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NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Michael Memoli
ATHENS, Ohio - If you want an example of how Joe Biden can campaign in a way that his running mate cannot, look no further than his opening remarks at a campaign stop here Saturday. “The last time I was here … I didn't get arrested, but I almost did,” the vice president said to a jovial crowd at a jam-packed community center. He was referring to the time in 1963 when, as a member of the University of Delaware football team, he came to the campus of Ohio University for a game.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
The city administrator who ruled the city of Bell during an era of widespread corruption was sentenced Monday to 33 months behind bars for tax fraud, the first of two prison terms he is expected to be handed this week. On Wednesday, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge is expected to add years more to Robert Rizzo's punishment for plundering the small town's treasury. When Rizzo pleaded no contest in October to 69 corruption-related charges, Judge Kathleen Kennedy said she would sentence Rizzo to 10 to 12 years in prison, a term he would be allowed to serve concurrently with his federal sentence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | Liesl Bradner
When art historian Kevin Bruce was at Stanford University working on his master's thesis about muralist John Pugh, he became particularly intrigued by Pugh's 1981 trompe l'oeil work "Academe." Painted on the side of Taylor Hall at Chico State University while Pugh was a senior there, the photo-realistic work depicts a wall crumbling to reveal perfect Greek columns -- a comment on the roots of the educational system.
SPORTS
April 13, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
AUGUSTA, Ga. - The winner didn't raise his fists to the sky, he dropped his head to his knees. The winner didn't shout to the heavens, he wept into the shoulder of his wife. The winner didn't play precision golf or careful golf or even anything that can be remotely described as textbook golf. Run a lint brush over those green jackets, put some storm windows on Butler Cabin, the Masters has once again been won with Bubba Golf. Or, in the joyous, Southern-twanged tones of thousands who lined the 18th fairway at Augusta National early Sunday evening, Bub-baaaa!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
It feels like the end times are coming to little Brewster, R.I., one of those anonymous towns that used to have an economic purpose - fishing, quarry mining, farming, textiles - but now pretty much just holds beds for commuters who work in other places. First, a newborn baby disappears from its crib in the local hospital, replaced by a large yellow snake. Then a stranger in town is stabbed and scalped in his car out by the Great Swamp, the site of historical atrocities during the Colonial era and local legends ever since.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Jeff VanderMeer
The town of Wink, N.M., doesn't appear on any official map, the moon as seen from its streets has a pinkish hue, and very odd things lurk beneath the charm of its old-fashioned façade. The exact nature of those lurking things, human and otherwise, is chronicled by Shirley Jackson Award winner Robert Jackson Bennett in his at times horrifying and yet strangely beautiful new novel "American Elsewhere. " The book remains ambiguous about whether we're reading supernatural fiction, science fiction, or fantasy for a long time but then delivers mind-blowing answers.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
The tornado that destroyed Hackleburg attacked the little town's first line of defense. It leveled the town's tiny police station and crushed the police cruiser of Officer Jeremy Marbutt, who emerged unscathed after taking cover in the old town jail, built of steel and concrete. It destroyed the fire station and blew away the roof of the town hall, where 69-year-old Mayor Douglas Gunnin survived to continue serving the town's 1,500 constituents. Photo gallery: Tornadoes cut path of devastation Then it flattened the Piggy Wiggly, the only grocery store, but spared manager Dennis Whitfield, who hid under a produce rack.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | Lynne Heffley
Children's theater -- and nary a little pig or fairy princess in sight. When the nonprofit Silverlake Children's Theatre Group puts on a show, big issues in comic trappings are the order of the day. Past shows have tackled the Iraq invasion and stressed-out teens. Life, death and art are themes in an upcoming show, "The Window," slated as part of L.A.'s 2005 Edge of the World Theater Festival in the fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1990 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
At this week's Town Hall meeting, concerns that Brea's small-town atmosphere was under siege overshadowed discussions about the city's traffic, noise and glut of office space. Speaker after speaker and caller after caller, the later watching at home on Brea's cable TV channel, addressed the City Council about what they considered to be the adverse impacts of the city's ambitious redevelopment plan.
SPORTS
July 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
The donations came from all over town, ranging from $10 to $2,500. Everyone, it seemed, wanted the local Coastal Plain League team to stay in Edenton. And that's just what happened. "It was pretty amazing," said Katy Ebersole, who owns a restaurant in town with her husband. The CPL, a summertime collection of college players with 14 teams in the Carolinas and Virginia, put a team in this small town in 1998, then started looking for a buyer two years later.
