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Smaller Districts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000
Re "Dear Genethia Hayes: Smaller School Districts Are Better," Dec. 26, 1999. Dear Shirley Svorny: You told Hayes that "there is a body of evidence--as 'definitive' as evidence ever gets--that smaller districts would be an improvement over our current, mammoth district." Oh? You did not cite a reference to specific studies to provide such evidence. Where is the beef? If smaller is better, then it stands to reason that the Compton Unified School District is better than the Los Angeles Unified School District.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2003
For today, unless otherwise noted. San Bernardino County All public schools of the city of San Bernardino. All Catholic schools in the Diocese of San Bernardino. Cal State San Bernardino campus will be closed today and Tuesday. Schools in the Alta Loma and Etiwanda districts, as well as all elementary school child-care programs in the Alta Loma district. Rancho Cucamonga high schools in the Chaffey Joint Union High School District. Schools in the Rialto Unified School District.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1993
The Los Angeles Unified School District is too large and inefficient to properly educate the vast majority of the kids of Los Angeles. Besides being overcrowded, the schools are centers for drugs, gangs, crime, graffiti and taggers--centers for terrorism on students and the surrounding communities. Smaller districts of 100,000 will allow administrators to use greater discipline and control to best educate and deal with their problems for a better education. This is not a race issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2002 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what he called a "simple but radical" education plan, Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Jones on Wednesday proposed limiting all school districts in California to 30,000 students, setting up special academies to train teachers and streamlining state education functions. Accomplishing Jones' goal would require splitting the Los Angeles Unified School District, with its roughly 736,000 students, into at least 24 districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1987
I read the article regarding state Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig's remarks about the feasibility of dividing the Los Angeles School District into smaller districts (Metro, Oct. 30). The deed is half done. The district is already divided and this happened the moment that board members were elected from districts rather than at-large. The trade-off was minority representation, but the price may have been too high to pay. There are over 500,000 students in Los Angeles, but each board member views these students' needs from the perspective of his or her own particular district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1992
Sherry Babitch Jeffe ("The Solution to California's Continuing Budget Woes," Opinion, Sept. 6) says that "Californians must consider restructuring the entire political system that drives its government and the governmental institutions that reflect the system." Perhaps one long-term change which we should consider is the exchange of our traditional two-house Legislature for the more straightforward one-house (unicameral) model. While such a change could not by itself solve the budgetary dilemma, it would help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995
I, too, like Sandy Enfield (Letters to the Valley Edition, July 30), am a dedicated teacher in the LAUSD. I have recently returned from the three-week summer institute, which provided training to over 100 principals and lead teachers as part of LEARN. It was disconcerting to read the July 30 op ed piece by Janet Bernson ("With LAUSD Promotions, It's the Principal of the Thing") and the letter from Enfield, both of which were despairing of our district ever improving and were hearty proponents of the breakup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1999
I read with great interest the Sept. 12 letters of rebuttal to Capistrano Unified's superintendent, James A. Fleming, especially the insights provided by fired teacher Paul Pflueger. Pflueger stated that Fleming and his staff seem to be primarily concerned with public relations rather than real education in the classroom. He was right on target. After 29 years at a state university, I can certainly identify. Educrats have no compunctions about spending public money allocated for education for their own selfish purposes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1998
Proposition 223, the so-called Education Efficiency Initiative, may be efficient for Los Angeles' teachers union, which sponsored it, but it is a disaster for our local schools. This Trojan horse promises to put more money in the classroom by capping administrative spending at 5% and spending the "savings" on things like books, computers and teachers. What it delivers is something quite different. In reality, the measure redefines "administrators" and employs a spending-limit formula that almost guarantees failure for small- to mid-size school districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1989
Some state legislators point with not-so-hidden criticism at the problems and faults of large urban school districts located outside their own areas, low test scores, high drop-out rates, students who can't speak English, violence on campus, overcrowding and a gamut of others that most smaller districts are very fortunate not to have. Given those severe problems, which affect several hundred thousand students in the Los Angeles Unified School District, it seems unreasonable on the part of Assemblyman Pat Nolan to question what he perceives to be "disparities" in the state funding formulas used to provide resources to public school districts of different sizes (Op-Ed Page, June 9)
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An initiative before Los Angeles County voters this week has the potential to scramble the local power structure and redefine what may be the most important branch of regional government. The initiative is Measure A, which would boost the membership of the county Board of Supervisors from the current five to nine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Fernando Valley group learned Monday that it has collected enough valid signatures to move forward with its goal of breaking up the 710,000-student Los Angeles Unified School District. The group, Finally Restoring Excellence in Education--known as FREE--collected 20,962 signatures of residents advocating the creation of two new school districts in the Valley, according to the county office of education, which validated the signatures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1999 | SHIRLEY SVORNY, Shirley Svorny is professor of economics at Cal State Northridge
Genethia Hayes, president of the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education, was quoted in The Times as saying: "Why are they talking about breakup 1/8of the district 3/8 when there is a new school board with a new thrust? If someone could tell me definitively that smaller districts are better than larger districts, then I would entertain a conversation." Dear President Hayes: Smaller districts are better than larger districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1999
I read with great interest the Sept. 12 letters of rebuttal to Capistrano Unified's superintendent, James A. Fleming, especially the insights provided by fired teacher Paul Pflueger. Pflueger stated that Fleming and his staff seem to be primarily concerned with public relations rather than real education in the classroom. He was right on target. After 29 years at a state university, I can certainly identify. Educrats have no compunctions about spending public money allocated for education for their own selfish purposes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1998
Proposition 223, the so-called Education Efficiency Initiative, may be efficient for Los Angeles' teachers union, which sponsored it, but it is a disaster for our local schools. This Trojan horse promises to put more money in the classroom by capping administrative spending at 5% and spending the "savings" on things like books, computers and teachers. What it delivers is something quite different. In reality, the measure redefines "administrators" and employs a spending-limit formula that almost guarantees failure for small- to mid-size school districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1998 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of the Los Angeles teachers union Wednesday criticized the campaign to dismantle the Los Angeles Unified School District, telling a small gathering of parents that the effort will lead to political fights without improving student achievement. Day Higuchi, president of United Teachers-Los Angeles, warned an audience of 30 at El Camino Real High School that a district breakup would drain local resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1997
The Nov. 2 Valley section contains two articles on the Los Angeles Unified School District, "Lack of Information Can Often Be Costly for L.A. School Board," and "School District Breakup Backers Start Petition Drive." Although ostensibly unrelated, the former illustrates beautifully the need for the latter. While the first article outlined in interesting detail what information the board was lacking (denied?) to make informed, educated, budget-conscious decisions in the best interests of both kindergartners and Reading Recovery students, there was no discussion of accountability or repercussions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1987
Is the Los Angeles School District too large, cumbersome and inefficient? Since there has been much talk lately about breaking up the Los Angeles School District into smaller districts, I would like to add my two cents worth. When it takes over three months to receive a set of textbooks ordered from a supplier within the state, only a few hundred miles away, it begins to be very frustrating. I am a teacher in the Los Angeles district, and I ordered a set of textbooks for a business organization class the first week of the semester.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1997
The Nov. 2 Valley section contains two articles on the Los Angeles Unified School District, "Lack of Information Can Often Be Costly for L.A. School Board," and "School District Breakup Backers Start Petition Drive." Although ostensibly unrelated, the former illustrates beautifully the need for the latter. While the first article outlined in interesting detail what information the board was lacking (denied?) to make informed, educated, budget-conscious decisions in the best interests of both kindergartners and Reading Recovery students, there was no discussion of accountability or repercussions.
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