12.49. Info: www.asseenontv.com.
HEALTH
July 21, 2008
In regard to your two July 14 articles [“For Kids, Statins Are but One Path” and “For Some, Statins Are the Best Remedy”]: Before we start shoveling statins down the throats of our kids, I'd like to point out a very serious side effect that I suffered at two different times from two different statins. I'm a 58-year-old male. I was taking statins to reduce my cholesterol (which worked). After a few months on statins, I became wildly depressed and suicidal (not my normal sunny nature)
BUSINESS
January 28, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny print carrying the bad news in ads--virtually hidden at the bottom of the TV screen or page--was a favorite marketing ploy used by many of the nation's top advertisers last year. That is the conclusion of the consumer advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest, which handed out its ninth annual "Lemon Awards" on Thursday for "Worst Ads of 1993." The group said ads carrying tiny print ranked among the most misleading and irresponsible of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Ever squinted to read the directions on a medicine bottle but couldn't make out the small print? California lawmakers have the prescription to solve that problem. The state Senate has approved legislation requiring pharmacists to print specific, important information on prescription labels in at least 12-point type. The bill was the idea of Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-East Bay), who cited a survey by the state Board of Pharmacy that found 60% of people want larger or bolder print on prescription labels.
SPORTS
June 11, 2003 | Mike Hiserman
Players from Weber State's national champion baseball team are begging for cash -- with no risk of being sanctioned by the NCAA. That's because the players belong to a club team that recently won the National Club Assn. World Series. Each team member paid $600 just to play, and when the Wildcats needed $13,000 more to play in the national tournament, they took a loan from the school. But now, having won the title with a 4-0 victory over a club from Texas A&M, their work is still not done.
NEWS
January 13, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Like most other Republicans in his Leisure World Laguna Hills community, Kent Merrill endorsed the GOP-inspired "contract with America." Speaker Newt Gingrich and other Republicans held up the pact as a promise to reform government, and the 75-year-old voter thought the change was long overdue. Among other things, he liked something called "common sense legal reforms"--the ninth item in the 10-point legislative package.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2009 | Hugo Martin
Although Southern California still enjoys shorts and T-shirt weather, airlines have already started to roll out discount fares for Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's travel. This is great news for bargain-hunting travelers, but it signals growing desperation among U.S. airlines, which have seen revenues drop 21% in July versus the same month last year, according to the Air Transport Assn. of America, the industry trade group that represents most passenger airlines in the country.
HEALTH
July 21, 2008
In regard to your two July 14 articles [“For Kids, Statins Are but One Path” and “For Some, Statins Are the Best Remedy”]: Before we start shoveling statins down the throats of our kids, I'd like to point out a very serious side effect that I suffered at two different times from two different statins. I'm a 58-year-old male. I was taking statins to reduce my cholesterol (which worked). After a few months on statins, I became wildly depressed and suicidal (not my normal sunny nature)
SPORTS
June 11, 2003 | Mike Hiserman
Players from Weber State's national champion baseball team are begging for cash -- with no risk of being sanctioned by the NCAA. That's because the players belong to a club team that recently won the National Club Assn. World Series. Each team member paid $600 just to play, and when the Wildcats needed $13,000 more to play in the national tournament, they took a loan from the school. But now, having won the title with a 4-0 victory over a club from Texas A&M, their work is still not done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2000 | NANCY KINSEY NEEDHAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before prom tickets go on sale or spring wedding invitations go out in the mail, it's a good idea to reserve the limousine. Spring will be here before you know it, and all the best limousines could be taken. Even if there isn't a prom or wedding in your future, it's possible that those popular events could conflict with an upcoming wedding anniversary or child's birthday party, in which limousine service could be in order. Yes, you read that right.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1999
Is Jackson Browne really skipping the chance to play in his hometown this week--or is he just a great pretender? Browne is on tour with an all-star band of singer-songwriters that includes Bonnie Raitt, Shawn Colvin and Bruce Hornsby, and the ensemble will hit the stage of the Greek Theatre on Tuesday night.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senators were shouting. Senators were waving their arms. Yet the casual listener to the floor debate on giving more leverage to patients in dealing with their managed health-care plans could get the impression that the two parties are extremely close. Lawmakers are due to finish work on the bill today. On Wednesday, each side promised to protect women from being forced out of the hospital within a day of having a mastectomy. They both pledged more access to emergency rooms.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1987 | S. J. DIAMOND
New York, $119. Washington, $147. Miami, $129. That's some of the big print, bold-face type in a recent big newspaper ad run by TWA. In small print, at the bottom, are all the "fare conditions" that make it hard to get such fares, including this note: "Most fares are non-refundable" and subject to "cancellation/change of date/itinerary penalties." Translation: Travelers who change or cancel their flights will pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1997
Regarding the violence that is a "sad fact of life" in Little League baseball ("When Big People Ruin the Little Leaguers' Fun," May 8), here is a less well-known fact of life: Little League baseball has thoughtfully shielded the person whose behavior injures a child from any liability for his actions. Under the guise of a "medical release form" for emergency care, Little League Baseball Inc. required that the child's parents both become participants in the league by volunteering either their time or a minimum of $250.
TRAVEL
May 30, 1999 | SUSAN SPANO
Here are some common restrictions for special Web-only airline fares: * Most must be booked online and are ticketed electronically. Payment is by credit card only. * Specials are usually posted on the Wednesday before the weekend they're good for. Tickets must be purchased by Friday. Departures are for Friday or Saturday and returns for Sunday, Monday or Tuesday. (International flights sometimes give you more latitude in scheduling, and you don't always have to book online.
TRAVEL
August 23, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Is it good news or bad news if your favorite airline is tying its frequent-flier program to somebody else's frequent-flier program? The answer, experts say, is both. Everybody has a different opinion about whether this sudden epidemic of proposed and completed airline alliances--Delta and United, American and US Airways, Northwest and Continental--means easier trips for mile collectors in the near future or a dangerous relaxation of competition or both.
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