OPINION
April 2, 2014 | By David C. Williams
Drive through the dilapidated main strip in Terry, Miss., and it's easy to see that the town of 1,063 is a hardscrabble place. And last month, life there got harder when the last bank branch in town closed, leaving in the lurch residents who have long depended on it as a convenient place to manage their money. The same thing is happening in countless other small towns and inner-city neighborhoods across the country, which have been left behind as banks adjust to new financial realities by shuttering branches by the thousands.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Hundreds of people were being evacuated from Plymouth, Wash.,  a small town in southern Washington after an explosion and fire Monday morning at a natural gas processing facility left at least four people injured, according to the local sheriff. The blast, which brought reports of a fireball at least 30 feet high, happened around 8:20 a.m. at a facility owned by Williams, a Tulsa, Okla.-based energy company, Benton County Sheriff Steve Keane told the Los Angeles Times. At least one of those injured was a worker, said Keane, who didn't have information on the victims' conditions.
OPINION
February 23, 2014
Re "Save the small town cinema," Opinion, Feb. 19 Jordan Stancil's article on his family's theater in Grayling, Mich., brought back memories of the Palace Theater in Clearwater, Neb., population 400, in the 1940s. My parents were farmers who made the drive to town Wednesday and Saturday nights to buy groceries and socialize. My sister and I made a beeline to the theater, where we saw two first-run movies every week. Margaret O'Brien, Esther Williams and even Lassie became part of our childhood experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Angels in Stardust" is a creaky coming-of-age fantasy-drama whose luminous lead actress, A.J. Michalka ("Grace Unplugged"), has hopefully seen the last of this kind of ungainly corn pone. Writer-director William Robert Carey may channel bits from such classics as "The Purple Rose of Cairo" and "The Last Picture Show" to tell this Dust Bowl tale of teen dreams, trailer trash, cowboys and, yes, Indians (or as the film's hugely retrograde approach to Native Americans would have it, "Injuns")
OPINION
February 19, 2014 | By Jordan Stancil
My great-grandfather founded the Rialto Theater in tiny Grayling, Mich., in 1915. His handbills advertised an opening-day screening of "The Twenty-Million-Dollar Mystery" on "two good single reels. " I run the same theater today, almost 99 years later. But two good single reels aren't what they used to be. Our theater is threatened now because Hollywood movie studios are phasing out 35mm film and beginning to distribute new movies only in digital format. In December, Paramount Pictures announced that "Anchorman 2" would be its final movie printed on film, and other studios are expected to quickly follow suit.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
COLUMBUS, N.M. - Each morning, embattled Mayor Nicole Lawson performs a private ritual in this tiny U.S.-Mexico border village of 1,600 isolated souls, a forgotten place with mostly unpaved roads and not a single stoplight. After brushing her teeth, she pads over to a white note board bearing only an oversize number scrawled in black. On this mid-January morning, she wipes away the "58," replacing it with "57. " With a sigh of satisfaction, Lawson, 39, counts down yet another difficult day until the end of her term running a hamlet that may be one of America's most dysfunctional communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2002 | From Associated Press
MTV, known for "The Real World" series, is ready to turn its cameras on small town, USA. Producers of a new reality series, tentatively titled "Sex in the Itty Bitty City," will hold auditions in Columbus, Miss., on Jan. 7; Hope, Ark., on Jan. 9; and Opelousas, La., on Jan. 11. The documentary-style show will feature women 18 to 30 years old who are looking for a husband. It is scheduled to air in late April.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2001 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe it's all those reruns of "It's a Wonderful Life" on TV, but there's something small-town-ish about the holidays. Ice skating. Parties. Wrapping packages. It's all so quaint. And yet, right in the middle of that classic film is George Bailey hollering, "I'm shaking the dust of this crummy little town off my feet and I'm going to see the world!" George Bailey, like the rest of us, has a complicated relationship with our small towns. So charming. So confining.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Barely a month ago, Christopher Pengra became mayor of a bedroom community outside Salt Lake City, anticipating the usual headaches of a fast-growing area, such humdrum fare as traffic congestion and zoning disputes. But there was nothing in his newcomer's manual to handle this: A Utah County sheriff's deputy was killed late last month, gunned down on a lonely rural highway in Eagle Mountain after stopping to assist a stranded motorist. Sgt. Cory Wride, 44, a father of five whom friends knew as a "shy cowboy," had served the town for two decades.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
When Elijah Stewart arrived at Westchester High as a sophomore from DeRidder, La., population 10,578, the junior varsity basketball coach, Dewitt Cotton, started calling him "Texas. " "That was the first thing that came out of my mouth, because he was from the South," Cotton said. Stewart, an unassuming, polite, 6-foot-4 senior who lived in Cajun country most of his life, simply went with the flow. "The story is they didn't think I was going to last in the program," Stewart said.
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