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BUSINESS
August 18, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
New York members of the Screen Actors Guild national board issued a sharp rebuke of their own leaders Sunday, demanding that they seek help from a federal mediator if contract talks don't progress by Aug. 25. The unusual criticism was the latest sign of infighting between the Hollywood and New York factions on SAG's 71-member national board. The New York group, which holds 14 seats on the board, blasted SAG leaders for "failing to bargain realistically" with the studios. "Nothing is happening, and we're no closer to a deal today than we were six weeks ago," the New York members said in a statement, contradicting assertions by SAG Executive Director Doug Allen and President Alan Rosenberg that contract discussions with the studios were ongoing.
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BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Ed Asner and Valerie Harper are teaming up on a new project: an attempt to take down the proposed merger of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. Asner and Harper, who starred in the 1970s "Mary Tyler Moore" TV series, have joined other high-profile actors including Ed Harris and Martin Sheen in filing a lawsuit in federal court in Los Angeles on Wednesday seeking an injunction to stop SAG from holding a vote on a proposed merger with AFTRA.
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OPINION
December 8, 2008
It came as no surprise that a federal mediator failed to end the stalemate between Hollywood studios and the industry's largest actors union, the Screen Actors Guild. The predictability of the outcome, though, doesn't make it less disappointing. The lingering discord, which has slowed or even sidelined some projects, is bad for everyone -- especially the workers and companies whose livelihoods depend on film and TV production but who don't have a seat at the negotiating table.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2009 | Richard Verrier
The Screen Actors Guild board of directors has appointed David P. White as the national executive director and chief negotiator for Hollywood's largest union. The appointment of White, who had been serving as interim executive director, was widely anticipated after a group of moderate actors that orchestrated the firing of his predecessor, Doug Allen, installed White in January. The moderates recently solidified their position on the national board when their candidate, veteran character actor Ken Howard, soundly defeated Anne-Marie Johnson, who was backed by the faction that had supported Allen and swept outgoing SAG President Alan Rosenberg into office four years ago. Johnson and Rosenberg filed an unsuccessful lawsuit to block the board's firing of Allen, who led the union during a yearlong contract standoff with the studios.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2009 | Richard Verrier
The Screen Actors Guild board of directors has appointed David P. White as the national executive director and chief negotiator for Hollywood's largest union. The appointment of White, who had been serving as interim executive director, was widely anticipated after a group of moderate actors that orchestrated the firing of his predecessor, Doug Allen, installed White in January. The moderates recently solidified their position on the national board when their candidate, veteran character actor Ken Howard, soundly defeated Anne-Marie Johnson, who was backed by the faction that had supported Allen and swept outgoing SAG President Alan Rosenberg into office four years ago. Johnson and Rosenberg filed an unsuccessful lawsuit to block the board's firing of Allen, who led the union during a yearlong contract standoff with the studios.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Ed Asner and Valerie Harper are teaming up on a new project: an attempt to take down the proposed merger of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. Asner and Harper, who starred in the 1970s "Mary Tyler Moore" TV series, have joined other high-profile actors including Ed Harris and Martin Sheen in filing a lawsuit in federal court in Los Angeles on Wednesday seeking an injunction to stop SAG from holding a vote on a proposed merger with AFTRA.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2008 | Richard Verrier and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
One of the industry's biggest movie stars Thursday called on leaders of both actors unions to end a fierce and increasingly ugly feud that has put Hollywood on edge. George Clooney stopped short of denouncing leaders of the Screen Actors Guild, but he did indirectly question a campaign the union was waging to defeat an agreement negotiated by the smaller actors union, the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists.
OPINION
August 26, 2008
The entertainment industry is reputed to be recession-proof, but in the current downturn even Hollywood isn't firing on all cylinders. It's still mired in the labor turmoil that began when the Writers Guild of America walked out in November. Although that strike ended in February, the studios have yet to reach agreement with the Screen Actors Guild, whose contract expired in June. That has led studios to delay production on some films that they can't afford to have interrupted by a work stoppage.
OPINION
June 30, 2008
The contract between Hollywood studios and the largest actors union, the Screen Actors Guild, expires at midnight, but don't hold your breath for a last-minute deal. Rather than bargaining feverishly to end an impasse that has already idled thousands of workers, negotiators have been biding their time until July 8. That's when the smaller actors union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, finishes voting on the tentative contract its board overwhelmingly approved this month.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2008 | Richard Verrier
No Screen Actors Guild election would be complete without controversy, as evidenced by the latest drama inside Hollywood's most discordant trade union. Next week, nearly one-third of SAG's 71 national board seats will be up for grabs in an election that could change the course of the organization. But even before ballots have been counted, dissident board candidates are fuming over the timing of a "special bulletin." The bulletin was recently mailed to the guild's 120,000 members at an estimated cost of more than $100,000.
OPINION
December 8, 2008
It came as no surprise that a federal mediator failed to end the stalemate between Hollywood studios and the industry's largest actors union, the Screen Actors Guild. The predictability of the outcome, though, doesn't make it less disappointing. The lingering discord, which has slowed or even sidelined some projects, is bad for everyone -- especially the workers and companies whose livelihoods depend on film and TV production but who don't have a seat at the negotiating table.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2008 | Richard Verrier
No Screen Actors Guild election would be complete without controversy, as evidenced by the latest drama inside Hollywood's most discordant trade union. Next week, nearly one-third of SAG's 71 national board seats will be up for grabs in an election that could change the course of the organization. But even before ballots have been counted, dissident board candidates are fuming over the timing of a "special bulletin." The bulletin was recently mailed to the guild's 120,000 members at an estimated cost of more than $100,000.
OPINION
August 26, 2008
The entertainment industry is reputed to be recession-proof, but in the current downturn even Hollywood isn't firing on all cylinders. It's still mired in the labor turmoil that began when the Writers Guild of America walked out in November. Although that strike ended in February, the studios have yet to reach agreement with the Screen Actors Guild, whose contract expired in June. That has led studios to delay production on some films that they can't afford to have interrupted by a work stoppage.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
New York members of the Screen Actors Guild national board issued a sharp rebuke of their own leaders Sunday, demanding that they seek help from a federal mediator if contract talks don't progress by Aug. 25. The unusual criticism was the latest sign of infighting between the Hollywood and New York factions on SAG's 71-member national board. The New York group, which holds 14 seats on the board, blasted SAG leaders for "failing to bargain realistically" with the studios. "Nothing is happening, and we're no closer to a deal today than we were six weeks ago," the New York members said in a statement, contradicting assertions by SAG Executive Director Doug Allen and President Alan Rosenberg that contract discussions with the studios were ongoing.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
As talks between the Screen Actors Guild and the major studios founder, a coalition of actors is mounting an election challenge to a group that swept SAG President Alan Rosenberg into office nearly three years ago, deepening a rift inside Hollywood's largest union. The challengers are taking direct aim at Membership First, the Hollywood-based political group within SAG that holds a slight majority on the national board and came to power in 2005 vowing to take a harder line in negotiations with the studios.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2008 | Richard Verrier and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
A campaign by the Screen Actors Guild to persuade members of a smaller rival union to vote down a new contract has foundered, an outcome that could weaken SAG's leverage in its negotiations with the Hollywood studios. Members of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists on Tuesday approved a new three-year, prime-time TV contract, dealing a blow to SAG leaders who had gambled heavily on defeating a contract they blasted as bad for actors.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
As talks between the Screen Actors Guild and the major studios founder, a coalition of actors is mounting an election challenge to a group that swept SAG President Alan Rosenberg into office nearly three years ago, deepening a rift inside Hollywood's largest union. The challengers are taking direct aim at Membership First, the Hollywood-based political group within SAG that holds a slight majority on the national board and came to power in 2005 vowing to take a harder line in negotiations with the studios.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2008 | Richard Verrier and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
A campaign by the Screen Actors Guild to persuade members of a smaller rival union to vote down a new contract has foundered, an outcome that could weaken SAG's leverage in its negotiations with the Hollywood studios. Members of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists on Tuesday approved a new three-year, prime-time TV contract, dealing a blow to SAG leaders who had gambled heavily on defeating a contract they blasted as bad for actors.
OPINION
June 30, 2008
The contract between Hollywood studios and the largest actors union, the Screen Actors Guild, expires at midnight, but don't hold your breath for a last-minute deal. Rather than bargaining feverishly to end an impasse that has already idled thousands of workers, negotiators have been biding their time until July 8. That's when the smaller actors union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, finishes voting on the tentative contract its board overwhelmingly approved this month.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2008 | Richard Verrier and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
One of the industry's biggest movie stars Thursday called on leaders of both actors unions to end a fierce and increasingly ugly feud that has put Hollywood on edge. George Clooney stopped short of denouncing leaders of the Screen Actors Guild, but he did indirectly question a campaign the union was waging to defeat an agreement negotiated by the smaller actors union, the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists.
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